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WORLD
July 9, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - The power struggle between Egypt's president and military leaders is becoming increasingly murky, leaving many Egyptians confused over who is running the country and whether laws and court rulings even apply amid the persistent political disarray. The struggle is driven by newly elected Islamist President Mohamed Morsi's attempt to weaken the secular army's grip on a country it has controlled for six decades. Morsi is determined to herald an era of political Islam, which the generals view as a threat to Egypt's international stature as well as to their personal and business interests.
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WORLD
August 18, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim and Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO - The leader of Egypt's military declared Sunday that he would not tolerate further violence as his security forces moved to suppress any fresh street protests after bloody days that saw more than 800 people killed, many of them supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted President Mohamed Morsi. The Islamist movement that ruled Egypt for a year until it was toppled by the military last month faced a defining moment as hundreds more of its members were arrested, with the interim government freezing its financial assets and vilifying it as a terrorist organization.
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WORLD
December 2, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egypt's highest court Sunday postponed ruling on the legitimacy of the constitutional assembly after judges accused Islamist supporters of President Mohamed Morsi of blocking their chambers in a deepening struggle over the country's political future. About 2,000 protesters rallied in front of the Supreme Constitutional Court, which was expected to defy a decree by Morsi and rule against the assembly's authority to write the nation's new charter. The case has heightened political divisions and created a backlash against judges connected to the deposed government of longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak.
WORLD
July 4, 2013 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Ingy Hassieb
The army pushed Egypt's first democratically elected president from power after days of massive street protests, acting swiftly to remove the Islamist leader in favor of a coalition government and calling for new elections to bring stability to this deeply polarized nation. President Mohamed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood party, in power just a year, remained defiant, insisting that they continued to be Egypt's legitimate authority. Some of Morsi's supporters threatened violent retaliation, but the Islamists appeared to be overwhelmed by tanks in the boulevards and hundreds of thousands of protesters streaming through villages and cities.
WORLD
June 26, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - A move by Egypt's ruling generals to revive martial law was blunted Tuesday by a court that struck down a government decree that had allowed soldiers and military intelligence services to arrest civilians during the nation's political turmoil. The decision by an administrative court, which followed an outcry from human rights groups, was a rebuke to the ruling generals, who have tightened their hold on the country to prevent newly elected Islamist President Mohamed Morsi from accumulating power.
WORLD
June 2, 2013 | By Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO - Egypt's highest court ruled Sunday that both the country's upper house of parliament and the committee that drafted the nation's constitution had been elected illegally, but the impact of the decision appeared to be largely technical. “The ruling,” lawyer Khaled Abu Bakr said, “has no actual effect on the ground.” The Supreme Constitutional Court was acting in response to lawsuits filed against both the upper house, known as the Shura Council, and the 100-member constitutional committee.
WORLD
November 28, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif
CAIRO -- Egypt's highest court Wednesday went on the offensive against President Mohamed Morsi, saying it would not be intimidated by “blackmail” and indicating it would soon rule on whether to dissolve the Islamist-led constitutional assembly, which Morsi has vowed to protect. The comments by the Supreme Constitutional Court increased the pressure in the struggle over the separation of powers and set the country on unpredictable legal and political terrain. Street protests against the president echoed across the nation as Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood requested that the army guard its offices, which have been ransacked and burned in several cities.
WORLD
December 18, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egypt's public prosecutor, appointed by President Mohamed Morsi last month, resigned from his post Monday amid ongoing tension between the nation's judiciary and the president. Talaat Ibrahim submitted his resignation to the Supreme Judiciary Council, according to the state-run news agency. The council said it would deliberate Sunday on whether to accept the resignation. Members of the Judges Club and the nation's judiciary have been furious with Morsi since he decreed Nov. 22 that an Islamist-led assembly writing the nation's draft constitution was immune from judicial oversight.
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- Egypt's highest court postponed ruling on a case against the constitutional assembly after Islamist supporters of President Mohamed Morsi blocked judges Sunday from entering their chambers in an escalating struggle over the nation's political charter. Protesters rallied in front of the Supreme Constitutional Court, which was expected to rule on the legitimacy of the constitutional assembly in defiance of Morsi's decree that the assembly was not subject to judicial oversight.
WORLD
June 29, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
Los Angeles Times CAIRO - President-elect Mohamed Morsi of Egypt joined tens of thousands of protesters in Tahrir Square on Friday to celebrate his victory and keep pressure on the nation's ruling generals to restore the parliament and hand power over to a civilian government. Morsi's appearance in the sweltering square defied the ruling military council and came before his scheduled swearing-in Saturday as the first freely elected president in the country's history. But much of his authority has been curtailed by an army that has seized legislative and executive powers to prevent Islamists from controlling the government.
WORLD
July 4, 2013 | By Alexandra Sandels and Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - The military coup that toppled Egypt's Islamist president has divided the Middle East between those who see the move as a broadside against pious Muslims and those who view it as a triumph for secular values. Divisions have also played out according to political and regional loyalties. The fall of President Mohamed Morsi, who was democratically elected, spelled the demise of the Muslim Brotherhood's political power in Egypt, and the Islamist movement's regional allies were furious.
WORLD
July 4, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO -- Egypt swore in an interim leader Thursday after a military coup toppled the country's first freely elected president, raising fresh uncertainty over the formation of a coalition government to ease deep political divisions and prevent economic collapse. Judge Adly Mahmoud Mansour, head of the Supreme Constitutional Court, took the oath of the presidency in a court chamber along the Nile. He replaced Mohamed Morsi, the nation's first Islamist president, who was forced from office after refusing a military order to compromise with the opposition to end months of unrest.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | By Daniel Rothberg
After days of intense protesting and mounting opposition, Egypt's military ousted the nation's democratically elected leader, President Mohamed Morsi, who criticized the move as a “complete military coup.” In doing so, the military also scrapped the constitution and appointed the head of the Supreme Constitutional Court as acting president. The move came in response to Egyptians who, for days, have been calling for Morsi's resignation. Robert Satloff, executive director of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, writes that Morsi's ouster affords President Obama the rare opportunity to avoid making the same mistake twice.
WORLD
June 2, 2013 | By Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO - Egypt's highest court ruled Sunday that both the country's upper house of parliament and the committee that drafted the nation's constitution had been elected illegally, but the impact of the decision appeared to be largely technical. “The ruling,” lawyer Khaled Abu Bakr said, “has no actual effect on the ground.” The Supreme Constitutional Court was acting in response to lawsuits filed against both the upper house, known as the Shura Council, and the 100-member constitutional committee.
WORLD
December 18, 2012 | By Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egypt's public prosecutor, appointed by President Mohamed Morsi last month, resigned from his post Monday amid ongoing tension between the nation's judiciary and the president. Talaat Ibrahim submitted his resignation to the Supreme Judiciary Council, according to the state-run news agency. The council said it would deliberate Sunday on whether to accept the resignation. Members of the Judges Club and the nation's judiciary have been furious with Morsi since he decreed Nov. 22 that an Islamist-led assembly writing the nation's draft constitution was immune from judicial oversight.
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- Egypt's highest court postponed ruling on a case against the constitutional assembly after Islamist supporters of President Mohamed Morsi blocked judges Sunday from entering their chambers in an escalating struggle over the nation's political charter. Protesters rallied in front of the Supreme Constitutional Court, which was expected to rule on the legitimacy of the constitutional assembly in defiance of Morsi's decree that the assembly was not subject to judicial oversight.
WORLD
July 4, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO -- Egypt swore in an interim leader Thursday after a military coup toppled the country's first freely elected president, raising fresh uncertainty over the formation of a coalition government to ease deep political divisions and prevent economic collapse. Judge Adly Mahmoud Mansour, head of the Supreme Constitutional Court, took the oath of the presidency in a court chamber along the Nile. He replaced Mohamed Morsi, the nation's first Islamist president, who was forced from office after refusing a military order to compromise with the opposition to end months of unrest.
WORLD
July 11, 2012 | Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif
The power struggle between Egypt's newly elected Islamist president and the military has escalated, with lawmakers defying a court order and reconvening the dissolved parliament, marking another disturbing political twist over the future of a nation still tangled in the legacy of Hosni Mubarak. The Islamist-dominated parliament's brief session Tuesday was a symbolic victory for President Mohamed Morsi, who had ordered it to meet despite a recent court ruling that disbanded the chamber because of electoral violations.
WORLD
December 2, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egypt's highest court Sunday postponed ruling on the legitimacy of the constitutional assembly after judges accused Islamist supporters of President Mohamed Morsi of blocking their chambers in a deepening struggle over the country's political future. About 2,000 protesters rallied in front of the Supreme Constitutional Court, which was expected to defy a decree by Morsi and rule against the assembly's authority to write the nation's new charter. The case has heightened political divisions and created a backlash against judges connected to the deposed government of longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak.
WORLD
November 28, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif
CAIRO -- Egypt's highest court Wednesday went on the offensive against President Mohamed Morsi, saying it would not be intimidated by “blackmail” and indicating it would soon rule on whether to dissolve the Islamist-led constitutional assembly, which Morsi has vowed to protect. The comments by the Supreme Constitutional Court increased the pressure in the struggle over the separation of powers and set the country on unpredictable legal and political terrain. Street protests against the president echoed across the nation as Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood requested that the army guard its offices, which have been ransacked and burned in several cities.
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