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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
After taking on campaign finance with his super PAC last year, Stephen Colbert appears to have moved on to a new favorite cause: voting rights. As the host explained Wednesday night  on “The Colbert Report,” he's “personally invested in the issue because he attended the 1963 March on Washington while in his mother's womb (he even had a muffled recording of Martin Luther King's “I Have a Dream” speech to prove it). The issue is in the news at the moment, thanks to a case before the Supreme Court challenging the 1965 Voting Rights Act . “That's right, the law that banned silencing African Americans is now coming before our nation's foremost silent African American,” Colbert joked, a dig at the famously taciturn Justice Clarence Thomas.
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NATIONAL
January 6, 2014 | By David Lauter and Tim Phelps, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court on Monday put same-sex marriages on hold in Utah until a federal appeals court can rule on whether the state law banning the practice violates the Constitution. The unsigned, one-paragraph order did not spell out the court's reasoning in the case -- orders that put lower-court decisions on hold frequently do not do so. The order did not indicate any dissents. The decision will block further same-sex marriages in Utah for at least several weeks.
NEWS
June 12, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court's opinions protecting the right to free speech and public protest came back home Wednesday, prompting a judge to rule protesters have a right to carry signs on the court's marble plaza. Since 1949, Congress has made it illegal to demonstrate or to carry banners and signs on the Supreme Court's grounds, including the marble plaza in front of the court's main steps. Protesters are free to demonstrate or carry signs on the sidewalk outside the court. But U.S. District Judge Beryl Howell called the restriction on the plaza “repugnant” to the 1st Amendment and declared it unconstitutional.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer said Monday that she welcomed the Supreme Court's decision to hear arguments about the state's controversial illegal immigration law. "I am confident the high court will uphold Arizona's constitutional authority and obligation to protect the safety and welfare of its citizens," she said in a statement. "This case is not just about Arizona. It's about every state grappling with the costs of illegal immigration. And it's about the fundamental principle of federalism, under which these states have a right to defend their people.
NEWS
June 18, 2012 | By Paul West
WASHINGTON - With the Supreme Court's 2011-2012 term rapidly coming to a close, the release of a decision on the constitutionality of President Obama's sweeping healthcare law is imminent - but it won't be today. The justices issued their latest set of decisions on Monday morning and the healthcare ruling wasn't among them. The case is being closely monitored by both the legal and political communities, as the healthcare industry, government officials at the state and federal levels and many more.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Numbers. They're the darnedest things. Just ask Rick Perry. The GOP presidential contender, whose misfires have become part of the legend of the 2012 race, appears to have made another flub or two Friday in an interview with the Des Moines Register editorial board, getting wrong the number of justices on the Supreme Court and blanking out on the name of one justice altogether. According to reports by the Register and the Associated Press, Perry was all set to call out Justice Sonia Sotomayor, an Obama nominee, as a "activist judge" -- except he couldn't recall her name.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court blocked restaurant owners from suing American Express over high fees Thursday, the latest in a series of 5-4 rulings have barred class-action claims against big corporations. The majority agreed individual restaurant owners could not afford the nearly $1 million cost of bringing an antitrust claim against Amex. But they ruled that an arbitration clause prevents the restaurant owners from joining together to sue. “The antitrust laws do not guarantee an affordable path to the vindication of every claim,” said Justice Antonin Scalia.
SCIENCE
June 14, 2013 | By Amina Khan
While the Supreme Court's decision to forbid patents on human genes knocked out Myriad Genetics' long-guarded patent on two genes linked to breast cancer, the Utah-based company's stock still rose soon after the news broke. That bit of investor optimism may have been due to the court's decision to allow patenting of cDNA, which they called "synthetically created" - though it's unclear if that optimism is warranted, doctors pointed out. The Supreme Court ruled unanimously that although "naturally occurring" DNA like the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 could not be patented, the company could still patent the cDNA version of these two genes, classifying those as man-made products.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Morgan Little
What a difference a single court decision can make. In the wake of the Supreme Court's monumental decision on President Obama's healthcare reform law, Republican opinions of the court and Chief Justice John G. Roberts have plummeted, while Democrats now view both more favorably, according to a new Gallup poll . The court's 5-4 decision held that the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate was constitutional when defined as a tax. It was...
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