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Supplemental Security Income Program

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1990
Unfortunately, for The Times and its readers, your article about the Supplemental Security Income program is full of misleading statements. As two long-term employees of Social Security (combined 38 years in district offices), we have put thousands of people on SSI, and none of them had to complete an application that "boggles the mind." Claims representatives are there to complete the applications with and for the customers. We never give out blank application forms to the public to complete themselves.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2005 | George Skelton, George Skelton writes Monday and Thursday. Reach him at george.skelton@latimes.com.
The letters to 1.2 million Californians began arriving shortly after Thanksgiving. These were not holiday greetings. They were messages of bad news written in government gobbledygook. The letters were sent to the aged, blind and disabled who are living on the edge, clinging to government benefits for subsistence. The mangled message was this: Normally, you'd be getting a cost of living adjustment (COLA) starting Jan. 1. But don't look for it. Gov.
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NEWS
October 16, 1987 | Associated Press
A new Reagan Administration policy that will mean lower welfare benefits for many elderly, blind and disabled people who get free food, shelter, firewood or winter clothing from churches and other charitable organizations drew outrage today from advocates for the poor and homeless. Under the new policy, non-cash help must be counted as income, the New York Times reported today. "For every bag of groceries we give these poor people, the government will reduce their benefit checks," said Sharon M.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
President Clinton signed legislation allowing an estimated 20,000 immigrants, mostly poor and elderly, to continue receiving supplemental security income benefits. Clinton said the legislation reverses "unduly harsh" restrictions on federal assistance to legal immigrants. Non-U.S. citizens were removed from SSI rolls under the welfare reform law of 1996. Congress later extended the benefits through Sept. 30, 1998.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
On the first day of the new year, new rules will raise the amount of money recipients of government disability benefits may earn, the Department of Health and Human Services announced Friday. Health Secretary Louis W. Sullivan said the increases "will serve as an additional incentive for many disabled Americans to return to work and improve the quality of life for themselves and their families."
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | From Associated Press
Admitting some poor children were wrongly taken off disability rolls, the Social Security Administration will review at least 45,000 cases and give every child who was cut another chance to appeal. Newly installed Commissioner Kenneth S. Apfel said Wednesday that a "top-to-bottom" review found a variety of problems as states determined whether 288,000 children met a new definition of disability.
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson on Sunday joined fellow state executives in calling on Congress to provide new help for some legal immigrants who will lose benefits under last year's welfare reform bill, but he insisted that the fundamentals of the law should not be revisited. "There is a problem here, no one disputes that," Wilson said. "But I don't think it requires reopening the [welfare] act." Wilson made his remarks during an interview at the meeting of the National Governors' Assn.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | VIRGINIA ELLIS and PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Asserting that hundreds of thousands of destitute and disabled people face imminent danger of losing their only means of support, a coalition of civil rights attorneys sued the federal government Wednesday to stop it from denying aid to legal immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1988 | JAY GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Paul Longmore watched a copy of a book that took him 10 years to write go up in smoke Tuesday. And he lit the match. Book burnings often are expressions of intolerance, but this one in front of the Federal Building downtown was a protest against regulations governing federal disability programs run by the Social Security Administration.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | MAX BOOT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tara Williams and her four children live in a house where the blinds are always drawn and the lights always muted. Her youngest children, 3-year-old twins, are allergic to virtually everything--cheese, eggs, pork, chicken, even sunlight. Exposure to bright lights leads the children to break out in white welts. "It's a matter of life and death.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | From Associated Press
Admitting some poor children were wrongly taken off disability rolls, the Social Security Administration will review at least 45,000 cases and give every child who was cut another chance to appeal. Newly installed Commissioner Kenneth S. Apfel said Wednesday that a "top-to-bottom" review found a variety of problems as states determined whether 288,000 children met a new definition of disability.
NEWS
October 13, 1997 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard started talking about killing himself when he was 5 1/2 years old. He was not joking. He was not being manipulative. "I didn't see him try to attempt it," said Richard's mother. "It's just the fact that I was hearing it--that his mind was going there--that was alarming and suggested we should address it." Now Richard is 11, on medication for attention deficit disorder, and in therapy with a psychiatrist and a psychologist for depression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1997 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Louisa Gourjian sees people every week who are desperately poor and overwhelmed by fear. The threat of losing food stamps and other benefits under the new federal welfare reforms effective next month has both recipients and social service agencies on edge about the future. "We are really scared," said Gourjian, assistant director of the Armenian Relief Society in Glendale. "Some of them are really hopeless." Some clients, she said, are even contemplating suicide.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | VIRGINIA ELLIS and PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Asserting that hundreds of thousands of destitute and disabled people face imminent danger of losing their only means of support, a coalition of civil rights attorneys sued the federal government Wednesday to stop it from denying aid to legal immigrants.
NEWS
February 3, 1997 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson on Sunday joined fellow state executives in calling on Congress to provide new help for some legal immigrants who will lose benefits under last year's welfare reform bill, but he insisted that the fundamentals of the law should not be revisited. "There is a problem here, no one disputes that," Wilson said. "But I don't think it requires reopening the [welfare] act." Wilson made his remarks during an interview at the meeting of the National Governors' Assn.
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities will begin mailing notices Monday to about 1 million elderly and disabled legal immigrants who now receive Supplemental Security Income, informing them their monthly benefit checks will be terminated this summer if they have not attained U.S. citizenship or do not otherwise qualify under special exemptions.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that the government has wrongly denied monthly benefits and free medical care to poor disabled children by imposing stringent, unfair guidelines for eligibility. The ruling could affect tens or even hundreds of thousands of low-income handicapped children denied Social Security benefits over the last 15 years.
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California counties are bracing for the first financial hit from the welfare revolution, when thousands of Social Security recipients will be forced off the rolls in January by a new law that strips drug addicts and alcoholics of federal benefits. California's counties--the safety net of last resort--are expecting to inherit the burden of providing for about 33,000 people ejected from the Social Security system.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | GEORGE SKELTON
Gov. Pete Wilson has just pulled off one of the slickest moves seen in the Capitol since, well, since Willie Brown was here last year. The governor maneuvered Democrats into a corner on their own issue: education. People have watched and marveled and applauded, if grudgingly. He has earned the accolades. But there also has been another move that has attracted little notice, probably because it's the sort of thing that makes people feel uncomfortable to watch. Maybe even embarrassed.
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