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TRAVEL
November 7, 2010 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times staff writer
If you plan to fly with your favorite board to catch gnarly surf, get ready for a wild ride - financially, that is. Many airlines charge $100 or more each way to take surfboards as checked baggage. A few charge nothing. So check it out before you check it in. And be glad you're not a professional surfer. "It's mind-blowing how expensive it is to travel with surfboards," said Hawaiian pro surfer Fred Patacchia Jr. "I just recently went to Europe on American Airlines and was charged $150 per board, traveling with nine boards.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | Mike Anton
When he was a young man, Hobie Alter had a clear vision of his future: He didn't want a job that would require hard-soled shoes, and he didn't want to work east of Pacific Coast Highway. He succeeded. The son of a second-generation orange grower, Alter is credited with innovations that allowed people who couldn't lift log slabs to surf and those who couldn't pay for yacht club memberships to sail. Share your memories: Hobie's contributions to SoCal culture Known practically everywhere with a coastline or a lake simply as "Hobie," Alter developed the mass-produced foam surfboard.
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HOME & GARDEN
June 29, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Wanted to warn that I'm not a particularly skilled surfer, but I think you would just assume that. Basically, I excel at nothing in particular, though I did win the father-son fantasy football league last season and am poised to repeat. I'm also a pretty good public speaker. Imagine a snarkier Winston Churchill. Remember that for your next company event. My fee is a mere $1 million, but for that I also clean up afterward and unburden you of all your leftover Leinenkugel. I also line a pretty good batter's box, though the umpire at last week's Pony League tournament kept smothering the back line with his shoe, believing it was a little too deep.
HEALTH
August 2, 2013 | Roy Wallack, Gear
Back when I was a kid going to the beach every weekend with my dad, I never thought of body surfing as a workout. It was just pure exhilaration - dog-paddling out there for hours, waiting for a good swell, then swimming like crazy for a couple of seconds to catch the wave and ride it at eyeball level, a human surfboard in a rush of sound and foam. Gear wasn't necessary, other than a fin or two. But when I rediscovered body surfing recently, I was surprised to find that gear for it had evolved and that it was a fantastic all-body workout - and just as much fun as ever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2008 | Richard Marosi
U.S. Border Patrol agents on Wednesday discovered 36 pounds of marijuana concealed inside a surfboard that washed up on a beach near the border. The blue board had been hollowed out and glued back together after being packed with marijuana, according to the Border Patrol. Agents found the surfboard while on routine patrol at Friendship Park, which abuts the border with Tijuana. The drugs had a street value of $29,360, authorities said. There were no arrests. -- Richard Marosi
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As one of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory "rocket boys," engineer Herman Bank had already helped launch the Space Age when wobbly surfboards strapped atop his station wagon in the early 1960s led him to another design frontier. After securing his cargo alongside a Los Angeles freeway, Bank puzzled over how to make the era's nearly 10-foot-long boards easier to transport. A son who surfed persuaded him that the answer was to slice them in two. By 1966, Bank had come up with a way to cut a surfboard in half so it could be taken apart for travel and bolted back together at the beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2012 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
Well into his 70s, Terry Martin could be found most days in his Dana Point workshop sanding blocks of polyurethane foam into precision-shaped surfboards. With his big white beard and barrel chest, Martin looked like Santa riding out a blizzard of swirling white dust. Over a nearly six-decade career, Martin is said to have shaped more surfboards than anyone - some 80,000 - although the exact number is unknowable. Martin himself once said he stopped counting after 50,000. Martin's output and perfectionism made him an icon among the tight-knit fraternity of surfing's best shapers, one of a dwindling number of craftsmen who earn a living making surfboards by hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2010 | By Mike Anton
Surfing's dirty secret is easy to find in the drab enclave of San Clemente known as the surf ghetto, where the ocean breeze is spiked with the sweet smell of chemicals and men wearing flip-flops and coated with white dust search for magic inside blocks of toxic foam. Joey Santley is looking for something equally elusive: an environmentally friendly surfboard. Or at least one with a carbon footprint that's less titanic. "A 'green surfboard' is inherently an oxymoron at this point," said Santley, 44, a frenetic surfboard shaper and entrepreneur.
IMAGE
May 20, 2012 | By Lisa Paul Streitfeld, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The pirate with the knife in his teeth perched in the palm tree beside the store isn't real. Neither is the armed buccaneer greeting visitors inside the front door. But the booty is. True to its name, Hidden Treasures is an amazing discovery for motorists passing through Topanga Canyon. Located at a crossroads where the '60s never ended, this vintage store has lured shoppers all the way from Japan and has been featured in publications ranging from Playboy to Vogue. Kate Moss has said she shops for vintage here.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | United Press International
A great white shark chomped into a surfboard and bit the hand of a surfer Saturday before he could ride a wave to shore, officials said. Craig Rogers, 41, was sitting on his surfboard waiting for a wave at 7:30 a.m. along Tunitas Beach when he felt a strange sensation. "He felt a tug at his surfboard, looked down and found himself looking eye to eye with a great white shark," Police Sgt. Lou Zirelli said. "The shark had three-fourths of the width of the surfboard in his mouth."
HOME & GARDEN
June 29, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Wanted to warn that I'm not a particularly skilled surfer, but I think you would just assume that. Basically, I excel at nothing in particular, though I did win the father-son fantasy football league last season and am poised to repeat. I'm also a pretty good public speaker. Imagine a snarkier Winston Churchill. Remember that for your next company event. My fee is a mere $1 million, but for that I also clean up afterward and unburden you of all your leftover Leinenkugel. I also line a pretty good batter's box, though the umpire at last week's Pony League tournament kept smothering the back line with his shoe, believing it was a little too deep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- The apparent shark bites found on the body of a surfer came from an attack after the 42-year-old man had drowned, the San Diego County medical examiner ruled late Friday. Brandon Beaver died while on a surfing outing off Pacific Beach. His body was discovered floating offshore early Thursday. Medical examiner investigators who responded to a call from San Diego lifeguards had reached a tentative conclusion that the bites came in a "post-mortem" attack. But a final ruling was delayed until a more detailed examination could take take place Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As one of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory "rocket boys," engineer Herman Bank had already helped launch the Space Age when wobbly surfboards strapped atop his station wagon in the early 1960s led him to another design frontier. After securing his cargo alongside a Los Angeles freeway, Bank puzzled over how to make the era's nearly 10-foot-long boards easier to transport. A son who surfed persuaded him that the answer was to slice them in two. By 1966, Bank had come up with a way to cut a surfboard in half so it could be taken apart for travel and bolted back together at the beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2012 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
Well into his 70s, Terry Martin could be found most days in his Dana Point workshop sanding blocks of polyurethane foam into precision-shaped surfboards. With his big white beard and barrel chest, Martin looked like Santa riding out a blizzard of swirling white dust. Over a nearly six-decade career, Martin is said to have shaped more surfboards than anyone - some 80,000 - although the exact number is unknowable. Martin himself once said he stopped counting after 50,000. Martin's output and perfectionism made him an icon among the tight-knit fraternity of surfing's best shapers, one of a dwindling number of craftsmen who earn a living making surfboards by hand.
IMAGE
May 20, 2012 | By Lisa Paul Streitfeld, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The pirate with the knife in his teeth perched in the palm tree beside the store isn't real. Neither is the armed buccaneer greeting visitors inside the front door. But the booty is. True to its name, Hidden Treasures is an amazing discovery for motorists passing through Topanga Canyon. Located at a crossroads where the '60s never ended, this vintage store has lured shoppers all the way from Japan and has been featured in publications ranging from Playboy to Vogue. Kate Moss has said she shops for vintage here.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2011 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Surfboard manufacturers have a number of concerns — heavy competition, expensive shipping and employees who occasionally like to slip out early when there's a good break. Product liability lawsuits typically aren't one of their worries. That's what makes a lawsuit that recreational surfer Tom Gregg filed against Channel Islands Surfboards a little unusual. Gregg contends that a fin on his Channel Islands board cut a deep gash on his right leg when he wiped out off the coast of France in 2009.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1993
Your article (July 22) on proposed cuts in county lifeguard coverage did not articulate a major beach issue. The reality of seeing the dagger-like point of a surfboard bearing down upon you as you stand in the waves gives you a broad definition of "public safety." A close second, as a risk to life, to any riptide is the inconsiderate surfer. Eliminating lifeguards will effectively close the ocean to bathers. The photo with the story, showing a lifeguard warning surfers from a swimming area, does raise the issue, and perhaps suggests a solution.
TRAVEL
October 27, 1996
Finally I see an article regarding the infamous cost of the surfboard to Hawaii! ("Surfers, Cyclists Pay Penalty," Sept. 29) We travel to Kauai, Hawaii, at least once a year. The airline people at United always charge $50 for a surfboard under 10 feet in length. The sister airlines, like Aloha, vary depending on the mood of the check-in people. They have different rates! If a board is traveling inter-island and also traveling to California, it can cost at least $50 to Honolulu and another $50 between islands.
TRAVEL
November 7, 2010 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times staff writer
If you plan to fly with your favorite board to catch gnarly surf, get ready for a wild ride - financially, that is. Many airlines charge $100 or more each way to take surfboards as checked baggage. A few charge nothing. So check it out before you check it in. And be glad you're not a professional surfer. "It's mind-blowing how expensive it is to travel with surfboards," said Hawaiian pro surfer Fred Patacchia Jr. "I just recently went to Europe on American Airlines and was charged $150 per board, traveling with nine boards.
NEWS
October 14, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Broken surfboards? Oversized sofas in the lobby? Outdoor movie theater? Relax (and really, that’s the point). These cool design elements and amenities come together at Waikiki Edition , the first boutique hotel in a new Marriott brand that’s scheduled for an official opening Friday in Honolulu . The hotel, a few minutes from the beach, actually has been open to guests for the last few weeks. It occupies a tower of the Ilikai building, one of the city's landmarks that some TV viewers may remember from the opening sequence of the original "Hawaii Five-0" series.
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