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Surfing Culture

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NEWS
November 9, 1996 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The waves are frigid, inconsistent and "sharky." Tolerance for being spun like a piece of laundry in an industrial washing machine is required. Ghostly plumes of smelly vapor rise from a nearby paper mill. Malibu, it's not. Under a white-gray sky in a light rain, a dozen men and one woman park their four-wheel drives on the north jetty, strip to nakedness and don wetsuits--neoprene 5 millimeters thick, with hoods and booties. They tuck their surfboards under their arms and hit the morning waves.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Hobie Alter, who shaped Southern California's signature surf culture by pioneering the mass-produced foam surfboard and later popularized sailing by inventing a lightweight, high-performance catamaran, died Saturday at his home in Palm Desert. He was 80. The announcement of Alter's death was posted on www.hobie.com , his company's website. No cause was disclosed. Full obituary: Hobie Alter dies at 80 A self-taught design innovator and entrepreneur whose “Hobie” brand earned him a fortune, Alter was nonetheless a reluctant businessman who eschewed suits for cutoffs and was guided by his imagination above all else.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2010 | Hector Tobar
If you owned a surfboard 20, 40 or even 60 years ago, and used it often, there's a group of people in San Clemente who would really like to hear from you. Maybe you surfed a stretch of coastline when the waves were taller than they are today — because a certain harbor and breakwater didn't exist back then. Maybe you surfed in a time and place where few others did. Like Dick Huffman, now 98, who would go out to the beaches of Corona del Mar in the 1920s with a bathing suit, some lumber and an ax, and make his own board before heading into the water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
LeRoy Grannis, a noted photographer whose widely printed images captured and popularized the surf culture of California as it exploded in the 1960s and '70s, has died. He was 93. Grannis, who also co-founded what is now Surfing magazine, died Thursday of natural causes at a Torrance nursing facility, said his son John. "There's surfing royalty, and he was one of the kings," his son said. "He inspired so many big-name photographers that consider him their mentor. " FOR THE RECORD: LeRoy Grannis: In the Feb. 5 LATExtra section, the obituary of photographer LeRoy Grannis, whose images popularized the surf culture, included a photo with a caption that said he co-founded what is now Surfer magazine.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, Patrice Apodaca covers economic issues for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-5979 and at patrice.apodaca@latimes.com
Denise Denison-Erkeneff, president of the Orange County Ad Club, and her husband, Rick, want to get the message out that surfing represents serious business and is a major contributor to the economy. The pair, who run their own ad agency, R&D Graphics and Marketing in Dana Point, are organizing an Ad Club event Thursday night called Tapping the Source, in which they'll discuss the ways surf imagery is used to sell products, both inside and outside the surf world.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
The endless summer is over in Orange Country -- that is, the Laguna Art Museum's big surfing show is done -- but a similar swell is rolling toward the usually landlocked Autry Museum of Western Heritage in Los Angeles. The Laguna museum show, "Surf Culture: The Art History of Surfing," ran from late July through Oct. 6 amid blockbuster treatment, from extended museum hours to boosted prices. One critic called the show "profoundly confused and poorly presented."
NEWS
July 27, 1990
Surfing has emblazoned American culture with many images and symbols over the past 30 years. It has inspired movies from "Endless Summer" to "Beach Blanket Bingo", influenced rock 'n' roll, and to this day set trends in fashion from coast to coast. WHEELS Immortalized by the hit song "Surf City," wood-paneled station wagons like this 1940 Ford were the sterotypical mode of transportation for surfers in the 1950s and 1960s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | Mike Anton
When he was a young man, Hobie Alter had a clear vision of his future: He didn't want a job that would require hard-soled shoes, and he didn't want to work east of Pacific Coast Highway. He succeeded. The son of a second-generation orange grower, Alter is credited with innovations that allowed people who couldn't lift log slabs to surf and those who couldn't pay for yacht club memberships to sail. Share your memories: Hobie's contributions to SoCal culture Known practically everywhere with a coastline or a lake simply as "Hobie," Alter developed the mass-produced foam surfboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2008 | Don Patterson
The question is less about what the five panelists of "Surf Culture: Shooting the Tube" are going to talk about Sunday and more about what they'll have time to talk about. Like a lot of offerings at this weekend's sprawling Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, this panel is more of a sampler platter of food for thought than a full-course meal. In its raw form, surfing can be defined in three simple parts: a wave, a board, a person. But the fictional and nonfictional writings of this session's experts -- Antoine Wilson, Steve Hawk, Steven Kotler, Kem Nunn and David Rensin -- reflect life's struggles, rebellion, the inner workings of the human spirit -- and how do you wedge all that into an hour?
BOOKS
July 2, 1995 | CHARLOTTE INNES
Paula Gunn Allen, from her poem Du Bist, at the Lesbian Writers Series: "in Cubero outsiders make a strange clan, connected by blood, proximity, shared events, history, fate. comadre, compadre, primo, amte, guwatze, how are you and oiga! que pasa, qu'estas'ciendo, dude!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2010 | Hector Tobar
If you owned a surfboard 20, 40 or even 60 years ago, and used it often, there's a group of people in San Clemente who would really like to hear from you. Maybe you surfed a stretch of coastline when the waves were taller than they are today — because a certain harbor and breakwater didn't exist back then. Maybe you surfed in a time and place where few others did. Like Dick Huffman, now 98, who would go out to the beaches of Corona del Mar in the 1920s with a bathing suit, some lumber and an ax, and make his own board before heading into the water.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2008 | Don Patterson
The question is less about what the five panelists of "Surf Culture: Shooting the Tube" are going to talk about Sunday and more about what they'll have time to talk about. Like a lot of offerings at this weekend's sprawling Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, this panel is more of a sampler platter of food for thought than a full-course meal. In its raw form, surfing can be defined in three simple parts: a wave, a board, a person. But the fictional and nonfictional writings of this session's experts -- Antoine Wilson, Steve Hawk, Steven Kotler, Kem Nunn and David Rensin -- reflect life's struggles, rebellion, the inner workings of the human spirit -- and how do you wedge all that into an hour?
NEWS
January 18, 2005 | Pamm Higgins
You see a surfer on an advertisement or a postcard and think, "This guy never owned a pair of pants in his life." But do you roll your eyes and dispatch him with the thought, "What a loser"? No, argues Jim Heimann in the introduction to "Surfing," a collection of vintage surfing graphics published by Taschen. Lots of folks, particularly those who live far from the epicenters of beach culture, extract a heady vibe from looking at a wave rider. Surfers personify freedom.
NEWS
September 30, 2004 | Don Patterson, Special to The Times
You begin with a simple search for the toilet seat skateboard, the one mentioned on the International Surfing Museum website. This is core, you think. What could offer a better glimpse of skateboarding's 50-year history than seeing its most essential piece of equipment constructed from the most essential piece of equipment in your house? Regrettably, the museum doesn't have one on display.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2003 | Joy L. Woodson, Times Staff Writer
Roger Bacon doesn't surf. He fishes. And he doesn't live in Hermosa Beach, either. He lives in neighboring Redondo Beach. But for four years, the rather insistent businessman has been spearheading an effort to create a Surfers Walk of Fame in Hermosa Beach. So what's in it for him? Good karma? Bacon does happen to have a brother who was a surfer. He also owns substantial property in the area, including a shopping center in Hermosa Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
The endless summer is over in Orange Country -- that is, the Laguna Art Museum's big surfing show is done -- but a similar swell is rolling toward the usually landlocked Autry Museum of Western Heritage in Los Angeles. The Laguna museum show, "Surf Culture: The Art History of Surfing," ran from late July through Oct. 6 amid blockbuster treatment, from extended museum hours to boosted prices. One critic called the show "profoundly confused and poorly presented."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1988 | NANCY WRIDE, Times Staff Writer
Before Gidget met Moondoggie, when downtown Huntington Beach still had a saltwater plunge, Gordie Duane was making surfboards. Out of balsa wood. In the heart of what would become a worldwide surfing capital, he opened Huntington Beach's founding surfboard shop--a Hawaiian-looking place at the oceanfront corner of 13th Street and Pacific Coast Highway.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
Every year around this time, in between their usual encounters with truth, beauty, scholarship and donor-cultivation, the museum directors of North America can be seen facing another humbling challenge: How can their indoor spaces compete with the great outdoors on a sunny summer day? The answer this year, if you're the Laguna Art Museum, is to paddle with the prevailing tide. That is, to mount a show on the cultural implications of surfing.
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