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Surfing Heritage Foundation

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2010 | Hector Tobar
If you owned a surfboard 20, 40 or even 60 years ago, and used it often, there's a group of people in San Clemente who would really like to hear from you. Maybe you surfed a stretch of coastline when the waves were taller than they are today — because a certain harbor and breakwater didn't exist back then. Maybe you surfed in a time and place where few others did. Like Dick Huffman, now 98, who would go out to the beaches of Corona del Mar in the 1920s with a bathing suit, some lumber and an ax, and make his own board before heading into the water.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2010 | Hector Tobar
If you owned a surfboard 20, 40 or even 60 years ago, and used it often, there's a group of people in San Clemente who would really like to hear from you. Maybe you surfed a stretch of coastline when the waves were taller than they are today — because a certain harbor and breakwater didn't exist back then. Maybe you surfed in a time and place where few others did. Like Dick Huffman, now 98, who would go out to the beaches of Corona del Mar in the 1920s with a bathing suit, some lumber and an ax, and make his own board before heading into the water.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2012
An Oklahoma hospital in Garth Brooks' hometown must pay $1 million to the country singer because it failed to build a women's health center in honor of his late mother, jurors ruled Tuesday. Jurors ruled that the hospital must return a $500,000 donation to Brooks plus pay him $500,000 in punitive damages in Brooks' breach-of-contract lawsuit against IntegrisCanadian Valley Regional Hospital in Yukon. Brooks said he thought he'd reached a deal in 2005 but sued after learning the hospital wanted to use the money for other construction projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2008 | Pauline OConnor
Dangling ON the southernmost tip of Orange County is the affable beach town nicknamed "the Spanish Village by the Sea," San Clemente. It was conjured into existence by Ole Hanson, an entrepreneur and former mayor of Seattle, who bought the coastal tract in 1925 and required all houses built on it to be constructed with whitewashed stucco walls and handmade red-tile roofs. The same creative restriction applied to civic buildings in the town's hilly center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2003 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
The hang-loose, live-for-today world of surfing has never spent much time looking back. But a group of surfers, many well into their golden years, have decided to become curators for their sport, collecting the memories, the hardware and the images of an obsession that shaped Southern California culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
As one of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory "rocket boys," engineer Herman Bank had already helped launch the Space Age when wobbly surfboards strapped atop his station wagon in the early 1960s led him to another design frontier. After securing his cargo alongside a Los Angeles freeway, Bank puzzled over how to make the era's nearly 10-foot-long boards easier to transport. A son who surfed persuaded him that the answer was to slice them in two. By 1966, Bank had come up with a way to cut a surfboard in half so it could be taken apart for travel and bolted back together at the beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | Mike Anton
When he was a young man, Hobie Alter had a clear vision of his future: He didn't want a job that would require hard-soled shoes, and he didn't want to work east of Pacific Coast Highway. He succeeded. The son of a second-generation orange grower, Alter is credited with innovations that allowed people who couldn't lift log slabs to surf and those who couldn't pay for yacht club memberships to sail. Share your memories: Hobie's contributions to SoCal culture Known practically everywhere with a coastline or a lake simply as "Hobie," Alter developed the mass-produced foam surfboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2006 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
THE 18-year-old surfer girl with the sun-bleached hair is breathing heavily and turning bright red as she approaches her idol, a diminutive grandmother who is signing books after a lecture on surfing history at UC San Diego. Tears well up in the girl's eyes when she comes face to face with Kathy Kohner Zuckerman, the plucky surfing icon known to the world as "Gidget." "You are my hero," the girl stammers.
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