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Supreme Court U S Rulings

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BUSINESS
October 3, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Lincoln Savings & Loan boss Charles H. Keating Jr. won a final victory Monday before the U.S. Supreme Court, defeating attempts to reinstate his 1991 state court conviction on charges of swindling elderly investors. Without comment, the high court refused to reopen the case, leaving intact lower court rulings that Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lance Ito had allowed a flawed prosecution.
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NEWS
December 11, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday added a new uncertainty to the debate over student-led prayers at public school events, as the justices let stand a Jacksonville, Fla., school board policy that allows high school seniors to elect a fellow student to deliver a "message" at graduation ceremonies. After the Supreme Court in 1992 struck down school-sponsored prayers at graduation ceremonies, Jacksonville adopted a policy that allowed students, rather than school officials, to decide the issue.
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SPORTS
December 13, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, in a key ruling supporting the enforcement powers of the National Collegiate Athletic Assn., ruled Monday that the organization may force Nevada Las Vegas to suspend its highly successful basketball coach, Jerry Tarkanian, for recruiting violations and other irregularities. On a 5-4 vote, the high court said that the NCAA does not have to follow the same constitutional guidelines that cover government agencies in investigating violations of regulations.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2001 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for companies that develop genetically modified plants, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that seeds and seed-grown plants can be patented. The 6-2 ruling, which upheld a court of appeals decision, strengthens the intellectual property rights of the nation's largest seed biotechnology companies. If these protections had been struck down, companies such as DuPont, Monsanto Co.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Tuesday overturned the death sentence of a mentally disturbed murderer who was being forcibly medicated by Louisiana prison officials so that he could be executed. The case of Michael Owen Perry has been the most closely watched death penalty case of the current term because it tested the willingness of the court's dominant conservatives to uphold executions.
NEWS
January 12, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a setback for the government's effort to police money laundering, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that a person cannot be convicted of a crime just for deliberately skirting a requirement to report cash transactions of $10,000 or more. Instead, a prosecutor must prove that the person knew he was violating the law by breaking up the transactions into lesser amounts to avoid having them reported to the government. The 5-4 decision throws out the conviction of a Portland, Ore.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday declined to recognize a constitutional right to own machine guns sought by the National Rifle Assn., which had described a lower court's ruling in the matter as "the first ban on firearms possession by law-abiding citizens in American history." Without dissent, the high court let stand an appeals court ruling which upheld a 1986 federal law banning the manufacture, sale or ownership of new machine guns except by police or government agencies.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | DAVID SAVAGE and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ruling that sends the Rodney G. King police beating case back to Los Angeles for at least one more hearing, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously found Thursday that King's "misconduct" and the burden of a double trial justified the lenient, 30-month sentences imposed on two officers found guilty of violating his civil rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected appeals by a divorced Los Angeles couple who, after years of ferocious litigation, managed to agree on one thing--the $3 million lawyers charged to handle their breakup was much too much. In a case with elements of the Dickens novel "Bleak House" and the film "War of the Roses," the justices upheld a California appeals court ruling that the legal fees Stanley and Dorothy Diller were ordered to pay did not violate their rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1994 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than 50 years of favoring government regulation, the legal pendulum of property rights is swinging rapidly back toward the side of private landowners. Acting most recently in a case involving the proprietor of an Oregon plumbing supply store, the U.S. Supreme Court in the last seven years has progressively strengthened the rights of property owners. In the Oregon case, city officials wanted the store owner to dedicate part of her property for public improvements.
NEWS
December 4, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide an issue that goes to the heart of the current debate about state judicial elections: Do candidates for judgeships have a free-speech right to take stands on controversial issues? Two-thirds of the states, including California, elect some or all of their judges. Yet by tradition and by law, these campaigns are staid, low-key affairs.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2001 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court on Monday sidestepped a constitutional challenge to White House power to negotiate trade pacts and other international deals. Justices were being pressed to strike down the North American Free Trade Agreement because it was not endorsed by a two-thirds vote of the Senate, a constitutional requirement for treaties.
NEWS
June 26, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court came down Monday squarely on the side of the reformers who want to limit the influence of money in politics, ruling that Congress can restrict how much the political parties spend to fund their candidates. The 5-4 decision upheld party spending limits that have been part of federal law since the post-Watergate reforms of the 1970s.
NEWS
June 26, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proponents of campaign finance reform said their cause was strengthened by Monday's Supreme Court ruling that parties can be restricted in how much money they give candidates. But reform advocates still may fall short of their ultimate goal--strict new contribution rules. Indeed, the ruling came at a time when their bid to enact the most far-reaching reform legislation in a generation appears increasingly uncertain.
NEWS
June 12, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The police cannot use heat detectors and other such high-tech devices to look inside a person's home, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. In a surprisingly strong defense of the right to privacy, the court threw out drug evidence against an Oregon man who was growing marijuana in his house and ruled that law enforcement agents violated his rights by using a thermal imager on a public street to spot his hothouse.
NEWS
June 12, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court strengthened the free-speech rights of religious groups Monday, ruling that a Christian youth group must be permitted to hold an after-school Bible study class in a public elementary school. Because officials in a small central New York town had allowed civic and social groups to use their school buildings, they also must open their doors to the Bible study group, the justices said in a 6-3 ruling.
NEWS
February 22, 1995 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a climax to the six-year legal struggle over Proposition 103, the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected the insurance industry's challenge to California regulations implementing the 1988 rate-cutting initiative. The action, upholding a unanimous California Supreme Court decision last August, clears the way for California auto insurance policyholders to receive rebates of more than $2 billion--about $200 apiece--for premiums paid in 1988 and 1989. "No more excuses. No more delays.
NEWS
May 19, 1987 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
Expanding the scope of the nation's civil rights laws, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that Jews, Arabs and others who suffer discrimination based on their "ancestry" are protected under statutes barring racial discrimination. In two unanimous decisions, the justices concluded that Congress in the original 1866 Civil Rights Act intended not only to protect blacks but also immigrants and others who suffer because of their nationality or appearance.
SPORTS
June 5, 2001 | From Associated Press
Ford Olinger isn't ready to claim victory over the U.S. Golf Assn. after a Supreme Court ruling Monday, but he feels it's pretty close. "Until I see it in writing from the appellate court saying, 'OK, Ford, you win,' we still have to hold a little skepticism," said Olinger, who has a degenerative condition in both hips. "But we're definitely glad that Casey [Martin] won, and it's looking a lot better for us." The Supreme Court on Monday threw out a decision by the 7th U.S.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court opened the door Monday to larger verdicts against employers who are found guilty of job discrimination, ruling that they may be forced to pay a worker's future salary as well as damages for their past misconduct. The unanimous ruling is a victory for workers, but employment lawyers described it as more of a clarification than a surprising change in the law.
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