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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008
Regarding your article about the toy piano ["Plaything for the Serious Player," by Rick Schultz, Nov. 9], I recall during a visit to the original Motown studio-museum in Detroit years ago that among the battered equipment was a toy piano. The lady who ran the place, Esther Gordy Edwards, proudly pointed out that in 1965, writer-producer Brian Holland had played it on a No. 1 record, the Supremes' "I Hear a Symphony." You can play your old single and hear for yourself. Jim Dawson Hollywood
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 27, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court's new champion of the 4th Amendment, is likely to play a crucial role Tuesday when the court hears this year's most important search case: whether the police may routinely examine the digital contents of a cellphone confiscated during an arrest. Civil libertarians say the stakes are high because arrests are so common - 13.1 million were made in 2010, according to the FBI - and smartphones hold so much private information. Under current law, officers may search a person under arrest, checking pockets and looking through a wallet or purse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1987 | CONNIE JOHNSON
There's nothing like a tell-all book and the public's willingness to cheer on the underdog to put a rock icon solidly back on the comeback trail. It worked for Tina Turner, and judging by the enthusiastic response Mary Wilson drew from a full house at the Roxy on Tuesday, it's working for the former Supreme. Wilson's career probably should have collapsed the day Diana Ross left the Supremes, since Wilson's role within that popular '60s group was minimal by comparison.
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Laura W. Brill
Last year's Proposition 8 ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court changed the lives of many same-sex couples and their families in California for the better. But the political fallout from that decision is also having a profound and worrisome effect on the state's initiative process. The reason has to do with the nature of the court's action. The Supreme Court did not rule on the constitutionality of Proposition 8 itself. Rather, it decided an issue of standing, concluding that the initiative's backers had not been directly harmed by a lower-court ruling that the law was unconstitutional and that they therefore lacked standing to appeal that ruling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1997
The headline "High Court Restricts Damages for Brutality" (April 29) should read "Paranoid Supreme Court Condones Police Brutality." GEORGE MARGO Malibu
OPINION
June 29, 1997
It is now clear: There are small claims courts, which should not to be confused with the Small Minds Court, a.k.a. the U.S. Supreme Court. D. A. PAPANASTASSIOU Pasadena
OPINION
August 26, 2005
Re "Nominee's Memos Critical of Gender-Equality Efforts," Aug. 19 If it is a "staggeringly pernicious" idea to pay women as much as men for work that is comparable to that of men, then it is equally staggeringly pernicious to approve the appointment of the bigot John G. Roberts Jr. to the U.S. Supreme Court. President Bush has insulted all women in putting this man forward. MARCIA J. BATES Van Nuys
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Elena Howe, Los Angeles Times
It's not often that an oppressive dictator sits down with the free Western press and openly answers probing questions about his rule, his crimes against humanity and his fashion choices - those last two often being one and the same. It's even rarer for such a tyrant to sit down with the entertainment section of the free press, but hey, who are we to look a good interview in the bushy-bearded mouth? While Adm. Gen. Shabazz Aladeen of the small North African nation of Wadiya didn't physically sit across from us (in fact, for all we know this email interview could have been answered by some wiseguy comedian - say, Sacha Baron Cohen, whose movie "The Dictator" opens May 16)
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just another tragedy in family court. A young crack mother, desperate to conceal her pregnancy, had locked herself in a tenement bathroom and given birth to a three-pound boy. As she pushed, he fell to the floor and broke his skull. The mother abandoned him, like she had two previous babies. All were born addicted to crack. "Can we do anything about this woman?" asks Judge Judith Sheindlin, her voice taut with anger.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2008 | Nicholas Riccardi, Riccardi is a Times staff writer.
In June, leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints made a fateful decision. They called on California Mormons to donate their time and money to the campaign for Proposition 8, which would overturn a state Supreme Court ruling that permitted gay marriage. That push helped the initiative win narrow passage on election day. And it has made the Mormon Church, which for years has striven to be seen as part of the American mainstream, a political target.
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Given the danger posed by drunk or reckless drivers, police should follow up on information - even information from an anonymous source - that a vehicle might be careening down a street or threatening other motorists and pedestrians. If they confirm that is the case, they should stop the vehicle. But that isn't what happened in a California case decided by the Supreme Court last week. The court's ruling makes it too easy for police to stop motorists on the basis of an anonymous tip. In 2008, a 911 dispatch team in Mendocino County received a report that a pickup truck had forced another vehicle off the road, giving rise to a concern that the driver might be drunk.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before analyzing the Redskins' 2014 schedule. The Skinny: Sorry we are a little late today. Had to jump on the HBO/Amazon story and make sure that was in our roundup. Other stories include recaps of Aereo's big day at the Supreme Court and Comcast and Charter are trying to work on a deal to swap and sell some cable systems. Daily Dose: The NFL will unveil its fall schedule this evening. Things to watch for will be what games CBS gets for its new Thursday package.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Victims of child pornography whose images of sexual abuse have circulated on the Internet may claim damages from every person caught with illegal images, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. But justices rejected the idea that a single person who possesses such images may be assessed the full amount due to the victim, setting aside a $3.4-million verdict against a Texas man in a favor of a woman whose childhood rape was photographed and widely circulated on the Internet.
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Even as the United States continues its historic move toward fairness and equity for gay people, antiquated anti-sodomy laws remain on the books in a dozen states. Theoretically, these laws were rendered unenforceable by the Supreme Court's 2003 ruling in Lawrence vs. Texas, but apparently not everyone has received that message. In the Lawrence case, the court declared that state laws banning consensual same-sex relations were unconstitutional. Yet somehow, between 2011 and 2014, 12 men were arrested in East Baton Rouge Parish in Louisiana under the state's remaining anti-sodomy laws.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Victims of child pornography whose images of sexual abuse have circulated on the Internet may demand compensation from every person caught downloading and possessing the illegal images, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. But justices set aside a $3.4-million restitution order handed down against a Texas man on behalf of one victim, ruling that a single defendant who possesses the pornography may not be forced to pay the full amount of damages due the victim. The 5-4 decision upholds part of the Violence Against Women Act and opens a new chapter in compensating victims who say the online circulation of their images has forced them to relive the sexual abuse they experienced as children.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before hearing about the Aereo case at the Supreme Court. The Skinny: The Supreme Court on Tuesday morning will hear arguments in the ABC vs. Aereo case. Aereo is an Internet startup that broadcasters charge steal their signals. Alas, I won't be there, but I have a high court story for you anyway. When I was based in Washington, I occasionally covered the Supreme Court. You have to dress nice and they will wake you if you doze off. Other stories in Tuesday's Fix include Netflix saying it will raise prices and Comcast posting its second-quarter results.
MAGAZINE
July 23, 1989 | JOY HOROWITZ, Joy Horowitz's last story for this magazine was "Dr. Amnio."
REMEMBERING HER DAYS AS A young girl--"No one would have accused me of being a happy child"--Leslie Abramson has an enduring memory of her favorite means of escape. After school, at the corner luncheonette, she'd buy button candies and chocolate marshmallow twists (two for a nickel) and spend hours at the comic-book racks, reading. Mad magazine was good for a giggle. But it was the spooky stuff, the horror comics like "Tales From the Crypt," that she really loved. And hated, too.
SPORTS
May 17, 1987 | THOMAS FERRARO, United Press International
Joe Paterno shifts uncomfortably on the couch of his office at Penn State University and makes a confession about his holier-than-thou image. "It scares the heck out of me," booms the hallowed football coach. "Because I know I'm not that clean. Nobody is that clean." "I don't want to appear to be any more than I am," says Paterno, now speaking in a near whisper. "And that's a good, hard-working coach who is a decent guy, a family guy, who doesn't want to cheat." "I lose my temper sometimes.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld the authority of police officers to stop cars and question drivers based on anonymous tips to hotlines. In a 5-4 decision, the justices ruled that such stops do not amount to an unreasonable search or seizure, even if the arresting officer did not observe the vehicle speeding or swerving. The decision affirms a ruling of the California courts. The case began in August 2008 when a 911 dispatch team in Mendocino County received a midafternoon report that a pickup truck had forced another vehicle off the road.
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
The Supreme Court upheld Michigan's ban on affirmative action on Tuesday. The 6-2 decision, as The Times' David Savage explains, “clears away constitutional challenges to the state bans on affirmative action, which began in California in 1996.” From Savage's article : “Justice Anthony Kennedy, speaking for the majority, said the democratic process can decide such issues. 'This case is not about how the debate about racial preferences should be resolved,' he said. 'It is about who may resolve it. There is no authority in the Constitution of the United States or in this court's precedents for the judiciary to set aside Michigan laws that commit this policy determination to the voters.'” This is what The Times editorial board argued in October when it opined on the case: “This case isn't about whether state universities may provide preferential treatment in their admissions policies.
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