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Supply And Demand

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WORLD
April 22, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, L.A. Times
He's a young man in an ill-fitting suit standing in the principal's office beneath pictures of Afghan sages and Wile E. Coyote. There's no principal, but he says he'll hire one as soon as he finds investors. He could use a few more chairs and pencils too; just drop them off on the other side of the razor wire. "There's a need for private schools, and I'm doing this to benefit me and my countrymen," said Abdul Azim Rawi Almajid, owner of a new school named after himself. "They're not just for the rich anymore.
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NATIONAL
March 22, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
In a Louisiana swamp several miles upriver from the Gulf of Mexico, about 3,000 construction workers are building a massive industrial facility to liquefy natural gas, preparing for a new era when the U.S. will begin exporting energy around the globe. The $12-billion project is one of the largest single industrial investments in the nation, part of a massive transformation of the energy sector that has led to a boom in drilling, transportation and refining from coast to coast. Five years ago, the idea of exporting U.S. gas and oil was not only unheard of, but, in the case of most U.S. crude oil, illegal.
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BUSINESS
September 14, 1986
In John F. Lawrence's Sept. 7 column, "Sex Bias Still Lives--Even for Dry Cleaning," let's overlook the sexism in the remark that women are more appearance-conscious than men and pretend that it is a proven fact. Where does this lead us? Gloria Allred proves that she is a lawyer and not an economist by assuming that the final selling price is solely a function of the cost of production. Hasn't she ever heard of demand? The amount that consumers are willing to pay is as important as production costs in determining the final selling price of any product or service.
OPINION
February 23, 2014
Re "Better than a minimum wage," Opinion, Feb. 21 USC economist Larry Harris says that instead of raising the minimum wage, low wages should be beefed up by government wage vouchers. Harris mentions that payroll taxes would increase with more employment, but since this would be facilitated by government money, it would be the dog chasing its own tail. Arguing that wage subsidies would be better than boosting the minimum wage, Harris says that business owners follow the market principle of supply and demand.
NATIONAL
February 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Tuition at some of New York's top private kindergartens will exceed $26,000 for the first time in September, almost as much as the cost of attending Yale or Princeton universities and twice that of the state universities. "It's supply and demand," said Nina Bauer, a counselor at Ivy Wise Kids, a service that for $5,000 coaches parents on how to prepare 4- and 5-year-olds for tests and interviews. "Wall Street got big bonuses this year. Everyone is just dying to get in."
BUSINESS
July 31, 2008
'The futures market is a zero-sum game. For anyone who wants to buy oil, someone has to sell it. If the price goes up, the buyer makes a profit and the seller loses, and vice versa. For every winner there is a loser. This serves to stabilize the market but does not change supply and demand.' -- Gary Robb, Los Feliz, on a July 23 story about a finding by a federal interagency task force that supply and demand, not oil speculation, explain the record rise in oil prices
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1996
At the same time that there is a hue and cry that the rise in minimum wage to $4.75 per hour will cost jobs, the sign at a McDonald's in Hilliard, Ohio, reads "Now hiring, all shifts, $7.00 per hour." Supply and demand does the best job of regulating wages. In California there is too much supply. SHIRLEY E. ROTH Fountain Valley
BUSINESS
June 13, 2004
Whether you like it or not, the natural laws of supply and demand will win out over laws passed by well-meaning legislatures every time, and there's nothing anyone, even liberals, can do about it ("Assembly OKs Wage Increase," May 27). In the long run, people get paid what their skills are worth to an employer -- no more and no less. Setting a higher "minimum wage" does no good for anyone except the liberals who sleep better at night with the (false) belief that they have done something good for poor people (or at least have won their votes)
REAL ESTATE
April 4, 1993
Concerning your "California, Here I Go" article, you did a great service for the vast majority of Southern Californians who still don't understand why our housing market continues to deteriorate. The fact is that corporations are emphasizing job creation in low-cost markets, while rapidly retrenching from high-cost areas like Southern California. Southern California has myriad cost disadvantages to other areas of the country. When you think about where one has to live in L.A. to afford a $150,000 home, you begin to look at long commutes, high pollution and "generic suburbia."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1999
We are spending hundreds of millions of dollars trying to curb the flow of illegal drugs into this country. Much of this money is being spent in the countries where the drugs originate. The flow of drugs follows the law of supply and demand. If there were no demand, there would be no supply. How about turning our attention to the millions of people in this country who are users of recreational drugs? Not that the drug enforcement people are neglecting this approach entirely. They are busy cracking down on those who use marijuana as medicine.
NEWS
October 23, 2013 | By Roxane Gay, guest blogger
Even though I've seen a mere handful of episodes of “Keeping Up With the Kardashians , ” I know too many things about Kim Kardashian and her sisters and the machinations of their manager-mother. I know things about Kim's appearance (gluteally speaking) and the kind of car she drives and with whom she socializes. Then there is, of course, that business with the sex tape. In 2011, Kardashian married NBA player Kris Humphries. There was no missing this news because the media exhaustively covered the engagement, wedding planning and wedding itself.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
STATEN ISLAND, Calif. - The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is one of the most biologically diverse and ecologically sensitive areas in the country and the source of 30% of Southern California's water. It's also broken. Those may be the only facts about the delta on which everybody agrees. Because of oxidation of the area's unprotected peaty soil, the level of farm tracts on some of its 57 levee-ringed islands has dropped to as much as 30 feet below sea level. That makes them especially vulnerable to a rise in the water level, deterioration of the levees and contamination by saltwater flowing in from San Francisco Bay. Habitat for countless species of fish, bird and mammal has been destroyed.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo
Underneath the spectacular home price gains in the Southland this year is a story of supply and demand. On Tuesday, the real estate research firm DataQuick reported a 4.6% increase month-over-month in the median home price and a whopping 28.3% jump from the same month last year to hit $385,000. That was the highest year-over-year gain for any month in DataQuick's records going back to January 1989. That jump in the median price came as sales fell 6.2% from May 2013 and were down 2.1% from June 2012.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2012 | Nathaniel Popper
Screaming about higher gas prices? Jeff Grossman does it every day. He is one of the dozens of traders in brightly colored jackets who pack the floor of the New York Mercantile Exchange, one of the world's premier hubs for energy trading. The 130-year-old venue is one of the last in Manhattan where people can still shout out orders instead of them silently being processed by computers. That's given traders such as Grossman a rather unique perspective on the rising price of fuel -- especially since prices at the pump typically follow moves on the trading floor by just a few days.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2011 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Time
Gasoline prices dropped nearly 10 cents in the state in the last week — the biggest one-week drop in California since December 2008, according to the U.S. Energy Department. The fall in prices should accelerate in spite of the fact that the Memorial Day weekend is usually one of the biggest periods of the year for fuel demand, analysts said. The average cost of a gallon of self-serve regular gasoline in California fell 9.7 cents to $4.121 since last week, according to the Energy Department's weekly telephone survey of service stations.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2011 | By Martin Sandbu
The heap of pop economics books ? with Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner's "Freakonomics" at the top ? just keeps growing. How did this genre, which a decade ago was nearly barren, become the jungle it is today? The books themselves have a ready answer: The benefit to readers of another title exceeds the production costs by enough to make writing it worthwhile. Eduardo Porter, author of "The Price of Everything: Solving the Mystery of Why We Pay What We Do," surely agrees. The title, however, is misleading.
OPINION
September 2, 1990
Once again, as in the 1970s, the Middle East crisis has increased the appetite of the oil companies to make great profits. Their marketing double talk hasn't convinced most Southern Californians or the nation. I don't think we'll receive any legislation to curb the high increases in gasoline prices. I propose that everyone personally pledge a reduction of five gallons a week, i.e., walk to the local stores, food establishments, etc. I believe the old adage is "supply and demand."
WORLD
April 22, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, L.A. Times
He's a young man in an ill-fitting suit standing in the principal's office beneath pictures of Afghan sages and Wile E. Coyote. There's no principal, but he says he'll hire one as soon as he finds investors. He could use a few more chairs and pencils too; just drop them off on the other side of the razor wire. "There's a need for private schools, and I'm doing this to benefit me and my countrymen," said Abdul Azim Rawi Almajid, owner of a new school named after himself. "They're not just for the rich anymore.
TRAVEL
January 24, 2010
Why can't we be more like Spain? Regarding "Madrid to Barcelona in a Flash" by Bruce Selcraig, Jan. 17: While Spain and other industrialized countries continue building high-speed-train networks and maintaining their infrastructure, our infrastructure continues to fall apart, our country continues to wage wars and is building roads, bridges, dams and public buildings in Afghanistan. This year alone we are spending $100 billion in Afghanistan. Are we dumb or what? As my dad would have said: "That is America."
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