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Supreme Court Elections

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OPINION
November 2, 1986
I applaud your paper's (inevitably unpopular) stance. I also have reservations about Chief Justice Bird; however, as a lawyer, I have very strong feelings about the need for a genuinely independent judiciary--whether at the trial level or the Supreme Court level--and the focus of the current Supreme Court "campaign" and the rhetoric it has generated have missed the point entirely. If the separation of powers is going to mean anything, it must include the right of judges to make unpopular decisions, free from the pressures of politics, and the ability to take the long view of things.
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NATIONAL
January 4, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Montana has engaged in a long, slow dance between corporations and politicians through much of its history. The free-spending audacity of the copper kings during the early 20th century — when mining czar W.A. Clark bought himself a seat in the U.S. Senate — are the stuff of Western lore. In an attempt to fight back, Montana voters in 1912 passed an initiative barring direct corporate contributions to political candidates and parties — a law that, like those in many states across the country, was undone by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2010.
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NATIONAL
April 6, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
An election that was seen as a referendum on Republican Gov. Scott Walker's efforts to curb union power in Wisconsin remained unresolved, with a Democratic-backed challenger to a conservative state Supreme Court justice ahead by 204 votes, setting the stage for a recount and even more partisan battles. Challenger JoAnne Kloppenburg, an assistant attorney general, declared victory Wednesday, even though the margin in the unofficial count was .01% of the nearly 1.5 million votes cast.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
An election that was seen as a referendum on Republican Gov. Scott Walker's efforts to curb union power in Wisconsin remained unresolved, with a Democratic-backed challenger to a conservative state Supreme Court justice ahead by 204 votes, setting the stage for a recount and even more partisan battles. Challenger JoAnne Kloppenburg, an assistant attorney general, declared victory Wednesday, even though the margin in the unofficial count was .01% of the nearly 1.5 million votes cast.
NATIONAL
January 4, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Montana has engaged in a long, slow dance between corporations and politicians through much of its history. The free-spending audacity of the copper kings during the early 20th century — when mining czar W.A. Clark bought himself a seat in the U.S. Senate — are the stuff of Western lore. In an attempt to fight back, Montana voters in 1912 passed an initiative barring direct corporate contributions to political candidates and parties — a law that, like those in many states across the country, was undone by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2010.
OPINION
September 14, 2004 | Richard L. Hasen
There are many nightmare scenarios out there about what could happen on election day. An electoral college tie. An electronic voting glitch in a state that has moved to a new voting system. A call for a recount in a state like Ohio that still uses punch cards. A disruption by a terrorist group. Thinking about such scenarios is fair game after the 2000 debacle, in which the outcome was decided in mid-December after intervention by the U.S. Supreme Court.
OPINION
September 14, 2004 | Richard L. Hasen
There are many nightmare scenarios out there about what could happen on election day. An electoral college tie. An electronic voting glitch in a state that has moved to a new voting system. A call for a recount in a state like Ohio that still uses punch cards. A disruption by a terrorist group. Thinking about such scenarios is fair game after the 2000 debacle, in which the outcome was decided in mid-December after intervention by the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
December 21, 2000 | David G. Savage and Henry Weinstein, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the week since the Supreme Court handed down its decision on the presidential race, the ruling has attracted harsh criticism from many legal scholars and passionate defenses from others. Critics say the five justices in the majority decided what result they wanted to reach--an end to ballot recounts--and then cobbled together a weak rationale to get there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2000 | CAROLINE R. MILTON, Caroline Milton is a member of Freethinkers of Ventura County (http://members.aol.com/frthvc.html)
While attending a local government meeting last month, I stood by as a preacher was summoned to the podium to deliver a public prayer. After asking everyone to bow their heads, the celebrant solicited divine support for the elected leaders on the dais.
OPINION
November 2, 1986
Your editorial (Oct. 20), "Support for the Justices," broke this camel's back. You speak about California Supreme Court judges as if they were some inanimate historical relic to be preserved at any cost, with flaws and cracks remaining unchecked. These judges need to heed the majority's wishes. They are not a far-removed entity making decisions unto themselves. Their decisions impact all of us--often in matters of life or death. Theirs is not a salon of old for tea and philosophical discussion but for protection of real people, including victims of heinous crimes.
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