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Suraj Sharma

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NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Fred Schruers
By all accounts, director Ang Lee is the soul of civility on a film set, sure-footed but collaborative, meticulously focused but ready to smile - the patient but quietly demanding center of an adventurous array of films. Lee gives his actors directorial "notes" in muted tones, but precisely and often enough that his longtime editor, Tim Squyres, privy to the tail ends of scenes from each day's footage, assures him that his actors will sometimes react when Lee turns away: "He'll see that when I tell an actor something, very often they'll roll their eyes behind me. " It's a characteristically humble confession (or exaggerated self-deprecation?
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Cristy Lytal
For director Ang Lee's "Life of Pi," the story of a spiritual Indian boy stranded at sea with a tiger, Oscar-winning visual effects supervisor Bill Westenhofer, who is nominated for this year's Oscars, started with shots of actor Suraj Sharma alone on a lifeboat in a water tank against a blue screen. Working with 1,200 visual effects artists at several companies, he transformed this footage into the character of Pi Patel and a Bengal tiger on a vast, changeable sea. Rhythm & Hues, where Westenhofer works, conjured up most of the animals, seas and skies; other effects companies tackled everything from creating storm sequences and a sinking ship to making Sharma skinnier and Pondicherry, India, look like the 1970s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
On his second day in Los Angeles, Suraj Sharma was on a mission. "In-N-Out Burger is gonna happen whether or not anything else happens," said the lanky 19-year-old star of "Life of Pi," who was visiting the U.S. for the first time from his home in Delhi, India. In town in June for a few days of promoting the film and visiting college campuses, Sharma was determined to experience some of California's creature comforts - the miraculous weather and a double-double, animal style.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Fred Schruers
By all accounts, director Ang Lee is the soul of civility on a film set, sure-footed but collaborative, meticulously focused but ready to smile - the patient but quietly demanding center of an adventurous array of films. Lee gives his actors directorial "notes" in muted tones, but precisely and often enough that his longtime editor, Tim Squyres, privy to the tail ends of scenes from each day's footage, assures him that his actors will sometimes react when Lee turns away: "He'll see that when I tell an actor something, very often they'll roll their eyes behind me. " It's a characteristically humble confession (or exaggerated self-deprecation?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Ang Lee's "Life of Pi" asks that we take a leap of faith along with a boy named Pi Patel and a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker as an angry ocean and the ironies of fate set them adrift. Their struggle for survival is as elegant as it is epic with the director creating a grand adventure so cinematically bold, and a spiritual voyage so quietly profound, that if not for the risk to the castaways, you might wish their passage from India would never end. There are always moral crosscurrents in Lee's most provocative work, but so magical and mystical is this parable, it's as if the filmmaker has found the philosopher's stone.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Cristy Lytal
For director Ang Lee's "Life of Pi," the story of a spiritual Indian boy stranded at sea with a tiger, Oscar-winning visual effects supervisor Bill Westenhofer, who is nominated for this year's Oscars, started with shots of actor Suraj Sharma alone on a lifeboat in a water tank against a blue screen. Working with 1,200 visual effects artists at several companies, he transformed this footage into the character of Pi Patel and a Bengal tiger on a vast, changeable sea. Rhythm & Hues, where Westenhofer works, conjured up most of the animals, seas and skies; other effects companies tackled everything from creating storm sequences and a sinking ship to making Sharma skinnier and Pondicherry, India, look like the 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2012 | By John Horn
Director Ang Lee's 3-D adaptation of the novel "Life of Pi" is to launch the New York Film Festival on Sept. 28, marking the first time that a stereoscopic production has kicked off the prestigious festival. Due in theaters Nov. 21, Lee's reworking of novelist Yann Martel's bestselling account of a young man's (Suraj Sharma) travels on a lifeboat with a Bengal tiger marks the filmmaker's second opening-night appearance in New York. His "Ice Storm" started the festival in 1997, and his "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" was the closing-night film in 2000.
NEWS
July 25, 2012
Yann Martel's bestselling novel "Life of Pi" is coming to movie theaters this winter in 3-D. The trailer is online now. A delightully inventive story about Pi Patel, a 16-year-old whose life is much changed by a shipwreck, "Life of Pi" might have been considered unfilmable. Pi survives in a lifeboat along with a ferocious tiger, an orangutan, a zebra and a hyena. Drifting for months, he sees terrible and wondrous things. The project stopped and started with three directors - M. Night Shyamalan, Alfonso Cuaron and Jean-Pierre Jeunet - before getting traction with Ang Lee . He's done both CGI ("The Hulk")
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan
Hollywood usually reserves 3-D for very specific, box-office-friendly genres -- superhero films like "The Avengers," fantasies like the Harry Potter franchise and animated movies like "Toy Story 3. " But in "Life of Pi," which screens Friday as one of AFI Fest's centerpiece galas, director Ang Lee charted some new depths thematically with the format -- he used 3-D to shoot an adaptation of a soulful novel about a boy stranded at sea with a Bengal...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2012 | By John Horn
Actors routinely end up on the cutting room floor, particularly lesser-known names in small parts. But the performer excised at the last minute from director Ang Lee's upcoming release "Life of Pi" was neither obscure nor played a minor character: It was Tobey Maguire, who co-starred as an author in a crucial role that opens and closes the movie. The problem? Maguire was simply too famous for the role, meaning test audiences were overly focused on the actor himself, rather than his character.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman
The Tooth Fairy and her friends will be no match for a couple of sharp-fanged vampires at the box office this Thanksgiving. After debuting with a massive $141.1 million last weekend, "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn -- Part 2" is expected to rule the multiplex again over the holiday. The fifth and final installment in the vampire franchise will likely rake in another $50 million by Sunday, according to those who have seen pre-release audience surveys. That's far more than what "Rise of the Guardians"  -- an animated picture featuring classic children's characters like Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny -- is projected to collect between Wednesday and Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Ang Lee's "Life of Pi" asks that we take a leap of faith along with a boy named Pi Patel and a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker as an angry ocean and the ironies of fate set them adrift. Their struggle for survival is as elegant as it is epic with the director creating a grand adventure so cinematically bold, and a spiritual voyage so quietly profound, that if not for the risk to the castaways, you might wish their passage from India would never end. There are always moral crosscurrents in Lee's most provocative work, but so magical and mystical is this parable, it's as if the filmmaker has found the philosopher's stone.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
On his second day in Los Angeles, Suraj Sharma was on a mission. "In-N-Out Burger is gonna happen whether or not anything else happens," said the lanky 19-year-old star of "Life of Pi," who was visiting the U.S. for the first time from his home in Delhi, India. In town in June for a few days of promoting the film and visiting college campuses, Sharma was determined to experience some of California's creature comforts - the miraculous weather and a double-double, animal style.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
When Ang Lee first read Yann Martel's "Life of Pi" soon after its 2001 publication, the "Brokeback Mountain" filmmaker came to the same conclusion as any number of reasonable people in Hollywood would: There's no way this novel can be made into a movie. Lee's concern was tied less to staging the bestseller's central conceit - how could you stick a human actor and a tiger on a lifeboat without the loss of life? - than whether show business economics would transform the book's metaphysical narrative into something less than thought-provoking.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2012 | By John Horn
Actors routinely end up on the cutting room floor, particularly lesser-known names in small parts. But the performer excised at the last minute from director Ang Lee's upcoming release "Life of Pi" was neither obscure nor played a minor character: It was Tobey Maguire, who co-starred as an author in a crucial role that opens and closes the movie. The problem? Maguire was simply too famous for the role, meaning test audiences were overly focused on the actor himself, rather than his character.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan
Hollywood usually reserves 3-D for very specific, box-office-friendly genres -- superhero films like "The Avengers," fantasies like the Harry Potter franchise and animated movies like "Toy Story 3. " But in "Life of Pi," which screens Friday as one of AFI Fest's centerpiece galas, director Ang Lee charted some new depths thematically with the format -- he used 3-D to shoot an adaptation of a soulful novel about a boy stranded at sea with a Bengal...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- With a career that has encompassed everything from period British romance to Chinese martial arts, Ang Lee has taken on some wildly different challenges. But even he acknowledges that he bit off a lot when he decided to film "Life of Pi," an adaptation of Yann Martel's bestseller that is set primarily on a small boat containing just a boy and a Bengali tiger. "There's some good advice in the film business: Never make a movie about kids, animals or water ... and you'll see them all here," Lee told an audience Friday night at the opening of the New York Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
When Ang Lee first read Yann Martel's "Life of Pi" soon after its 2001 publication, the "Brokeback Mountain" filmmaker came to the same conclusion as any number of reasonable people in Hollywood would: There's no way this novel can be made into a movie. Lee's concern was tied less to staging the bestseller's central conceit - how could you stick a human actor and a tiger on a lifeboat without the loss of life? - than whether show business economics would transform the book's metaphysical narrative into something less than thought-provoking.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- With a career that has encompassed everything from period British romance to Chinese martial arts, Ang Lee has taken on some wildly different challenges. But even he acknowledges that he bit off a lot when he decided to film "Life of Pi," an adaptation of Yann Martel's bestseller that is set primarily on a small boat containing just a boy and a Bengali tiger. "There's some good advice in the film business: Never make a movie about kids, animals or water ... and you'll see them all here," Lee told an audience Friday night at the opening of the New York Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Ang Lee's CGI-saddled "Life of Pi" premieres tonight at the New York Film Festival, and, as you might expect from a 3-D adaptation of a novel full of allegory and computer-generated critters, the early reviews are all over the map. Hollywood Reporter film critic Todd McCarthy, a longtime booster of "Pi" director Lee, called the film a "gorgeous and accomplished rendering of the massive best-seller. " Lee's "fingerprints are at once invisible and yet all over the film," McCarthy added, "in the tact, intelligence, curiosity and confidence that characterizes the undertaking.
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