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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
For Bob Meistrell, there was always something about the water. After he and his brother, Bill, taught themselves to swim in a Missouri pond, one would man a bicycle pump on shore and the other would throw on a diving helmet fashioned from a 5-gallon vegetable can, a pane of glass, a scoop of tar and - connecting to the pump - a garden hose. A few decades later, the identical twins, who moved to Southern California as teens, started a company whose wetsuits enabled surfers to stay in the water longer and more comfortably than ever before.
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February 28, 2014 | Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
It wasn't Windansea Beach itself but a detour taken while trying to find a parking spot there that led to the mother lode of inspiration for Jonathan Cohen's spring collection. The 28-year-old designer, who grew up near the fabled beach in La Jolla and is now based in New York, had recently reread "The Pump House Gang," Tom Wolfe's 1968 story about rowdy teens who hung out at the pump house at Windansea, defending their sandy turf from the over-25 set. When he was home last March, Cohen was determined to see the place with fresh eyes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Philip "Flippy" Hoffman, a pioneer of big-wave riding in Hawaii in the 1950s and the co-owner of Mission Viejo-based Hoffman California Fabrics, which supplies printed textiles to the surfwear, quilt and craft industries, has died. He was 80. Hoffman, a Capistrano Beach resident, died Wednesday at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo of complications related to pulmonary disease, said his son, Marty. FOR THE RECORD: Philip Hoffman: A photograph that accompanied the obituary of big-wave surfer and businessman Philip "Flippy" Hoffman in the Nov. 16 LATExtra section was credited to Jeff Devine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2013
Lian Murray Surf clothing designer Lian Murray, 54, an innovator in surfwear design who helped build the Hurley brand to prominence in the field, died Nov. 3 at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach, several days after suffering an acute asthma attack, said her mother, Elyse Lewin. Murray had suffered from asthma since she was a child, Lewin said. "She created trends and avoided fads," said Bob Hurley, founder of the company, in a statement. He said that her designs included low-rise pants and unfinished hems.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1987 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
Catch a wave and you're sittin' on top of the world. --Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys Remember all those laid-back loafers who used to hang out constantly at the beach and lived to surf? Well, some of them didn't turn out so bad. A growing group of surfers are running their own surfwear companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2013
Lian Murray Surf clothing designer Lian Murray, 54, an innovator in surfwear design who helped build the Hurley brand to prominence in the field, died Nov. 3 at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach, several days after suffering an acute asthma attack, said her mother, Elyse Lewin. Murray had suffered from asthma since she was a child, Lewin said. "She created trends and avoided fads," said Bob Hurley, founder of the company, in a statement. He said that her designs included low-rise pants and unfinished hems.
HOME & GARDEN
May 29, 2010 | Emily Young
Poured-in-place concrete walls. Glued, laminated Douglas fir beams. A galvanized steel roof. Architect Ruth Hasell's emphatically modern home in Orange County isn't just a rejection of the phony French castles and wannabe Tuscan villas proliferating in nearby housing developments. It's also her vision of what more homes in Southern California could — and should — look like. "I wanted the house to be a vivid reflection of built work that was Californian and a direct response to our time and to this place," she says, "not a dim reflection of a misremembered style from another lifetime and another continent."
IMAGE
February 28, 2014 | Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
It wasn't Windansea Beach itself but a detour taken while trying to find a parking spot there that led to the mother lode of inspiration for Jonathan Cohen's spring collection. The 28-year-old designer, who grew up near the fabled beach in La Jolla and is now based in New York, had recently reread "The Pump House Gang," Tom Wolfe's 1968 story about rowdy teens who hung out at the pump house at Windansea, defending their sandy turf from the over-25 set. When he was home last March, Cohen was determined to see the place with fresh eyes.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1998
Bill Sharp, who helped transform Katin Inc. surfwear from a storefront operation into a multimillion-dollar business, has resigned as president of the Costa Mesa-based company. He declined to say why he left the company, which was purchased last year by Los Angeles-based ski and snowboard maker K2 Inc. K2 also declined to comment. Earlier this year, Sharp, 37, was heralded as the creative force behind the K2 Big Wave Challenge, a surfing contest timed to coincide with K2's foray into surfwear.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1996 | Greg Johnson, Greg Johnson covers retail businesses and restaurants for The Times
In the surf-wear industry, 25 years is a lifetime. But that's how long Ocean Pacific, one of the industry's oldest names, has been around. The Irvine-based company will celebrate a quarter century in the apparel industry with a birthday bash tonight during the Magic menswear trade show in Las Vegas. The Hawaiian-themed party will feature the Brian Setzer Orchestra and a swaying group of Hawaiian dancers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
For Bob Meistrell, there was always something about the water. After he and his brother, Bill, taught themselves to swim in a Missouri pond, one would man a bicycle pump on shore and the other would throw on a diving helmet fashioned from a 5-gallon vegetable can, a pane of glass, a scoop of tar and - connecting to the pump - a garden hose. A few decades later, the identical twins, who moved to Southern California as teens, started a company whose wetsuits enabled surfers to stay in the water longer and more comfortably than ever before.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | By Bryce Alderton
A retired professional surfer who co-founded Gotcha surfwear was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence and on suspicion of cocaine possession after a traffic accident in Laguna Beach, police said Wednesday. Police charged Michael Elliot Tomson, 58, of Laguna Beach with two felony counts of DUI and possession of a controlled substance, as well as a misdemeanor count of being under the influence of drugs, Laguna Beach police Capt. Jason Kravetz said in an email. Tomson posted $100,000 bail and was released.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Philip "Flippy" Hoffman, a pioneer of big-wave riding in Hawaii in the 1950s and the co-owner of Mission Viejo-based Hoffman California Fabrics, which supplies printed textiles to the surfwear, quilt and craft industries, has died. He was 80. Hoffman, a Capistrano Beach resident, died Wednesday at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo of complications related to pulmonary disease, said his son, Marty. FOR THE RECORD: Philip Hoffman: A photograph that accompanied the obituary of big-wave surfer and businessman Philip "Flippy" Hoffman in the Nov. 16 LATExtra section was credited to Jeff Devine.
HOME & GARDEN
May 29, 2010 | Emily Young
Poured-in-place concrete walls. Glued, laminated Douglas fir beams. A galvanized steel roof. Architect Ruth Hasell's emphatically modern home in Orange County isn't just a rejection of the phony French castles and wannabe Tuscan villas proliferating in nearby housing developments. It's also her vision of what more homes in Southern California could — and should — look like. "I wanted the house to be a vivid reflection of built work that was Californian and a direct response to our time and to this place," she says, "not a dim reflection of a misremembered style from another lifetime and another continent."
BUSINESS
June 6, 2005 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
It was the last night of its annual conference, and the Tribe, as the surf industry calls itself, was stoked. Clothing makers, sales directors, marketing experts and shop owners gathered on the beach for an awards ceremony. When Volcom Inc. of Costa Mesa was named manufacturer of the year, supporters chanted "Wool-y, Wool-y" as pals carried the company's chief executive to the stage.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2003 | Abigail Goldman, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge said Monday that a jury would have to decide whether surf-wear giant Quiksilver Inc. or a small Los Angeles clothing maker first used the "Roxy" trademark, which Quiksilver has built into a $200-million-plus brand for girls. In his ruling, U.S. District Judge Dickran Tevrizian denied requests by Quiksilver and Kymsta Corp., which each sought to establish that it was the first to use the name on teen clothes.
NEWS
January 4, 1991 | NEIL FEINEMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Feineman is the editor of Beach Culture magazine.
For a while it looked as if the surfwear industry was living out an Endless Summer. Neon swim trunks, T-shirts emblazoned with surf company logos and beach shorts covered with surfer graffiti were the hottest items in young adult wardrobes from California to Iowa. Beachwear manufacturers that started as cottage industries, such as Jimmy' Z, Vision Streetwear and Maui and Sons, became emblazoned on the national consciousness. There were fortunes to be made.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1988 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
Will success spoil the surfwear companies? As the industry has swelled to 300 to 400 companies--a third of them in Orange County beach towns--surfwear manufacturers have had to become more competitive. One way is by introducing new clothing lines. By coming up with a new label--particularly if the name appeals to skateboarders--manufacturers can attract more customers.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2003 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
Take a walk through the picture-postcard heart of this coastal town, past diners lingering over lunch at La Crepe Bretonne, and you might think you were in Laguna Beach. The surf-wear shops are lined up like boards on the beach: Roxy, Rip Curl Girl, Billabong and Quiksilver Boardriders Club. In the village of St. Jean de Luz, teenagers strolling the cobblestone streets are decked out in Volcom sweatshirts and sneakers from Vans.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2003 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
Quiksilver Inc. continued riding a wave it caught last year, doubling its profit in its fiscal first quarter and beating Wall Street expectations. The Huntington Beach-based company -- the world's largest surfwear maker -- said Thursday that net income in the quarter ended Jan. 31 was $6.6 million, or 24 cents a share, compared with $3.1 million, or 13 cents a share, in the same period the year before. Revenue was up 31% to $192.1 million with sales strong in all divisions.
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