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Surfing Walk Of Fame

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1994 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Borrowing a page out of Hollywood Boulevard's famous sidewalk, Orange County's Surf City is putting the finishing touches on its downtown redevelopment with a Surfing Walk of Fame beginning at Main Street and Pacific Coast Highway. The idea, organizers say, is to recognize surfing's pioneers, champions, local heroes and people who who have contributed to the sport's lifestyle and culture. The first name on the walkway's 2-foot by 2-foot granite stones is Hawaiian surfing pioneer Duke Kahanamoku.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1998 | JOHN POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jack O'Neill began riding the waves about 50 years ago, surfers would cover themselves in petroleum jelly and tape wool sweaters to their bodies to try to stay warm. But thanks to O'Neill's workshop experiments, which resulted in the first functional surfing wetsuit in 1952, the sport became accessible year-round and surfers could abandon their soggy sweaters.
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NEWS
August 5, 1994 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although it shares a name with its more flamboyant Hollywood cousin, the inauguration of the Surfing Walk of Fame on Thursday was hardly a glitzy affair. In fact, it was unapologetically down-home. About 80 people--many of them wearing shorts and flip-flops--hooted and howled as the inductees were announced. And the Walk of Famers did not sashay up to the microphone in designer attire flashing million-dollar smiles for the paparazzi. This is Surf City, U.S.A., after all, not Tinseltown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He may have ridden 30-foot waves in Hawaii's Waimea Bay, but when it came to giving a speech before an audience on Thursday, Greg Noll was humbled. "I'm not used to doing this," said surfing's 59-year-old pioneer, who is regarded as one of the bravest and best big-wave riders in surfing history. "When I was a kid, I would never have believed I would be honored in the same company you have here for your Walk of Fame. Thanks."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forsaking glitz and glamour, the Surfing Walk of Fame was inaugurated Thursday. It was hardly like the hoopla when a star is added to Hollywood's Walk of Fame. But then, this is Huntington Beach. And, these are legendary surfers, more known for attacking giant waves on surfboards than posturing before cameras and sipping mineral water with a spritz of lime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1998 | JOHN POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jack O'Neill began riding the waves about 50 years ago, surfers would cover themselves in petroleum jelly and tape wool sweaters to their bodies to try to stay warm. But thanks to O'Neill's workshop experiments, which resulted in the first functional surfing wetsuit in 1952, the sport became accessible year-round and surfers could abandon their soggy sweaters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1995 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Hollywood movie stars pressing their hands and feet into cement for posterity, some of surfing's celebrities gathered at Huntington Beach on Thursday to see their names immortalized in granite on the Main Street sidewalk. * Six new names were added to the Surfing Walk of Fame, which began last year as a tribute to surfing and its close relationship with Huntington Beach, which is also known as Surf City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He may have ridden 30-foot waves in Hawaii's Waimea Bay, but when it came to giving a speech before an audience on Thursday, Greg Noll was humbled. "I'm not used to doing this," said surfing's 59-year-old pioneer, who is regarded as one of the bravest and best big-wave riders in surfing history. "When I was a kid, I would never have believed I would be honored in the same company you have here for your Walk of Fame. Thanks."
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
Wave riding enthusiasts dedicated a Surfing Walk of Fame on Saturday to pay homage to the sport's pioneers, competitors and culture. "I take great pride in being able to say I'm the best surfer in the United States Congress," Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Huntington Beach), an avid surfer, told about 100 people gathered under sunny skies for the ceremony. "Of course, some people do point out that I'm the only surfer in the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1994 | Greg Johnson / Times staff writer
Surfing Walk of Fame: On Aug. 4, as part of the U.S. Open of Surfing, the International Surfing Museum will induct its first members into the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame. The 10 a.m. ceremony will include five inductees, including the posthumous induction of surfing great Duke Kahanamoku. Honorees will have their namesinscribed in granite stones that are being placed in the sidewalk at Pacific Coast Highway and Main Street in downtown Huntington Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1995 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Hollywood movie stars pressing their hands and feet into cement for posterity, some of surfing's celebrities gathered at Huntington Beach on Thursday to see their names immortalized in granite on the Main Street sidewalk. * Six new names were added to the Surfing Walk of Fame, which began last year as a tribute to surfing and its close relationship with Huntington Beach, which is also known as Surf City.
NEWS
August 5, 1994 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although it shares a name with its more flamboyant Hollywood cousin, the inauguration of the Surfing Walk of Fame on Thursday was hardly a glitzy affair. In fact, it was unapologetically down-home. About 80 people--many of them wearing shorts and flip-flops--hooted and howled as the inductees were announced. And the Walk of Famers did not sashay up to the microphone in designer attire flashing million-dollar smiles for the paparazzi. This is Surf City, U.S.A., after all, not Tinseltown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forsaking glitz and glamour, the Surfing Walk of Fame was inaugurated Thursday. It was hardly like the hoopla when a star is added to Hollywood's Walk of Fame. But then, this is Huntington Beach. And, these are legendary surfers, more known for attacking giant waves on surfboards than posturing before cameras and sipping mineral water with a spritz of lime.
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
Wave riding enthusiasts dedicated a Surfing Walk of Fame on Saturday to pay homage to the sport's pioneers, competitors and culture. "I take great pride in being able to say I'm the best surfer in the United States Congress," Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Huntington Beach), an avid surfer, told about 100 people gathered under sunny skies for the ceremony. "Of course, some people do point out that I'm the only surfer in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1994 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Borrowing a page out of Hollywood Boulevard's famous sidewalk, Orange County's Surf City is putting the finishing touches on its downtown redevelopment with a Surfing Walk of Fame beginning at Main Street and Pacific Coast Highway. The idea, organizers say, is to recognize surfing's pioneers, champions, local heroes and people who who have contributed to the sport's lifestyle and culture. The first name on the walkway's 2-foot by 2-foot granite stones is Hawaiian surfing pioneer Duke Kahanamoku.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2000 | Kenneth Ma, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
Nine new members have been inducted to the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame. A crowd of 150 gathered at Pacific Coast Highway and Main Street last week for a ceremony honoring people who have made significant achievements in the surfing community. This year's inductees are Mark Occhilupo, Bud Llamas, Greg MacGillivray, the late Jim Freeman, the late Nancy Katin, Gerry Lopez, Eddie Aikau, Mike Abdelmuti and George Farquhar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1998
In what has become one of the more appealing rites of summer, the Surfing Walk of Fame in Huntington Beach has inducted seven new members. Those living outside California may think of surfers as beach layabouts with no interest in anything but wave height. Indeed, movies and advertising have latched onto the surfer's word "dude" and transformed it into the signature utterance of someone whose intelligence is less than top-drawer. The reality, fortunately, is different.
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