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NEWS
November 22, 2000 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A woman I know once spent 10 minutes looking for a parking place in front of the YMCA even though there was ample parking a mere three blocks away. I, er, that is, she, can't be the only one trapped in such irony--most gyms have pretty big parking lots that are often full. And yet there is something fraudulent about driving to a place to get on a treadmill, something that awakens the inner grandma in us all--"You pay money to exercise? You can walk for free."
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NEWS
November 22, 2000 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A woman I know once spent 10 minutes looking for a parking place in front of the YMCA even though there was ample parking a mere three blocks away. I, er, that is, she, can't be the only one trapped in such irony--most gyms have pretty big parking lots that are often full. And yet there is something fraudulent about driving to a place to get on a treadmill, something that awakens the inner grandma in us all--"You pay money to exercise? You can walk for free."
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NEWS
March 9, 1999 | LARRY GORDON and TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rage and frustration among long-distance commuters in the Riverside-San Bernardino area turn into roadway death at a higher rate than in any other major metropolitan region in the nation, according to a new study of dangerously aggressive driving.
NEWS
March 9, 1999 | LARRY GORDON and TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rage and frustration among long-distance commuters in the Riverside-San Bernardino area turn into roadway death at a higher rate than in any other major metropolitan region in the nation, according to a new study of dangerously aggressive driving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1999 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura County streets are safer for pedestrians than they were a few years ago, but they are still meaner than they should be, particularly for children, according to a report released Tuesday. There were 20 pedestrians killed and 560 injured on local roads in the last two years. In 1998, the county was the 17th most dangerous for pedestrians in the state, an improvement over 1997, when it ranked 14th. But of the victims, a disproportionately large number have been children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2004 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
Shirley Goldstein remembers wistfully the days when she still had a car. Since the 81-year-old Sherman Oaks resident stopped driving six years ago, she doesn't see her friends as much. She now spends most of her evenings at home, instead of at the cinema or church bingo games. "My friends ... we're all in our late 70s and 80s. We don't drive. It's hard for us to get anywhere," Goldstein said. "Now, we're mostly stay-at-home folks."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1999
The County Board of Supervisors passed an emergency motion Tuesday requesting that a new task force on pedestrian safety immediately investigate several recent accidents that have left six dead in the region. On Oct. 8, a mother and two of her young sons were killed in Boyle Heights while walking to school. The next day, two hit-and-run drivers struck and killed a 4-year-old boy when he ran across a street in El Sereno.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1999 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alarmed by a study naming Los Angeles County as California's most dangerous place for pedestrians, especially children, the Board of Supervisors urged Gov. Gray Davis to sign legislation allocating $20 million for programs to make schools safer for children on foot. The money would come from federal allocations to states under a massive initiative backed by President Clinton to strengthen transportation safety programs.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you ever have bounced along the uneven pavement on the Long Beach Freeway or rumbled down the cracks of the Santa Ana Freeway, you know it can't be good for your car. A new study confirms the worst fears of many motorists in the Los Angeles area: Poor freeway conditions around Southern California are imposing costly damage.
NEWS
April 17, 2001 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Californians are riding public transit in record numbers, even in car-crazy Los Angeles, with 25 of the state's 29 largest transit systems showing a growth in ridership last year, statistics released Monday showed. Stressed-out long-distance commuters apparently fled to trains in large enough numbers to give rail lines in the Silicon Valley and the San Francisco Bay Area the state's highest percentage increases, according to data released by the American Public Transit Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1999 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California commuters who are stuck in long traffic delays caused by freeway construction are now faced with this sobering thought: They may never make up for the lost time.
AUTOS
February 6, 2002 | JEANNE WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The recent report of a 51% increase in the number of pedestrians killed on Los Angeles streets last year sends a chilling message. Despite scattered attempts to make California more pedestrian-friendly, the automobile remains king of the road here. Heaven help those on foot who think they can always rely on drivers to stop or even slow down, even at clearly marked crosswalks.
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