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OPINION
October 3, 2004
In his Sept. 28 response to a Times editorial, Rep. Tom Feeney (R-Fla.) makes an all-too-common omission when he states that the Constitution "was created to be the supreme law of the land." Article VI, Section 2, states: "This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land." Gene Barmore Huntington Beach
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OPINION
November 13, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
A bizarre act of revenge against a romantic rival was the unlikely genesis of an important debate in the Supreme Court last week about federal power, states' rights and the conduct of U.S. diplomacy. The justices were asked to overturn the conviction of Carol Anne Bond, an immigrant from Barbados who was convicted of trying to poison her best friend after she learned that the woman had been impregnated by Bond's husband. Bond stole a dangerous chemical from the laboratory where she worked and smeared it on the other woman's car door, mailbox and doorknobs.
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OPINION
March 5, 2012 | By Bruce Ackerman
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's visit to Washington has provoked a broad debate over the military and political wisdom of an attack on Iran. But so far, there has been little attention to the legal issues involved, which are crucial. American support for a preemptive strike would be a violation of both international law and the U.S. Constitution. Article II of the Constitution requires the president to "take care that the laws be faithfully executed," and Article VI says that treaties are part of the "supreme law of the land.
OPINION
July 11, 2013
Re "Prop. 8 case all about strategy," July 7 The case that ended up overturning Proposition 8 may have been "all about strategy," but it certainly was not about democracy. By a one-vote majority, the Supreme Court effectively refused to hear the case and a lower court decision stood. Thus the votes of 7 million Californians who supported Proposition 8 were thrown out - a blow to democracy. The federal district court ruling was decided by Judge Vaughn R. Walker, a gay man who should have recused himself because of his bias.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1998
In the wake of Judge Mariana Pfaelzer's opinion overturning the key provisions of Proposition 187 (March 19), I expect to hear a new flood of complaints that our votes do not count. Those making such complaints need to get a new perspective on the situation. The U.S. Constitution is the supreme law of our country and the California Constitution is the supreme law in our state (except in cases involving federal primacy). These documents include protection of certain essential rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1986
Attorney General Edwin Meese III's latest foray into legal theory finds him asserting that opinions of the Supreme Court of the United States apply only to the parties in the case in court and are not the "supreme law of the land that is binding on all persons and parts of government, henceforth and forevermore."
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | Associated Press
Parliament on Thursday passed a measure that would make the Koran the supreme law of Pakistan and subject all aspects of life to Islamic tenets. The new system of law, called sharia, will govern life in this impoverished nation of 120 million from social mores to education and the economy. It will frame laws in line with the Koran, the Muslim holy book, and the Sunna, a collection of the teachings of the Prophet Mohammed.
OPINION
November 13, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
A bizarre act of revenge against a romantic rival was the unlikely genesis of an important debate in the Supreme Court last week about federal power, states' rights and the conduct of U.S. diplomacy. The justices were asked to overturn the conviction of Carol Anne Bond, an immigrant from Barbados who was convicted of trying to poison her best friend after she learned that the woman had been impregnated by Bond's husband. Bond stole a dangerous chemical from the laboratory where she worked and smeared it on the other woman's car door, mailbox and doorknobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000
Re "Courts on Political Stage," editorial, Sept. 24: The Constitution itself provides sufficient guidance--a "litmus test," if you will--for the selection of Supreme Court justices. It declares that the Constitution is the supreme law of the land and states that all federal and state judicial officers are bound to support it. Under this standard, Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas deserve our utmost respect, because they take the language of the Constitution seriously, and they try to follow it in their decision-making, regardless of their personal beliefs.
OPINION
July 11, 2013
Re "Prop. 8 case all about strategy," July 7 The case that ended up overturning Proposition 8 may have been "all about strategy," but it certainly was not about democracy. By a one-vote majority, the Supreme Court effectively refused to hear the case and a lower court decision stood. Thus the votes of 7 million Californians who supported Proposition 8 were thrown out - a blow to democracy. The federal district court ruling was decided by Judge Vaughn R. Walker, a gay man who should have recused himself because of his bias.
OPINION
March 5, 2012 | By Bruce Ackerman
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's visit to Washington has provoked a broad debate over the military and political wisdom of an attack on Iran. But so far, there has been little attention to the legal issues involved, which are crucial. American support for a preemptive strike would be a violation of both international law and the U.S. Constitution. Article II of the Constitution requires the president to "take care that the laws be faithfully executed," and Article VI says that treaties are part of the "supreme law of the land.
OPINION
January 22, 2012
Misreading the 1st Amendment and copyright law, the Supreme Court last week made it more difficult for Americans to enjoy foreign works of art, including decades-old musical and literary masterpieces. It upheld a 1994 law implementing a treaty requiring signatory countries to extend copyright protection to works receiving protection in their countries of origin. Never mind that many of those works long had been in the public domain in the United States. The effect of the 6-2 decision, as Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg acknowledged in her opinion, will be to force those who want to publish or perform works covered by the law to pay royalties to copyright holders, even if the price is prohibitive.
OPINION
January 5, 2011
On Thursday, the Constitution of the United States in its entirety will be read aloud in the House of Representatives, courtesy of the new Republican majority. The temptation, to which we succumb, is to regard the reading as a symbolic sop to the " tea party," whose adherents carry around pocket-sized copies of the Constitution. Even so, there's no harm in a public reading of it. We only hope that those in the audience, whether tea partyers or their supporters in Congress, are willing to listen to the complete document.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2000
Re "Courts on Political Stage," editorial, Sept. 24: The Constitution itself provides sufficient guidance--a "litmus test," if you will--for the selection of Supreme Court justices. It declares that the Constitution is the supreme law of the land and states that all federal and state judicial officers are bound to support it. Under this standard, Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas deserve our utmost respect, because they take the language of the Constitution seriously, and they try to follow it in their decision-making, regardless of their personal beliefs.
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court justices, debating an anti-gang law, questioned Wednesday whether police should be given the power to arrest suspected gang members simply for standing on street corners. At issue is a novel Chicago ordinance that tells the police to arrest suspected gang members who gather in parks or on streets if they fail to disperse when ordered to do so. More than 90,000 arrests were made under the law before it was struck down by the state courts in Illinois.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1998
In the wake of Judge Mariana Pfaelzer's opinion overturning the key provisions of Proposition 187 (March 19), I expect to hear a new flood of complaints that our votes do not count. Those making such complaints need to get a new perspective on the situation. The U.S. Constitution is the supreme law of our country and the California Constitution is the supreme law in our state (except in cases involving federal primacy). These documents include protection of certain essential rights.
OPINION
January 22, 2012
Misreading the 1st Amendment and copyright law, the Supreme Court last week made it more difficult for Americans to enjoy foreign works of art, including decades-old musical and literary masterpieces. It upheld a 1994 law implementing a treaty requiring signatory countries to extend copyright protection to works receiving protection in their countries of origin. Never mind that many of those works long had been in the public domain in the United States. The effect of the 6-2 decision, as Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg acknowledged in her opinion, will be to force those who want to publish or perform works covered by the law to pay royalties to copyright holders, even if the price is prohibitive.
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