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Surfers Walk Of Fame

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2003 | Joy L. Woodson, Times Staff Writer
Roger Bacon doesn't surf. He fishes. And he doesn't live in Hermosa Beach, either. He lives in neighboring Redondo Beach. But for four years, the rather insistent businessman has been spearheading an effort to create a Surfers Walk of Fame in Hermosa Beach. So what's in it for him? Good karma? Bacon does happen to have a brother who was a surfer. He also owns substantial property in the area, including a shopping center in Hermosa Beach.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Mary Kerwin Riehl, who won the women's division of the 1939 Pacific Coast Surfing Championship and who is the only female surfing pioneer honored on the Hermosa Beach Surfers Walk of Fame, has died. She was 91. Riehl died March 16 in a Santa Maria, Calif., care facility after suffering a stroke several weeks earlier.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1994 | Greg Johnson, Times staff writer
Surf's up in Orange County. On Saturday, the nation's first surfing walk of fame will be dedicated on the corner of Main Street and Pacific Coast Highway in Huntington Beach. On June 3, "The Endless Summer II," a long-awaited sequel to the classic surf film that made its debut in 1963, will open on screens around the country. The next day, the Surf Industry Manufacturers Assn. will hold its fifth-annual Waterman's Ball, a fund-raiser designed to support three ocean-related organizations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2004 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
Some might say Hermosa Beach's newest public arts project is totally gnarly. The exhibit, appropriately called "Surfin' Hermosa 2004," opens today, with 20 surfboards displayed throughout the city. Each of the 6-foot-tall foam and fiberglass boards features a different design. Among the variety of artists, there's Brian Boylan, an Irish native with a thick brogue who gave up a successful career in animation to paint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2006 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Introduced in the early 1950s, wetsuits flopped among surfers, who saw the uncomfortable rubber skins as more suitable for wimps than wave riders. Enter Bill Meistrell, a dive-shop owner who used a synthetic called neoprene to create a lighter, more flexible suit. At first, his suits were sold under the label Thermocline until his friend Duke Boyd, a founder of Hang Ten, said the name was terrible. "What's so good about your suit?" Boyd asked. "Well, it fits like a glove," Meistrell replied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Dale "The Hawk" Velzy, the pioneering master shaper of surfboards who helped popularize the Hawaiian sport of surfing along the California coast, has died. He was 77. Velzy, a longtime smoker, died of lung cancer Thursday at Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center in Mission Viejo.
NEWS
September 11, 1996 | LAURA ACCINELLI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Girls have come a long way since Gidget. They travel into outer space. They sit on the Supreme Court. And they surf the world's waves--confidently and in new shorts that stay in their place, unlike the women who wear them. Surfing is being forced to confront its contradictions: Avowedly countercultural, it is also traditionally chauvinistic.
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