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NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer said Monday that she welcomed the Supreme Court's decision to hear arguments about the state's controversial illegal immigration law. "I am confident the high court will uphold Arizona's constitutional authority and obligation to protect the safety and welfare of its citizens," she said in a statement. "This case is not just about Arizona. It's about every state grappling with the costs of illegal immigration. And it's about the fundamental principle of federalism, under which these states have a right to defend their people.
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NEWS
June 18, 2012 | By Paul West
WASHINGTON - With the Supreme Court's 2011-2012 term rapidly coming to a close, the release of a decision on the constitutionality of President Obama's sweeping healthcare law is imminent - but it won't be today. The justices issued their latest set of decisions on Monday morning and the healthcare ruling wasn't among them. The case is being closely monitored by both the legal and political communities, as the healthcare industry, government officials at the state and federal levels and many more.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Numbers. They're the darnedest things. Just ask Rick Perry. The GOP presidential contender, whose misfires have become part of the legend of the 2012 race, appears to have made another flub or two Friday in an interview with the Des Moines Register editorial board, getting wrong the number of justices on the Supreme Court and blanking out on the name of one justice altogether. According to reports by the Register and the Associated Press, Perry was all set to call out Justice Sonia Sotomayor, an Obama nominee, as a "activist judge" -- except he couldn't recall her name.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
As the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Wednesday over the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act, supporters and opponents of the law took to the Web to make their own case. Enacted in 1996 under a Republican Congress and Democratic President Bill Clinton, the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, defined marriage for federal purposes as a union between a man and a woman. The law also allowed states to deny legal recognition to same-sex marriages performed outside their borders and barred the federal government from recognizing same-sex marriages licensed by states.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Morgan Little
What a difference a single court decision can make. In the wake of the Supreme Court's monumental decision on President Obama's healthcare reform law, Republican opinions of the court and Chief Justice John G. Roberts have plummeted, while Democrats now view both more favorably, according to a new Gallup poll . The court's 5-4 decision held that the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate was constitutional when defined as a tax. It was...
SCIENCE
June 14, 2013 | By Amina Khan
While the Supreme Court's decision to forbid patents on human genes knocked out Myriad Genetics' long-guarded patent on two genes linked to breast cancer, the Utah-based company's stock still rose soon after the news broke. That bit of investor optimism may have been due to the court's decision to allow patenting of cDNA, which they called "synthetically created" - though it's unclear if that optimism is warranted, doctors pointed out. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously that although "naturally occurring" DNA like the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 could not be patented, the company could still patent the cDNA version of these two genes, classifying those as man-made products.
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By James Oliphant
The Obama administration is asking the Supreme Court to rule on the constitutionality of the federal healthcare overhaul sooner rather than later, with the Justice Department announcing that it will file a petition Wednesday asking the court to take the case. The department is appealing from a decision last month by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Atlanta that held that the requirement under the Affordable Care Act that all Americans purchase health insurance is unconstitutional.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2009 | David G. Savage
The Supreme Court pulled back on the "exclusionary rule" Wednesday and ruled that evidence from an illegal search can be used if a police officer made an innocent mistake. The 5-4 opinion signals that the court is ready to rethink this key rule in criminal law and restrict its reach. It will also give prosecutors and judges nationwide more leeway to make use of evidence that may have been seen as questionable before. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court opened the door Monday for California raisin growers to challenge the constitutionality of a Depression-era farming law that requires them to keep part of their annual crop off the market. In a 9-0 ruling, the justices cleared the way for Marvin and Laura Horne from Fresno to argue that this “mandatory reserve” program takes away their private property without just compensation. “This is America, not a communist state,” they said upon filing their suit.
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