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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Hobie Alter, who shaped Southern California's signature surf culture by pioneering the mass-produced foam surfboard and later popularized sailing by inventing a lightweight, high-performance catamaran, died Saturday at his home in Palm Desert. He was 80. The announcement of Alter's death was posted on www.hobie.com , his company's website. No cause was disclosed. Full obituary: Hobie Alter dies at 80 A self-taught design innovator and entrepreneur whose “Hobie” brand earned him a fortune, Alter was nonetheless a reluctant businessman who eschewed suits for cutoffs and was guided by his imagination above all else.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | From a Times staff writer
Hobie Alter, who died Saturday at the age of 80, was known as the Henry Ford of surfing. In 1958, he developed the mass-produced foam surfboard with a partner. He later popularized sailing by inventing a lightweight, high-performance catamaran. The impact of his innovation was big; it allowed people who couldn't lift heavy wood boards to surf, and it opened sailing up to those who could never afford yacht club dues.  OBITUARY: Hobie Alter shaped Southern California surf culture Alter once said he never wanted to work east of Pacific Coast Highway, and he got his wish.
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BUSINESS
July 22, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, Patrice Apodaca covers economic issues for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-5979 and at patrice.apodaca@latimes.com
Denise Denison-Erkeneff, president of the Orange County Ad Club, and her husband, Rick, want to get the message out that surfing represents serious business and is a major contributor to the economy. The pair, who run their own ad agency, R&D Graphics and Marketing in Dana Point, are organizing an Ad Club event Thursday night called Tapping the Source, in which they'll discuss the ways surf imagery is used to sell products, both inside and outside the surf world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Hobie Alter, who shaped Southern California's signature surf culture by pioneering the mass-produced foam surfboard and later popularized sailing by inventing a lightweight, high-performance catamaran, died Saturday at his home in Palm Desert. He was 80. The announcement of Alter's death was posted on www.hobie.com , his company's website. No cause was disclosed. Full obituary: Hobie Alter dies at 80 A self-taught design innovator and entrepreneur whose “Hobie” brand earned him a fortune, Alter was nonetheless a reluctant businessman who eschewed suits for cutoffs and was guided by his imagination above all else.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
The endless summer is over in Orange Country -- that is, the Laguna Art Museum's big surfing show is done -- but a similar swell is rolling toward the usually landlocked Autry Museum of Western Heritage in Los Angeles. The Laguna museum show, "Surf Culture: The Art History of Surfing," ran from late July through Oct. 6 amid blockbuster treatment, from extended museum hours to boosted prices. One critic called the show "profoundly confused and poorly presented."
NEWS
July 27, 1990
Surfing has emblazoned American culture with many images and symbols over the past 30 years. It has inspired movies from "Endless Summer" to "Beach Blanket Bingo", influenced rock 'n' roll, and to this day set trends in fashion from coast to coast. WHEELS Immortalized by the hit song "Surf City," wood-paneled station wagons like this 1940 Ford were the sterotypical mode of transportation for surfers in the 1950s and 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2008 | Don Patterson
The question is less about what the five panelists of "Surf Culture: Shooting the Tube" are going to talk about Sunday and more about what they'll have time to talk about. Like a lot of offerings at this weekend's sprawling Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, this panel is more of a sampler platter of food for thought than a full-course meal. In its raw form, surfing can be defined in three simple parts: a wave, a board, a person. But the fictional and nonfictional writings of this session's experts -- Antoine Wilson, Steve Hawk, Steven Kotler, Kem Nunn and David Rensin -- reflect life's struggles, rebellion, the inner workings of the human spirit -- and how do you wedge all that into an hour?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
Every year around this time, in between their usual encounters with truth, beauty, scholarship and donor-cultivation, the museum directors of North America can be seen facing another humbling challenge: How can their indoor spaces compete with the great outdoors on a sunny summer day? The answer this year, if you're the Laguna Art Museum, is to paddle with the prevailing tide. That is, to mount a show on the cultural implications of surfing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
In 1956, Terry "Tubesteak" Tracy, freshly fired from his job at a downtown insurance company, bid goodbye to the 9-to-5 life and headed for the Malibu shore, where he built himself a shack out of wood scraps and palm fronds and sailed into surfing history. He was, according to surfing historian Matt Warshaw, a decent surfer, but his ticket to glory wasn't what he did on a board: It was the aesthetic he embraced. Tracy, better known by the nickname "Tubesteak," was the personification of the rebellious surf subculture that emerged in California in the late 1950s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
In 1956, Terry "Tubesteak" Tracy, freshly fired from his job at a downtown insurance company, bid goodbye to the 9-to-5 life and headed for the Malibu shore, where he built himself a shack out of wood scraps and palm fronds and sailed into surfing history. He was, according to surfing historian Matt Warshaw, a decent surfer, but his ticket to glory wasn't what he did on a board: It was the aesthetic he embraced. Tracy, better known by the nickname "Tubesteak," was the personification of the rebellious surf subculture that emerged in California in the late 1950s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
LeRoy Grannis, a noted photographer whose widely printed images captured and popularized the surf culture of California as it exploded in the 1960s and '70s, has died. He was 93. Grannis, who also co-founded what is now Surfing magazine, died Thursday of natural causes at a Torrance nursing facility, said his son John. "There's surfing royalty, and he was one of the kings," his son said. "He inspired so many big-name photographers that consider him their mentor. " FOR THE RECORD: LeRoy Grannis: In the Feb. 5 LATExtra section, the obituary of photographer LeRoy Grannis, whose images popularized the surf culture, included a photo with a caption that said he co-founded what is now Surfer magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2008 | Don Patterson
The question is less about what the five panelists of "Surf Culture: Shooting the Tube" are going to talk about Sunday and more about what they'll have time to talk about. Like a lot of offerings at this weekend's sprawling Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, this panel is more of a sampler platter of food for thought than a full-course meal. In its raw form, surfing can be defined in three simple parts: a wave, a board, a person. But the fictional and nonfictional writings of this session's experts -- Antoine Wilson, Steve Hawk, Steven Kotler, Kem Nunn and David Rensin -- reflect life's struggles, rebellion, the inner workings of the human spirit -- and how do you wedge all that into an hour?
HOME & GARDEN
August 2, 2007 | Jake Townsend, Special to The Times
AFTER spending almost 20 years as head of visual merchandising and store design for Quiksilver, Steve Jones can say without much exaggeration that the surf is his life. The Laguna Beach apartment where he lives during the week is classic coastal modern, a bright white cube with punches of sunny color. A wall of plate glass bathes the home in summer sunlight to a concert of rustling sea breezes and crashing waves.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
David Milch is the last guy I'd figure to bring back "Touched by an Angel," but I was well into Episode 2 of his new HBO series "John From Cincinnati" and running out of options. What is this? The network is introducing the show Sunday night, after the finale of "The Sopranos." To start a series featuring a frothing, discursive, junkie surfer five seconds after the most important series in HBO's history ends is an understandable programming decision but also a kind of madness.
BOOKS
June 11, 2006 | Antoine Wilson, Antoine Wilson is the author of the forthcoming novel "The Interloper" from Handsel Books/Other Press. He lives and surfs in L.A.
RIDING a wave is an elusive experience, and writing about the feeling for nonsurfers is, to borrow a phrase, like dancing about architecture. Trying to convey it to fellow surfers might be even worse, like yammering on about the dream you had last night. The problem is that the essence of surfing is also its blind spot. The wave just caught instantly becomes the proverbial "one that got away." Surfers spend most of their time looking for waves, not riding them.
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came in Mercedes-Benzes, big Suburbans and cherried-out vans with surfboard racks. Definitely a SoCal crowd. Just ask the dude valet-parking the cars at the Chart House, an upscale restaurant overlooking Dana Point Harbor where they were congregating this evening. The attraction wasn't the food, the booze or the harbor view. It was a 53-year-old former Californian whose name, Drew Kampion, would hardly raise eyebrows or draw much attention from those outside surfing's mainstream.
NEWS
June 7, 2005 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
It is the cusp of another summer, a bright morning with just enough breeze to carry the overripe scent of ocean, like food left on the table too long. The waves run small, which doesn't stop two dozen surfers from sharking around the lineup, dropping in on each other, riding shoulder to shoulder. Mysto George stands by the wall at Surfrider Beach in Malibu and shrugs: "Kinda crowded." This spot was always a zoo.
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