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NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that police officers may enter and search a home without a warrant as long as one occupant consents, even if another resident has previously objected. The ruling -- based on a case involving a Los Angeles Police Department search -- gives the police more leeway to search homes without obtaining a warrant, even in situations where there is no emergency. The case began with a lawsuit filed by Walter Fernandez, a Los Angeles man who was arrested in 2009 as a suspect in a street robbery and taken from his home to the police station.
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NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Morgan Little
What a difference a single court decision can make. In the wake of the Supreme Court's monumental decision on President Obama's healthcare reform law, Republican opinions of the court and Chief Justice John G. Roberts have plummeted, while Democrats now view both more favorably, according to a new Gallup poll . The court's 5-4 decision held that the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate was constitutional when defined as a tax. It was...
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By James Oliphant
The Obama administration is asking the Supreme Court to rule on the constitutionality of the federal healthcare overhaul sooner rather than later, with the Justice Department announcing that it will file a petition Wednesday asking the court to take the case. The department is appealing from a decision last month by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Atlanta that held that the requirement under the Affordable Care Act that all Americans purchase health insurance is unconstitutional.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2012 | By David G. Savage
Washington - The Supreme Court made clear Monday it is not willing to closely review the claims of the remaining Guantanamo Bay detainees, as the justices turned down appeals from seven inmates without comment. The court has left it to the Obama administration and federal judges in Washington to decide whether the detainees can be held indefinitely as military prisoners. Advocates for the detainees said they were disappointed. “The court has effectively abandoned its commitment to ensuring that individuals held in long-term detention at Guantanamo obtain meaningful review of their imprisonment,” said Jonathan Hafetz, a law professor at Seton Hall University in New Jersey.
SCIENCE
June 14, 2013 | By Amina Khan
While the Supreme Court's decision to forbid patents on human genes knocked out Myriad Genetics' long-guarded patent on two genes linked to breast cancer, the Utah-based company's stock still rose soon after the news broke. That bit of investor optimism may have been due to the court's decision to allow patenting of cDNA, which they called "synthetically created" - though it's unclear if that optimism is warranted, doctors pointed out. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously that although "naturally occurring" DNA like the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 could not be patented, the company could still patent the cDNA version of these two genes, classifying those as man-made products.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court opened the door Monday for California raisin growers to challenge the constitutionality of a Depression-era farming law that requires them to keep part of their annual crop off the market. In a 9-0 ruling, the justices cleared the way for Marvin and Laura Horne from Fresno to argue that this “mandatory reserve” program takes away their private property without just compensation. “This is America, not a communist state,” they said upon filing their suit.
NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By Ian Duncan
The twin Vermont marble statues Contemplation of Justice and Guardian of Law stood watch over a makeshift encampment at the bottom of the Supreme Court steps today, as the sun rose on the first day of arguments in a historic case on the Obama administration's healthcare law. The encampment was for people hoping for a seat in the court's public gallery, some of whom have been waiting in line since Friday. The spectators who will sit in on today's arguments were ushered in around 7:30 am EST, but many elected to wait another day to get a seat when the court is scheduled to address the constitutionality of the law's so-called individual mandate.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court will hear an appeal Monday from breast cancer patients and medical researchers who say the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office made a mistake when it granted a Utah company an exclusive right to profit from testing genes that signal a high risk of cancer. They argue that human genes are a product of nature not subject to being patented. Simply isolating gene mutations does not transform them into a useful invention, they say. This case of patients versus patents has drawn extraordinary interest because of its potential to reshape the law on biotechnology and personalized medicine.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, rejecting the advice of the Obama administration, will consider whether to limit the federal housing discrimination law to cases of actual and proven bias against blacks or Latinos. The justices voted to hear a New Jersey city's appeal arguing it cannot be held liable for housing discrimination for redeveloping a depressed neighborhood and reducing the number of homes that are available to African Americans and Latinos. At issue is whether the Fair Housing Act forbids actions by cities or mortgage lenders that have a “discriminatory effect” on racial minorities.
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