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January 17, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a frustrating end to a closely watched software case, the Supreme Court announced Tuesday that it could not decide the question of whether the basic "menu commands" that drive a program can be copyrighted. Lawyers for Lotus Development, backed by such corporate giants as Xerox, Intel and Digital Equipment, argued that computer software can be copyrighted in its entirety, including the basic commands that drive a program.
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BUSINESS
January 17, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a frustrating end to a closely watched software case, the Supreme Court announced Tuesday that it could not decide the question of whether the basic "menu commands" that drive a program can be copyrighted. Lawyers for Lotus Development, backed by such corporate giants as Xerox, Intel and Digital Equipment, argued that computer software can be copyrighted in its entirety, including the basic commands that drive a program.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1991 | SAMUEL H. PILLSBURY, Samuel H. Pillsbury is professor of law and Rains Fellow at Loyola Law School.
Like many government officials, judges do not always mean what they say. Or say what they really mean. Sometimes the gap between words and truth can be laid to poor expression, or the compromise of conflicting values. But more often it masks a dangerous truth. In its recent decision on searches aboard buses, the Supreme Court insists that it has not changed constitutional law. By use of the legal fiction of consent, however, the court may have diminished the real freedom of traveling Americans.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an effort to remove her department from an embarrassing legal flap over child pornography, U.S. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno told the Supreme Court Thursday that the Clinton Administration no longer will side with a Pennsylvania man who was prosecuted for purchasing movies of scantily clad young girls.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California cities and counties may owe their employees as much as $2 billion for unpaid overtime work, under a ruling the Supreme Court let stand Tuesday. Los Angeles County officials said the ruling affects 23,000 of its 78,000 full-time employees and could cost the county $170 million. The decision covers all public employees who may have been considered exempt from overtime pay but whose wages can be docked if they miss a few hours of work.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an effort to remove her department from an embarrassing legal flap over child pornography, U.S. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno told the Supreme Court Thursday that the Clinton Administration no longer will side with a Pennsylvania man who was prosecuted for purchasing movies of scantily clad young girls.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California cities and counties may owe their employees as much as $2 billion for unpaid overtime work, under a ruling the Supreme Court let stand Tuesday. Los Angeles County officials said the ruling affects 23,000 of its 78,000 full-time employees and could cost the county $170 million. The decision covers all public employees whov may have been considered exempt from overtime pay but whose wages can be docked if they miss a few hours of work.
NEWS
March 6, 1985
A federal judge granted an indefinite stay for one of two killers scheduled to die today in Florida's electric chair as attorneys for the second man took his appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. U.S. District Judge Alcee Hastings stayed the execution of William Middleton Jr. to allow time for a hearing on whether Middleton's civil rights were violated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1985
Are our elected officials "for" or "against" imposing the will of Californians? As an ordinary, middle-class citizen, with a fair amount of intelligence and common sense, I believe Proposition 8, "The Victims' Bill of Rights" explicitly states what the majority of Californians want in the way of protecting our lives and property. The only tool I have available to convey my wishes and beliefs on how this government is run is through my vote. I am a diligent and responsible voter, but each time I vote I find the Supreme Court telling us they cannot impose our wishes because of some technicality in the wording of initiatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1999
Re Dana Parsons' column "Tustin Schools' Zero Tolerance Adds Hypocrisy" (Oct. 8): The continuing debate over "zero tolerance" demonstrates the obvious need for clarification. No one seems to have decided on a definition on which all can agree. In the Tustin Unified School District, zero tolerance is confined to the following four specific areas: (1) While on school grounds; (2) while going to or coming from school; (3) during lunch period whether on or off campus; and (4) during or while going to or from a school-sponsored activity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1991 | SAMUEL H. PILLSBURY, Samuel H. Pillsbury is professor of law and Rains Fellow at Loyola Law School.
Like many government officials, judges do not always mean what they say. Or say what they really mean. Sometimes the gap between words and truth can be laid to poor expression, or the compromise of conflicting values. But more often it masks a dangerous truth. In its recent decision on searches aboard buses, the Supreme Court insists that it has not changed constitutional law. By use of the legal fiction of consent, however, the court may have diminished the real freedom of traveling Americans.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California cities and counties may owe their employees as much as $2 billion for unpaid overtime work, under a ruling the Supreme Court let stand Tuesday. Los Angeles County officials said the ruling affects 23,000 of its 78,000 full-time employees and could cost the county $170 million. The decision covers all public employees whov may have been considered exempt from overtime pay but whose wages can be docked if they miss a few hours of work.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California cities and counties may owe their employees as much as $2 billion for unpaid overtime work, under a ruling the Supreme Court let stand Tuesday. Los Angeles County officials said the ruling affects 23,000 of its 78,000 full-time employees and could cost the county $170 million. The decision covers all public employees who may have been considered exempt from overtime pay but whose wages can be docked if they miss a few hours of work.
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | Associated Press
The Constitution does not protect Rep. Dan Rostenkowski (D-Ill.) from prosecution on charges of political corruption, a federal judge ruled Friday. Rostenkowski's appeal of that ruling could delay any trial for several months, and more than a year if the matter goes to the Supreme Court. U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson turned aside defense arguments that the government's case was an unprecedented intrusion on Congress' constitutional authority to police its own rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1989
In your editorial ("The Long Line," March 28) you are both right and wrong when you comment on the history of abortion in this country. In stating that abortion has been legal for much of our nation's 200 years you are correct. But you fail to explain one crucial detail. Abortion has always been legal to save a woman's life. With the Supreme Court decision in 1973, abortion became legal on demand for any reason. That gives a completely different view to the situation. I must also challenge your statement that abortion "remained a common and highly visible practice well into the 19th Century" and that the "law that did seek to regulate it did so to protect pregnant women from the dangerous abortion techniques of the time."
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