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January 17, 2014 | By Monte Morin, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The U.S. surgeon general is calling on Hollywood to kick the tobacco habit, saying too many youth-rated films contain harmful images of tobacco use. In a new report on smoking released Friday, acting Surgeon General Boris Lushniak and other U.S. health officials greatly expanded the list of tobacco's damaging health effects and urged renewed focus on reducing national smoking rates.  Among dozens of findings and recommendations, the report found...
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 23, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The National Rifle Assn. has a problem with Dr. Vivek Hallegere Murthy, President Obama's nominee for surgeon general, but it has nothing to do with Murthy's medical expertise. It's that Murthy thinks gun control is smart public health policy. Unfortunately, too many members of the Senate share the gun lobby's skewed view of the world, much to the detriment of the country and, it seems, to Murthy's chances of being confirmed. Murthy, an outspoken Obama supporter since before the 2008 election, earned an undergraduate degree at Harvard, an MBA from the Yale School of Management and a medical degree from the Yale School of Medicine; he teaches medicine at Harvard and is an attending physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston; he's served on a federal medical advisory board and is involved in medical nonprofit groups, all according to the White House.
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NEWS
June 14, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan has selected Maj. Gen. Murphy A. Chesney for promotion and assignment as the next Air Force surgeon general, the Pentagon said Thursday. He will replace Lt. Gen. Max B. Bralliar, who will retire on Aug. 1.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON - In recent years, the National Rifle Assn. has stepped into fights over judicial nominees it views as weak on 2nd Amendment rights, but its decision to oppose a surgeon general nominee takes the powerful lobby into new territory, expanding its campaign to a post that has no direct power to regulate guns. President Obama's nominee, Dr. Vivek H. Murthy, a Massachusetts internist and former emergency room doctor, has called for more stringent gun laws. But he also testified at his Senate confirmation hearing last month that he would not use the surgeon general's office as a bully pulpit to push for them.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Dr. Antonia C. Novello said today that she would be a voice for those who can't communicate for themselves if confirmed as surgeon general. Novello also said she would speak out against tobacco companies that target minorities. "I have always felt that I am here to speak for people who have never been able to communicate for themselves," Novello told the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources. "And, as a pediatrician, I have been the doctor of little people who have no voice in society."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1986
C. Everett Koop, the surgeon general of the United States, has issued a report on AIDS that draws the appropriate, compassionate and inescapably correct medical conclusions about the disease. AIDS is not passed by casual, non-sexual contact, the report says, so there is no public health reason to institute compulsory blood testing for the AIDS virus or to quarantine persons infected with it.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2009 | Mike Dorning
CNN medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta withdrew Thursday from consideration to be the next surgeon general, with the network and Obama administration officials attributing his decision to professional and family reasons amid a campaign by some liberal interest groups to block his selection. CNN reported that Gupta, a neurosurgeon, decided to withdraw so that he could continue to practice medicine, work as a journalist and spend more time with his family.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2009 | Noam N. Levey and Matea Gold
President-elect Barack Obama has asked Dr. Sanjay Gupta to be the next U.S. surgeon general, looking to a popular television personality to help provide a public face for his healthcare agenda. Best known as a health and medicine correspondent for CNN and CBS, Gupta, 39, is a practicing neurosurgeon in Atlanta and a member of the faculty at the Emory University School of Medicine. The surgeon general oversees some 6,000 officers in the commissioned corps of the Public Health Service.
OPINION
July 15, 2007
Re "Health official claims censorship," July 11 It is distressing yet hardly surprising to hear former surgeons general testify about the politics of sex in Washington. Dr. Richard H. Carmona's remarks powerfully confirm that the Bush administration's support for strict abstinence-only programs is politically motivated and comes at the expense of women's and girls' health.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON - In recent years, the National Rifle Assn. has stepped into fights over judicial nominees it views as weak on 2nd Amendment rights, but its decision to oppose a surgeon general nominee takes the powerful lobby into new territory, expanding its campaign to a post that has no direct power to regulate guns. President Obama's nominee, Dr. Vivek H. Murthy, a Massachusetts internist and former emergency room doctor, has called for more stringent gun laws. But he also testified at his Senate confirmation hearing last month that he would not use the surgeon general's office as a bully pulpit to push for them.
OPINION
February 7, 2014
Re "CVS' halt on tobacco wins praise," Business, Feb. 6 The following sign was posted in a small drugstore: "Dear Customers, As we are in business for your health, we no longer sell cigarettes. " The year was 1964. I was 13 years old and had helped my father, Harry Labinger, hang that sign after the surgeon general reported on the dangers of smoking. My father, a smoker, also quit smoking that day, cold turkey. It was a lesson in health, ethics and courage I have never forgotten.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON - President Obama's choice to become the next surgeon general spent much of his confirmation hearing Tuesday deflecting criticism from Republicans, who attacked him for his political activism, ties to the president and relative inexperience. Vivek Hallegere Murthy, who at 36 would be one of the youngest surgeon generals, was chided for advocating gun control in the aftermath of the December 2012 school shooting in Newtown, Conn., and for backing the Affordable Care Act as a co-founder of Doctors for America, formerly Doctors for Obama.
SCIENCE
January 17, 2014 | By Monte Morin, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The U.S. surgeon general is calling on Hollywood to kick the tobacco habit, saying too many youth-rated films contain harmful images of tobacco use. In a new report on smoking released Friday, acting Surgeon General Boris Lushniak and other U.S. health officials greatly expanded the list of tobacco's damaging health effects and urged renewed focus on reducing national smoking rates.  Among dozens of findings and recommendations, the report found...
OPINION
January 10, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The 1964 U.S. Surgeon General's report on smoking - the first official acknowledgment by the federal government that smoking kills - was an extraordinarily progressive document for its time. It swiftly led to a federal law that restricted tobacco advertising and required the now-familiar warning label on each pack of cigarettes. Yet there was nothing truly surprising about the conclusion of the report. Throughout the 1950s, scientists had been discovering various ways in which smoking took a toll on people's health.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2013 | By Marlene Cimons and Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - Dr. C. Everett Koop, who as U.S. surgeon general in the 1980s led high-profile campaigns to highlight the dangers of smoking and to mobilize the nation against an emerging AIDS epidemic, has died. He was 96. Koop died Monday at his home in New Hampshire, Susan Wills, a colleague at Koop's Dartmouth Institute, told the Associated  Press. The cause was not given. Unlike his predecessors and many of his successors, who were largely figureheads, Koop initiated a new era of influence for surgeons general by turning the post into a national bully pulpit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2013 | Thomas H. Maugh II and Marlene Cimons, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the mid-1980s, the emerging AIDS epidemic was a high-profile target of vocal conservatives. Politicians and the religious right called for sweeping measures against those diagnosed with AIDS, including quarantine of patients, mandatory screening of homosexuals for the AIDS virus and a host of other measures that would victimize patients and keep the disease and the diseased hidden from public light. But they did not reckon with Dr. C. Everett Koop, the religious and conservative surgeon general of the United States appointed by President Reagan.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Intense opposition from the National Rifle Assn. has all but doomed prospects for President Obama's nominee for surgeon general, officials said Saturday as pro-gun Senate Democrats peeled away from the White House on a volatile issue in an election year. Facing a potential high-profile setback for the president, the White House is not pushing for a vote to confirm Dr. Vivek Hallegere Murthy, a Harvard- and Yale-educated internist and former emergency room doctor who has advocated for stricter gun control laws, the officials said.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
More than 100 health organizations and municipal public health departments, along with more than two dozen scientists, have asked the U.S. surgeon general to issue a report on sugar-sweetened soft drinks - akin to the landmark 1964 report on tobacco. “Soda and other sugary drinks are the only food or beverage that has been directly linked to obesity, a major contributor to coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and some cancers and a cause of psychosocial problems,” reads the letter, sent Thursday to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.
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