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June 20, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court blocked restaurant owners from suing American Express over high fees Thursday, the latest in a series of 5-4 rulings have barred class-action claims against big corporations. The majority agreed individual restaurant owners could not afford the nearly $1 million cost of bringing an antitrust claim against Amex. But they ruled that an arbitration clause prevents the restaurant owners from joining together to sue. “The antitrust laws do not guarantee an affordable path to the vindication of every claim,” said Justice Antonin Scalia.
December 12, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer said Monday that she welcomed the Supreme Court's decision to hear arguments about the state's controversial illegal immigration law. "I am confident the high court will uphold Arizona's constitutional authority and obligation to protect the safety and welfare of its citizens," she said in a statement. "This case is not just about Arizona. It's about every state grappling with the costs of illegal immigration. And it's about the fundamental principle of federalism, under which these states have a right to defend their people.
December 11, 2013 | By Mark Magnier and Tanvi Sharma
NEW DELHI - In a reversal that surprised many gay activists and flew in the face of changes seen in some other countries recently, India's Supreme Court on Wednesday overturned a lower-court ruling, in effect making homosexuality a crime again. The nation's top court overturned a 2009 Delhi High Court decision that decriminalized homosexual sex between consenting adults. In Wednesday's ruling, the top court argued that the lower court had overstepped its mandate and had no right to augment the law. “It is up to parliament to legislate on this issue," said Justice G.S. Singhvi, who headed the two-judge Supreme Court bench.
July 16, 2012 | By Morgan Little
What a difference a single court decision can make. In the wake of the Supreme Court's monumental decision on President Obama's healthcare reform law, Republican opinions of the court and Chief Justice John G. Roberts have plummeted, while Democrats now view both more favorably, according to a new Gallup poll . The court's 5-4 decision held that the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate was constitutional when defined as a tax. It was...
September 28, 2011 | By James Oliphant
The Obama administration is asking the Supreme Court to rule on the constitutionality of the federal healthcare overhaul sooner rather than later, with the Justice Department announcing that it will file a petition Wednesday asking the court to take the case. The department is appealing from a decision last month by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Atlanta that held that the requirement under the Affordable Care Act that all Americans purchase health insurance is unconstitutional.
June 11, 2012 | By David G. Savage
Washington - The Supreme Court made clear Monday it is not willing to closely review the claims of the remaining Guantanamo Bay detainees, as the justices turned down appeals from seven inmates without comment. The court has left it to the Obama administration and federal judges in Washington to decide whether the detainees can be held indefinitely as military prisoners. Advocates for the detainees said they were disappointed. “The court has effectively abandoned its commitment to ensuring that individuals held in long-term detention at Guantanamo obtain meaningful review of their imprisonment,” said Jonathan Hafetz, a law professor at Seton Hall University in New Jersey.
June 14, 2013 | By Amina Khan
While the Supreme Court's decision to forbid patents on human genes knocked out Myriad Genetics' long-guarded patent on two genes linked to breast cancer, the Utah-based company's stock still rose soon after the news broke. That bit of investor optimism may have been due to the court's decision to allow patenting of cDNA, which they called "synthetically created" - though it's unclear if that optimism is warranted, doctors pointed out. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously that although "naturally occurring" DNA like the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 could not be patented, the company could still patent the cDNA version of these two genes, classifying those as man-made products.
November 26, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
To no one's profound surprise, the Supreme Court has agreed to take up the question of whether the Affordable Care Act's mandate that health plans cover contraceptives violates the religious freedom of some corporations. The court accepted two cases brought by families that contend their religious objections to certain contraceptives flow through to their family companies, and therefore can be imposed on their employees. Anticipating that the issue would land in the laps of the Big Nine, we examined the issue back in October.
March 26, 2012 | By Ian Duncan
The twin Vermont marble statues Contemplation of Justice and Guardian of Law stood watch over a makeshift encampment at the bottom of the Supreme Court steps today, as the sun rose on the first day of arguments in a historic case on the Obama administration's healthcare law. The encampment was for people hoping for a seat in the court's public gallery, some of whom have been waiting in line since Friday. The spectators who will sit in on today's arguments were ushered in around 7:30 am EST, but many elected to wait another day to get a seat when the court is scheduled to address the constitutionality of the law's so-called individual mandate.
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