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BUSINESS
April 15, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Henry Mead Kaiser, a former Kaiser Permanente board member and grandson of the industrialist Henry J. Kaiser, pleaded guilty for his role in diverting $2 million from telecommunications company SureWest Communications to his venture capital firm. Kaiser, 59, pleaded guilty Tuesday to interstate transport of money obtained by fraud and conducting a transaction with stolen money, the U.S. attorney in Sacramento said.
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BUSINESS
April 15, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Henry Mead Kaiser, a former Kaiser Permanente board member and grandson of the industrialist Henry J. Kaiser, pleaded guilty for his role in diverting $2 million from telecommunications company SureWest Communications to his venture capital firm. Kaiser, 59, pleaded guilty Tuesday to interstate transport of money obtained by fraud and conducting a transaction with stolen money, the U.S. attorney in Sacramento said.
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BUSINESS
April 2, 2008 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
California's four biggest telephone companies Tuesday couldn't convince a key legislative committee that they should be allowed to charge consumers for unlisted numbers. Members of the state Senate Energy, Utilities and Communications Committee cast a bipartisan 5-0 vote for a bill by Sen. Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica) that would prohibit traditional, wired phone systems from collecting fees to keep numbers out of phone books and directory assistance.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
For the second time in two years, the powerful telecommunications industry has blocked a consumer-oriented bill that would have barred companies from charging land-line customers for unlisted numbers. On Tuesday, state Sen. Fran Pavley (D-Agoura Hills) put on hold for this year a bill that would have eliminated monthly unlisted-number fees.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2008 | DAVID LAZARUS
On Sept. 1, AT&T Inc. will cut the number of free 411 calls offered to customers each month to one from three. At first glance, that seems like a fairly small thing. But it reflects a bigger trend -- a systematic stripping away of phone services that once were provided free or for a nominal charge, and a steady increasing of fees for other services. A couple of years ago, state regulators granted phone companies the freedom to price services pretty much as they pleased.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2006 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
A simmering battle between the cable TV industry and major phone companies is about to boil over. Cable operators plan to start running ads today that accuse AT&T Inc., Verizon Communications Inc. and other major phone carriers of lying to the public and elected officials as the companies use their networks to roll out new television services.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2006 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Ending decades of government price regulation, the Public Utilities Commission on Thursday approved a plan that would allow California's major phone carriers to raise rates at will. The unanimous decision to abolish most price caps came after the commission concluded that competition from cable carriers and wireless providers had grown strong enough to check rate hikes by traditional land-line phone companies such as AT&T Inc.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2008 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
In California, where celebrities, billionaires and the rest of us prize a little privacy at home, the price of going unlisted is going up, big-time. Though cellphone companies charge nothing for unlisted phone numbers, consumers with traditional telephones connected by wires are often paying nearly $25 a year to stay out of the phone book and directory assistance. That adds up when you consider all the other add-on charges on phone bills.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2002 | JAMES S. GRANELLI and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two federal agencies took the unusual step of jumping into WorldCom Inc.'s bankruptcy case Monday to ensure continued telephone service, monitor developments and uncover possible mismanagement, irregularities or fraud at the nation's second-largest long-distance company.
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