Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSurface Streets
IN THE NEWS

Surface Streets

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
July 10, 2011 | By Rob Long
About the first thing I heard 20 years ago, when I moved to Los Angeles, was this: "Take surface streets. " "Surface streets" is a uniquely L.A. phrase meaning, roughly, take Beverly Glen. It can mean other streets, depending on what side of town you live on, but the underlying philosophy is clear: Do not take the freeway. The freeway will swallow you up. The freeway will take your day and twist it, irrationally, into a stressed-out ordeal in which you're always running 20 minutes late.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 28, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
The smiles should be wide and plentiful. The Dodgers' new owners should take over this week, meeting the media and greeting fans and officially liberating the team from its dysfunctional era. What could possibly wipe the smiles off the faces of Magic Johnson, Stan Kasten and Mark Walter? How about the Angels moving into a new ballpark in downtown Los Angeles, three miles from Dodger Stadium? As the Dodgers emerge from bankruptcy, the most compelling baseball story in town might well involve how the Dodgers and Angels handle their aging ballparks.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | MARK GLADSTONE, Times Staff Writer
With traffic gridlock part of the daily commute on the Westside, Gov. George Deukmejian has proposed spending $4.5 million to launch a high-tech system to relieve congestion along the Santa Monica Freeway corridor. In his proposed state budget released last week, Deukmejian said that the so-called Smart Corridor Demonstration Project would feature ramp meters, message signs and monitored coordination of traffic signals along parallel routes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2011 | By Sam Quinones, Angel Jennings and Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
With patience, frustration and a lot of help from their GPS devices, L.A. commuters faced down a true "carmageddon" as a spectacular tanker truck explosion kept a key freeway closed and turned the already tough Christmastime traffic into an endurance contest. Commutes between eastern suburbs and Los Angeles that once took half an hour doubled and tripled as other freeways and surface streets clogged for miles. When the 60 Freeway - which normally carries about 225,000 cars daily - closed Wednesday afternoon, it took Patty Ortega three hours to get home to North Whittier after she made the fateful choice to take Beverly Boulevard and Olympic Boulevard.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As commuters have digested the fact that they have no choice but to come down from the trestles that for decades have carried them over the urban grid, many for the first time will glimpse an unfamiliar L.A. During the past two weeks, people waiting for elevators, over dinner tables or in line at the supermarket have begun to trade routes and guarded shortcuts. They compare them like top-of-the-line consumer items, speculating over which will provide the best performance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1994 | SCOTT HADLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Debbie Rodgers-Teasley does not need a traffic study to tell her that the number of cars and trucks running through Moorpark has surged in the last year. She just has to look out her office window. "It's constant," said Rodgers-Teasley, a real estate agent and president of the Moorpark Chamber of Commerce. "On any given day at any given time, you'll find a line of trucks heading down (California) 118 through Moorpark. If you don't see them, you feel them roaring by."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1994 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Sam Hall Kaplan is a critic and urban designer whose books include "L.A. Lost & Found" (Crown) and "L.A. Follies" (Cityscape).
As if Los Angeles did not have enough problems, now it has a crippled freeway system to add to the region's growing fragmentation. Particularly hard hit in Monday's earthquake was the nation's busiest freeway, the Santa Monica. Now it seems the provincial comment of privileged Westsiders--that they try never to go east of La Cienega--will be tested with the collapse of the freeway at, of all places, the La Cienega overpass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000
All the letters I've seen so far regarding the hazards of using a cell phone while driving have referred to driving regular cars. How would you like to be cruising down the freeway on an express MTA bus while the driver is yakking away with a member of his/her family? That's what I experienced a few weeks ago on the 550 line when the driver was engaged in a spirited call for at least 10 minutes. It started while we were on the Harbor Freeway and continued until we were well onto surface streets.
NEWS
August 31, 1989
What kind of historical-sensitive community is South Pasadena that it cannot see the need for the final linkup of the Long Beach Freeway? They'll only get to their historical houses faster, they won't have to travel on their cracked and potholed surface streets, they won't have to be the object of scorn from the neighboring communities for stunting (beneficial) progress, and they will surely help us avoid the increased millions of tax dollars in added delays. Yes! For a historical-sensitive community that is so big on itself, they have such a tiny museum to display it. RICHARD J. CERVANTES Alhambra
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1990
I wholeheartedly support the idea of a toll road in San Diego County ("San Diego Toll Road Plan Among 4 OKd by State," Sept. 15). As usual, opposition comes mainly from the politicians, who stand to lose votes from not being able to "give" their constituents another "free"way. They claim that motorists, given a choice between paying to use a toll road or traveling "free" on surface streets, would choose to clog up the surface streets. They are wrong in this assumption, as free-market economics continues to prove (i.e.
OPINION
July 10, 2011 | By Rob Long
About the first thing I heard 20 years ago, when I moved to Los Angeles, was this: "Take surface streets. " "Surface streets" is a uniquely L.A. phrase meaning, roughly, take Beverly Glen. It can mean other streets, depending on what side of town you live on, but the underlying philosophy is clear: Do not take the freeway. The freeway will swallow you up. The freeway will take your day and twist it, irrationally, into a stressed-out ordeal in which you're always running 20 minutes late.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2009 | Tami Abdollah
Orange County's plan to widen a traffic-clogged stretch of the 405 Freeway is facing unexpected opposition from some residents along the route and has generated new debate over the divergent transportation priorities of L.A. and Orange counties. The plan targets one of the region's biggest traffic trouble spots, where 300,000 cars travel each day between Irvine and the L.A. County border. Without the improvement, Orange County transportation officials said maximum commute times during peak hours will continue to increase.
NEWS
December 27, 2007 | Denise Fondo, Denise Fondo is the afternoon-drive traffic reporter for KNX-AM (1070).
Change is at the root of the word "commute." Thinking ahead and being ready to change will help us live up to our role as commuters. If you know you have to exit the freeway, don't stay in the left lane until the last second. This causes accidents. Lookey-loos add thousands of commuter hours to our roadways yearly. Stop gawking at accidents. Ditch the car one day a week for Metrolink, carpools, buses, subways, bicycles or walking. Finally, prepare for your commute as you would for an evacuation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2006 | Jean Merl, Times Staff Writer
A planning session Saturday with residents and merchants near Los Angeles International Airport underscored many of the challenges officials face as they try to modernize the 77-year-old facility. The purpose was to gauge community reaction to eight ideas for easing traffic congestion, such as double-decking Century Boulevard, providing direct access from the 405 and 105 freeways and adding two tunnels under the south runways to accommodate Sepulveda Boulevard traffic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2006 | Dana Parsons, Dana Parsons ' column appears Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. He can be reached at (714) 966-7821 or at dana.parsons@latimes.com. An archive of his recent columns is at www.latimes.com/parsons.
Notes from the 405: Were you one of the lucky ones -- traveling the San Diego Freeway on Thursday afternoon, heading into or out of Orange County and just being grateful to live in the splendor of Southern California? Me too. Then, of course, came our discovery on that fateful afternoon: A big rig had gone crazy on the freeway in Long Beach, resulting in lane closures in both directions. As best I can recall, here's how my trek from Costa Mesa to Long Beach went. 5:45 p.m.
OPINION
June 13, 2005
Re "Driver Shot on Century Freeway," June 10: Today I'm depressed. Driving to work on the 105, I passed the Crenshaw Boulevard offramp and was reminded of the latest freeway shooting. The 105, 110 and 405 are freeways that my friends and co-workers traverse daily to and from work, roads that my parents and children use to get to schools, shopping malls and movie theaters. Today our freeways are unsafe because a few individuals have decided they can shoot at people driving in cars next to them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1986
Pursued by a Los Angeles police helicopter, a motorcyclist hit a car and crashed in the east San Fernando Valley Sunday after racing at speeds up to 110 m.p.h. on a freeway and surface streets, authorities said. A police officer in a squad car spotted Jesus Cardenas, 23, running red lights on his motorcycle in the city's Lincoln Heights section and pursued Cardenas on the Golden State Freeway through Glendale and Burbank, said Los Angeles police Sgt. John Amott.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2001
Re "Glendale Blvd. Traffic Fix Back in Slow Lane," July 12: All of the solutions offered will do little to really solve the traffic problems on Glendale Boulevard. There is a de facto freeway running through Echo Park because the freeway proposed was never built. Although extending the freeway all the way to Beverly Hills is impractical, why not extend it just down to the Hollywood Freeway between Rampart and Alvarado? Blocking construction of a freeway just because you don't want it in your neighborhood doesn't stop the traffic.
OPINION
March 1, 2005
Re "A Signal Achievement in Fullerton and Pasadena," Feb. 25: Having a flashing yellow left-lane turn arrow is definitely a step in the right direction for relieving gridlock. However, the biggest problem facing all of L.A. is a lack of synchronized lights, which are nearly impossible to achieve with newer lights featuring left-lane turn arrows. These modern light cycles have four cycles instead of only two, essentially doubling to quadrupling the wait times. At a time when L.A. freeways are clogged, I find it sadly ironic that these newer left-lane turn signals have now clogged all of our surface streets with cars waiting endlessly for their turn to go. The result is gridlock citywide.
NEWS
March 4, 2004 | Pete Metzger, Times Staff Writer
You're driving down the Santa Monica Freeway, heading east into downtown. In your rear-view mirror, the late-afternoon sun is setting. Your foot firmly down on the accelerator, you speed past the exit signs for Vermont Avenue. Only two other cars dot the lanes ahead of you. Smooth sailing. A commuter dream? Not exactly. You're playing True Crime Streets of L.A., a new game that's taken on the daunting task of trying to accurately re-create 240 square miles of our sprawling burg.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|