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Supply Officer

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1988
In an odd sort of way, San Diego may benefit from the East Coast's experience with medical wastes washing ashore last summer. When health officials there were forced to close beaches in the midst of a major heat wave, national attention quickly focused on the problem of medical waste disposal. This gave local officials a bit of a head start when the problem hit San Diego County beaches last month.
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NEWS
August 20, 1986 | Associated Press
Navy Secretary John F. Lehman, in an unusual departure from tradition, today authorized star running back and Ens. Napoleon McCallum to play pro football with the Los Angeles Raiders on weekends. The 23-year-old McCallum, an all-American who set 26 school records at the U.S. Naval Academy, was selected by the Raiders in the fourth round of the National Football League draft last April even though he faces a minimum five-year military commitment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1985 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Sen Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) announced Monday that he has asked Secretary of the Navy John Lehman for a detailed briefing on Lehman's decision to relieve three ranking Navy officers at Miramar Naval Air Station over the base's purchase of $630 airplane ashtrays from Grumman Corp. Wilson said he wanted to ensure that the officers were not deprived of "basic fairness."
SPORTS
March 26, 1987 | WILLIAM GILDEA, The Washington Post
James H. Webb Jr., nominated to be secretary of the Navy, is known to be considering a reversal of the decisions by outgoing Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr. to allow former Navy running back Napoleon McCallum to play professional football and All-American David Robinson to play professional basketball. Webb, who faces confirmation by the Senate, is known to believe strongly that military service after graduation from the U.S.
NATIONAL
February 9, 2006 | From Associated Press
A former soldier injured in Iraq is getting a refund after being forced to pay for his missing body armor vest, which medics destroyed because it was soaked with his blood, officials said Wednesday. First Lt. William "Eddie" Rebrook IV, 25, had to leave the Army with a shrapnel injury to his arm. But before he could be discharged last week, he said, he had to scrounge cash from his buddies to pay $632 for the body armor and other gear he had lost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1996 | MARY F. POLS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Part tedious but still plenty dangerous, the final hours of the Grand fire wound down Wednesday with crack teams of firefighters being airlifted into rough mountainous country to douse the remaining hot spots while crews at the command center began dismantling tents, packing up unneeded supplies and enjoying the luxury of their first showers in days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1985 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Purchasing officials at Miramar Naval Air Station this year paid Grumman Aerospace $5,775 for a jet fighter machine gun part that would have cost less than half that amount had it been ordered from General Electric Co.--the firm that made the part. Copies of documents obtained by The Times show that air station officials in December placed a near-wartime priority on purchasing the replacement gun component for a Grumman-built F-14 Tomcat fighter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1985 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Grumman Corp., stung by controversy over its sale of two exorbitantly priced airplane ashtrays to Miramar Naval Air Station here, plans to credit the Navy almost $95,000 for ashtrays and other specified aircraft parts delivered over the last 15 years, a Grumman spokesman said Wednesday. Michael Drake said the company, based on Long Island, N.Y., decided this week to pay back the Navy "because we're embarrassed . . . and want to avoid further controversy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1997 | DAWN HOBBS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Avocados, artichokes, broccoli, strawberries, grapefruit. Much of the produce that is distributed through the Camarillo food pantries comes from neighboring orchards and fields. Rather than simply discarding the produce that isn't harvested, growers donate it to Food Share, Ventura County's regional food bank. But how it actually gets from fields into the grocery bags of the needy is the key. Several times a week, Food Share volunteers meet at 8 a.m.
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