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August 24, 2010
POP MUSIC Norah Jones In support of her fourth album, "The Fall," Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Norah Jones presents an evening of rootsy torch songs. British singer-songwriter Corinne Bailey Rae, who in the past few years has become almost as much of a concert draw as Jones, will be opening. Santa Barbara Bowl , 1122 N. Milpas St., Santa Barbara. 7 p.m. $48.50-$73.50. (805) 962-7411. www.sbbowl.org . EVENTS The Art of Surfboard Shaping For the dedicated, surfing is more than a sport — it's a spiritual pursuit, and that means surfboard shapers like Scott Anderson are akin to shamans.
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NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
If you love to spend your beach time on top of the water rather than in it, you can thank Hobie for helping you do it. Hobie Alter, the “Henry Ford of surfing,” who revolutionized surfing and put his name on whole lines of surfboards and catamarans, died at age 80 , leaving as his legacy a flotilla of floating devices, beginning with the first lighter-than-wood polyurethane foam surfboard crafted more than 50 years ago. But Alter was...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1993 | DEBRA CANO
Famous surfboards, mystery surfboards and nostalgic surfboards will be unveiled today as part of a new exhibit at the International Surfing Museum in Huntington Beach. The opening coincides with the museum's third anniversary at its temporary site, 411 Olive St. Plans are to one day build a permanent museum at the base of the Huntington Beach Pier. The celebration, which will also feature entertainment by the Boardwalkers, a surf music group, will be held from 4 to 7 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | Mike Anton
When he was a young man, Hobie Alter had a clear vision of his future: He didn't want a job that would require hard-soled shoes, and he didn't want to work east of Pacific Coast Highway. He succeeded. The son of a second-generation orange grower, Alter is credited with innovations that allowed people who couldn't lift log slabs to surf and those who couldn't pay for yacht club memberships to sail. Share your memories: Hobie's contributions to SoCal culture Known practically everywhere with a coastline or a lake simply as "Hobie," Alter developed the mass-produced foam surfboard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1986
Two San Diego men were arraigned Friday on charges of possessing marijuana and trying to smuggle 20 pounds of the drug--hidden inside surfboards--into the United States from Mexico on Thursday, officials said. Michael L. Clark, 25, and Robert P. DiVentura, 31, were arrested after they tried several times Thursday to cross the Mexican border with the surfboards without going through U.S. Customs, federal Drug Enforcement Administration spokesman Bryan Cook said.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2005 | Michael Hiltzik
This being February, it's the slowest time of the year for Bruce Jones. He's perched in front of a computer screen in his walk-up Sunset Beach surf shop, pecking out packing labels for out-of-town shipments, while a salesclerk stands by to greet the customers who amble in every 10 or 20 minutes. A few months from now you won't be able to move in Jones' store because of the crush of the summertime surfing crowd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Michael Brindley's dream is to eventually have his own studio where he can create surreal space-and-ocean paintings on canvas. Meanwhile, he is winning national recognition for his surfboard art, a dozen examples of which were on display Tuesday at the Newport Pier. The occasion was a photo shoot for Brindley's portfolio, but the work also drew a crowd of admiring tourists and surfers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1996 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Terry Martin shaped his first surfboard in his San Diego garage as a junior high school student in 1952. He has been riding that wave ever since. Martin, now 58, is a shaper for Stewart Surfboards in San Clemente and an important cog in the multimillion-dollar surfing industry. He estimates he has created 30,000 surfboards since 1963, when he began working professionally. "There are no seasons in this business anymore.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1986 | JEFF ROWE, Jeff Rowe is a free-lance writer
Mike Borges wants to make it a better world--for surfers. Operating out of his Santa Ana apartment and from a rented mini-warehouse, Borges has unleashed on the surfing world a product that could revolutionize one of the oldest traditions of the sport--rubbing a gummy mixture of paraffin, beeswax and candle wax onto the deck of the board before paddling out. Borges has developed Ultra Deck, a clear, rubberized plastic that comes in spray cans and is applied to a surfboard deck like paint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1993 | JON NALICK
For 18-year-old Rich Harbour back in 1962, the choice was simple: Stay in college and pursue a career in architecture, or drop out and make surfboards. Architecture never stood a chance. "I was doing well (at classes at Orange Coast College) but I realized, that's not what I wanted to do. I don't know how much you like sitting at a desk, but that's not me. I like freedom." Now, nearly 15,000 surfboards later, Harbour, 49, is known throughout the world as one of the best board shapers around.
HOME & GARDEN
June 29, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Wanted to warn that I'm not a particularly skilled surfer, but I think you would just assume that. Basically, I excel at nothing in particular, though I did win the father-son fantasy football league last season and am poised to repeat. I'm also a pretty good public speaker. Imagine a snarkier Winston Churchill. Remember that for your next company event. My fee is a mere $1 million, but for that I also clean up afterward and unburden you of all your leftover Leinenkugel. I also line a pretty good batter's box, though the umpire at last week's Pony League tournament kept smothering the back line with his shoe, believing it was a little too deep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As one of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory "rocket boys," engineer Herman Bank had already helped launch the Space Age when wobbly surfboards strapped atop his station wagon in the early 1960s led him to another design frontier. After securing his cargo alongside a Los Angeles freeway, Bank puzzled over how to make the era's nearly 10-foot-long boards easier to transport. A son who surfed persuaded him that the answer was to slice them in two. By 1966, Bank had come up with a way to cut a surfboard in half so it could be taken apart for travel and bolted back together at the beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2012 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
Well into his 70s, Terry Martin could be found most days in his Dana Point workshop sanding blocks of polyurethane foam into precision-shaped surfboards. With his big white beard and barrel chest, Martin looked like Santa riding out a blizzard of swirling white dust. Over a nearly six-decade career, Martin is said to have shaped more surfboards than anyone - some 80,000 - although the exact number is unknowable. Martin himself once said he stopped counting after 50,000. Martin's output and perfectionism made him an icon among the tight-knit fraternity of surfing's best shapers, one of a dwindling number of craftsmen who earn a living making surfboards by hand.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2011 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
Surfboard manufacturers have a number of concerns — heavy competition, expensive shipping and employees who occasionally like to slip out early when there's a good break. Product liability lawsuits typically aren't one of their worries. That's what makes a lawsuit that recreational surfer Tom Gregg filed against Channel Islands Surfboards a little unusual. Gregg contends that a fin on his Channel Islands board cut a deep gash on his right leg when he wiped out off the coast of France in 2009.
TRAVEL
November 7, 2010 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times staff writer
If you plan to fly with your favorite board to catch gnarly surf, get ready for a wild ride - financially, that is. Many airlines charge $100 or more each way to take surfboards as checked baggage. A few charge nothing. So check it out before you check it in. And be glad you're not a professional surfer. "It's mind-blowing how expensive it is to travel with surfboards," said Hawaiian pro surfer Fred Patacchia Jr. "I just recently went to Europe on American Airlines and was charged $150 per board, traveling with nine boards.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2010
POP MUSIC Norah Jones In support of her fourth album, "The Fall," Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Norah Jones presents an evening of rootsy torch songs. British singer-songwriter Corinne Bailey Rae, who in the past few years has become almost as much of a concert draw as Jones, will be opening. Santa Barbara Bowl , 1122 N. Milpas St., Santa Barbara. 7 p.m. $48.50-$73.50. (805) 962-7411. www.sbbowl.org . EVENTS The Art of Surfboard Shaping For the dedicated, surfing is more than a sport — it's a spiritual pursuit, and that means surfboard shapers like Scott Anderson are akin to shamans.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1992 | Chris Woodyard / Times staff writer
Jack's Surfboards in Huntington Beach has moved a little farther up Main Street so that its store can be rebuilt as part of the city's downtown redevelopment. The store will return with a nostalgic surfing theme. It will have a replica of part of the old wooden pier that dominated the city for decades before being replaced recently, as well as big-screen surfing videos and a mural of how the store has looked over the years. The work is expected to take nine months.
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | JENNIFER ANDERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Anderson is a Los Angeles free-lance writer. and
In 1949, surfing was simple. The few surfers who rode the waves along California's then-pristine coastline wore tans, not Body Gloves. With high-tech designs still a way off, boards were rough-hewn planks of redwood, cedar or balsa, and they were shaped in back yards, garages and at a little-known spot beneath the Manhattan Beach Pier called the Manhattan Surfing Club. Nobody had heard of Gidget or the Beach Boys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2010 | By Mike Anton
Surfing's dirty secret is easy to find in the drab enclave of San Clemente known as the surf ghetto, where the ocean breeze is spiked with the sweet smell of chemicals and men wearing flip-flops and coated with white dust search for magic inside blocks of toxic foam. Joey Santley is looking for something equally elusive: an environmentally friendly surfboard. Or at least one with a carbon footprint that's less titanic. "A 'green surfboard' is inherently an oxymoron at this point," said Santley, 44, a frenetic surfboard shaper and entrepreneur.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2009 | Tony Perry
A 30-year-old Mexican national was arrested while trying to smuggle 24 pounds of marijuana ashore on a surfboard, the U.S. Border Patrol said. The suspect was spotted Sunday morning paddling north about 200 yards off Imperial Beach, near the Mexican border. When agents ordered the surfer to come ashore, he threw a blue duffel bag into the water, the Border Patrol said. Agents went into the water to make the arrest.
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