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BUSINESS
August 13, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Surface Transportation Board gave final written approval to the $5.4-billion merger of Union Pacific and Southern Pacific.
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BUSINESS
June 11, 2001 | Reuters
Federal regulators today are expected to issue new rules governing railroad mergers that industry experts say will make it more difficult for North America's remaining major rail carriers to merge, but will likely prompt more marketing alliances. The Surface Transportation Board rules are expected to follow closely a draft proposal that would hold future mergers to better guarantees of uninterrupted service and new requirements to enhance competition.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1997
The concern expressed here a year ago over the $5.4-billion merger of Union Pacific and Southern Pacific railroads lay in the details. Now, it turns out, had those details been given closer consideration the current delays in moving freight on what has become the nation's largest railroad might have been avoided, at least in part. Union Pacific provides the rail hub for the movement of goods in and out of the nation's busiest ports, Los Angeles and Long Beach.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | Washington Post
The Surface Transportation Board, seeking to end severe rail service problems in Texas and the Gulf Coast, said it will consider whether to order sale of parts of the newly merged Union Pacific and Southern Pacific railroads to competitors. If the board eventually concludes that major sales are needed, it will mark one of the rare instances in which federal regulators have ordered even a partial breakup of a rail merger.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2001 | Reuters
Federal regulators today are expected to issue new rules governing railroad mergers that industry experts say will make it more difficult for North America's remaining major rail carriers to merge, but will likely prompt more marketing alliances. The Surface Transportation Board rules are expected to follow closely a draft proposal that would hold future mergers to better guarantees of uninterrupted service and new requirements to enhance competition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1996
Did Congress and the Clinton administration go too far in gutting the old Interstate Commerce Commission? The question arises in the matter of the $5.4-billion merger of Union Pacific and Southern Pacific, which would create the nation's largest railroad. The prospect for California is mixed. The new railroad would cut 1,940 jobs here, but Union Pacific would invest $350 million in upgrading Southern Pacific facilities.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | Washington Post
The Surface Transportation Board, seeking to end severe rail service problems in Texas and the Gulf Coast, said it will consider whether to order sale of parts of the newly merged Union Pacific and Southern Pacific railroads to competitors. If the board eventually concludes that major sales are needed, it will mark one of the rare instances in which federal regulators have ordered even a partial breakup of a rail merger.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators Friday issued an emergency order requiring troubled Union Pacific Railroad to open a section of track to a Texas competitor in a bid to ease the gridlock that has harmed shippers across the Western United States. The Surface Transportation Board, which just days ago held a marathon hearing on the problems at the nation's largest railroad, said Friday that there is a "transportation emergency in the West."
NEWS
February 9, 1996 | GEBE MARTINEZ
Even before taking his oath of office as a presidential appointee in 1994, California businessman Gus Owen knew his days were numbered. Or so he thought. After all, the Orange County Republican businessman was being named to the Interstate Commerce Commission, just as Congress was preparing to shut it down. Sixteen months later, the commission is gone, but Owen is still in town.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Federal regulators banned excessive fuel surcharges by railroads and imposed strict rules on the fees that many companies this week credited with bolstering their quarterly earnings, although the savings were unlikely to trickle down to consumers. In its decision, the Surface Transportation Board said the railroads must link the surcharges directly with the actual fuel costs for specific rail shipments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1997
The concern expressed here a year ago over the $5.4-billion merger of Union Pacific and Southern Pacific railroads lay in the details. Now, it turns out, had those details been given closer consideration the current delays in moving freight on what has become the nation's largest railroad might have been avoided, at least in part. Union Pacific provides the rail hub for the movement of goods in and out of the nation's busiest ports, Los Angeles and Long Beach.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
Federal regulators Friday issued an emergency order requiring troubled Union Pacific Railroad to open a section of track to a Texas competitor in a bid to ease the gridlock that has harmed shippers across the Western United States. The Surface Transportation Board, which just days ago held a marathon hearing on the problems at the nation's largest railroad, said Friday that there is a "transportation emergency in the West."
BUSINESS
August 13, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Surface Transportation Board gave final written approval to the $5.4-billion merger of Union Pacific and Southern Pacific.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1996
Did Congress and the Clinton administration go too far in gutting the old Interstate Commerce Commission? The question arises in the matter of the $5.4-billion merger of Union Pacific and Southern Pacific, which would create the nation's largest railroad. The prospect for California is mixed. The new railroad would cut 1,940 jobs here, but Union Pacific would invest $350 million in upgrading Southern Pacific facilities.
NEWS
February 9, 1996 | GEBE MARTINEZ
Even before taking his oath of office as a presidential appointee in 1994, California businessman Gus Owen knew his days were numbered. Or so he thought. After all, the Orange County Republican businessman was being named to the Interstate Commerce Commission, just as Congress was preparing to shut it down. Sixteen months later, the commission is gone, but Owen is still in town.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Conrail May Oppose Rail Merger: The Philadelphia-based company said it plans to file comments opposing the proposed $5.4-billion acquisition of Southern Pacific Rail Corp. by Union Pacific Corp. unless certain lines in the Gulf of Mexico and Eastern regions operated by Southern Pacific are sold. Conrail Inc. said it will file comments with the Surface Transportation Board saying that Union Pacific's proposed trackage rights agreement with Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp.
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