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HEALTH
March 29, 2010 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At a time when so many people are trying to clean out their systems with detoxifying pads, pills and gadgets, let's take a moment to honor the liver, the best detox device a body can have. Without prompting, the liver breaks down and dispenses with all sorts of toxic compounds, including alcohol and acetaminophen. Anyone who is truly interested in removing poisons from the body should probably spend less time applying detoxifying pads and potions and more time protecting their liver. One way to give your liver a lift is to avoid bombarding it with too many poisons in the first place.
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BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
The rancorous battle over Herbalife's business practices took a critical turn as the company revealed that it is being investigated by the Federal Trade Commission. Herbalife did not reveal details of the probe, but the Los Angeles nutritional products maker reiterated its long-held position that its business model is sound. The company has been the target of accusations that it operates a pyramid scheme. "Herbalife welcomes the inquiry given the tremendous amount of misinformation in the marketplace, and will cooperate fully with the FTC," the company said in a statement.
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HEALTH
May 19, 2012 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Until recently, very few people had ever heard of raspberry ketones, the aromatic compounds that give the berries their distinctive smell. Today, health food stores have trouble keeping the capsules or drops of the stuff on their shelves. Almost overnight, an obscure plant compound became the next big thing in weight loss - and all it took was a few words from Dr. Oz. In a February episode of "The Dr. Oz Show," Mehmet Oz told viewers that raspberry ketones were "the No. 1 miracle in a bottle to burn your fat. " Once Oz calls something a "miracle," it doesn't remain obscure for long.
SCIENCE
December 17, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Looking for ways to save money in 2014? Here's some advice from doctors: Stop buying vitamins. Time after time, studies have shown that vitamin and mineral supplements don't prevent disease or death. And yet consumers keep buying them, lament the authors of an editorial published in Tuesday's edition of the Annals of Internal Medicine. A 2011 report from the National Center for Health Statistics estimated that 53% of American adults used some type of supplement in the years 2003 to 2006, with multivitamin/multimineral formulations being the most popular.
HEALTH
November 2, 2009 | Chris Woolston
Female fertility can be a mysterious business. No matter how carefully a woman tracks her ovulation or times her romantic encounters, there's no guarantee that a baby will be on the way. Women who have trouble conceiving get lots of free advice: Relax, take a cruise, try different intercourse positions, etc. But could the solution lie in a supplement? Two companies promise to boost female fertility through blends of herbs, vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. The ingredient list for FertilityBlend for Women, manufactured by Daily Wellness Inc., includes the herb chasteberry ( Vitex agnus-castus )
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Mark Wahlberg stands to make some money for all of his pain and gain -- and in more ways than one.  The actor's own line of fitness supplements, called Marked Nutrition, is being used to promote his new movie, Paramount Pictures' "Pain & Gain. " Wahlberg developed the products with Pittsburgh health and nutrition company GNC Holdings Inc., which since August has sold them at its stores and online. In interviews and in promotional materials, Wahlberg has touted his use of Marked in preparation for playing a bodybuilder in the Michael Bay-directed film.
HEALTH
December 21, 2009 | By Emily Sohn
With at least two flus and plenty of colds, coughs and sore throats circulating this season, some Americans are turning to zinc to ward off viruses. Lozenges, supplements and nasal sprays that contain the mineral claim to boost immunity, and there is some evidence that they might do so. In an effort to stay well, though, we might be making ourselves sick. Consistently taking excessive FOR THE RECORD: Dietitian's name: An earlier version of this article misspelled the name of dietitian Ruth Frechman as Frenchman.
HEALTH
December 5, 2011 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Struggling with the black dog of depression? The supplement aisle abounds with options for people seeking a non-medicinal remedy - but figuring out what works and what doesn't can be a challenge for consumers and experts alike. That's because the data are generally poor, says Dr. Charles Raison, associate professor of psychiatry in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona in Tucson. There are some exceptions. Hundreds of studies have investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acids and St. John's wort.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Thyroid disorders are common, which means there's a market for over-the-counter "thyroid support" dietary supplements. But consumers should be cautious about taking these pills, says the author of a new study. Thyroid support supplements typically contain two different thyroid hormones -- T3 and T4 -- derived largely from animal thyroid glands, said the author of the study, Dr. Victor Bernet, an endocrinologist at Mayo Clinic, Florida. In a study of 10 brands of supplements, nine contained an animal hormone.
SCIENCE
May 8, 2013 | By Monte Morin
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced the recall of several dietary supplements that contain the undeclared drug tadalafil, which is used to treat erectile dysfunction. The products -- SexVoltz, Velextra, and Amerect -- were manufactured by BeaMonstar Products of Queen Creek, Ariz., and were distributed nationally, according to the FDA.  "These undeclared active ingredients pose a threat to consumers because tadalafil may interact with nitrates found in some prescription drugs such as nitroglycerin and may lower blood pressure to dangerous levels," read an FDA notice of the recall.  "Consumers with diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or heart disease often take nitrates.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Big issues in the workplace - wages, overtime, time off, working conditions - are also major topics in the state Legislature. And this year, lawmakers delivered some tangible changes that will be felt in the pocketbook. At the top of the list, of course, is an increase in the minimum wage that swept through Democrat-dominated Sacramento, despite opposition from powerful business interests. But workers didn't get all of their agenda passed into law. "We were able to improve upon existing protections as well as support workers in a number of new ways, including increasing the minimum wage," said Steve Smith, a spokesman for the California Labor Federation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Rene Lynch
"The Biggest Loser" producers continue to stay mum in the face of "cheating scandal" headlines. But one person who is talking -- kind of -- says the return of "American Idol" winner Ruben Studdard is the real deal. Viewers were shocked when this week's weigh-in began with news that trainer Jillian Michaels broke rules by giving her teammates caffeine supplements. As a result, the earlier week's weigh-in was overturned, paving the way for the return of Studdard, the highest profile player ever to take part in NBC's weight-loss reality show.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Martin Tsai
The documentary "Not Yet Begun to Fight" follows war veterans on the mend from different physical and psychological traumas as they take up fly fishing. Retired Marine Col. Eric Hastings, a Vietnam vet, co-founded the Warriors & Quiet Waters Foundation, a Bozeman, Mont., retreat that provides a six-day recreational program that supplements the rehabilitation regimens for wounded service personnel. Along for the ride are Marine Capt. Blake Smith, who survived a helicopter collision that left him paraplegic; retired Navy SEAL Elliott Miller, who was shot and lost his ability to speak; Marine Staff Sgt. Mark Hupp, wrestling with post-traumatic stress disorder; Marine Cpl. Erik Goodge, who lost his right eye in a blast; and Army Sgt. Erin Schaefer, also paraplegic.
HEALTH
October 26, 2013 | By Chris Woolston
In cookbooks, health food stores and alternative health clinics, the word is getting out: Acid is the latest dietary villain. It's not necessarily the acid in foods like tomatoes and lemons that supposedly cause the trouble. Instead, a growing number of people claim that meats, wheat, soda, coffee, alcohol and processed foods of all sorts produce acid in the body after they've been digested. The acid, in turn, is said to fuel health problems including arthritis, obesity and cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2013 | By Marcia Adair
The first day of school, one of America's great communal experiences. Pencils are sharpened, backpacks bought and outfits laid out, found to be totally lame, OMG, and laid out again. But what today's kids in Los Angeles public schools will experience on Days 2 through 180 is significantly different from what their parents enjoyed when it comes to music, art, drama and field trips. For a variety of reasons, funds available to school boards for education in California have been devastated over the last 20 years, to levels some in the industry call the worst in U.S. history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos and Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
As Gov. Jerry Brown announced more funding for public schools Tuesday, the Los Angeles Board of Education agreed to pay for more school police, maintain a classroom breakfast program and keep supplemental staff at schools. The board also heard projections of next school year's budget, which - for the first time in six years - wasn't expected to require any new cuts. L.A. Unified schools Supt. John Deasy had asked the seven-member board to approve the so-called discretionary programs, although it was unclear whether they would all be funded directly from the district's general fund.
HEALTH
December 20, 2010 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Holistic nutrition. " You may not know the term, but you've surely heard its claims. Among other things, holistic nutritionists (or HNs, as they call themselves) may teach that fluoride and pesticides are lethal, that most diseases and detrimental behaviors are diet-related and that many people would benefit from taking numerous supplements. I've read plenty of articles by HNs in which they assert that they are disparaged by mainstream medicine and warn you not to trust modern medicine.
SPORTS
February 2, 2013 | Chris Erskine
I've used deer antler spray for two days now, and I've rarely felt better, though I do find myself with an overwhelming urge to grind my itchy noggin against big birch trees, and last night, as someone pulled into the driveway, I just suddenly froze in the high beams. Does deer antler spray really work? Obviously. Or it could be the latest take on snake oil. To find out, I'm testing the legal product personally. So far, there are no signs of aggression, a reported side effect of these so-called IGF-1 supplements.
SCIENCE
May 8, 2013 | By Monte Morin
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced the recall of several dietary supplements that contain the undeclared drug tadalafil, which is used to treat erectile dysfunction. The products -- SexVoltz, Velextra, and Amerect -- were manufactured by BeaMonstar Products of Queen Creek, Ariz., and were distributed nationally, according to the FDA.  "These undeclared active ingredients pose a threat to consumers because tadalafil may interact with nitrates found in some prescription drugs such as nitroglycerin and may lower blood pressure to dangerous levels," read an FDA notice of the recall.  "Consumers with diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or heart disease often take nitrates.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Mark Wahlberg stands to make some money for all of his pain and gain -- and in more ways than one.  The actor's own line of fitness supplements, called Marked Nutrition, is being used to promote his new movie, Paramount Pictures' "Pain & Gain. " Wahlberg developed the products with Pittsburgh health and nutrition company GNC Holdings Inc., which since August has sold them at its stores and online. In interviews and in promotional materials, Wahlberg has touted his use of Marked in preparation for playing a bodybuilder in the Michael Bay-directed film.
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