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NEWS
December 10, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton fired outspoken Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders on Friday for telling an AIDS forum that she believes masturbation "perhaps should be taught" to schoolchildren. Ousting the most controversial official of his Administration, Clinton said Elders' comments reflect "differences with Administration policy and my own convictions, and have made it necessary for her to tender her resignation."
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NATIONAL
March 2, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
America's obesity epidemic will dwarf the threat of terrorism if the nation does not reduce the number of people who are severely overweight, the surgeon general said in Columbia. "Obesity is the terror within," Richard H. Carmona said in a University of South Carolina lecture. "Unless we do something about it, the magnitude of the dilemma will dwarf 9/11 or any other terrorist attempt. "Where will our soldiers and sailors and airmen come from?" he said.
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NATIONAL
March 2, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
America's obesity epidemic will dwarf the threat of terrorism if the nation does not reduce the number of people who are severely overweight, the surgeon general said in Columbia. "Obesity is the terror within," Richard H. Carmona said in a University of South Carolina lecture. "Unless we do something about it, the magnitude of the dilemma will dwarf 9/11 or any other terrorist attempt. "Where will our soldiers and sailors and airmen come from?" he said.
NEWS
November 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Surgeon General David Satcher, who riled the Bush White House over the issue of teaching sexual abstinence in schools, says he'll step down Feb. 13 when his four-year term ends. Satcher, who was appointed by President Clinton, drew criticism from the White House last summer after his office released a report that said there was no evidence showing the success of sexual education programs that promote abstinence while barring discussion of birth control.
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | JACQUELINE NEWMYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. surgeon general will require that cigar packages sold in the United States carry warning labels about the health risks associated with smoking them, a practice that has increased dramatically in recent years, federal officials said Monday. The labels will go a step further than those on cigarette packages, issuing for the first time a warning from the government about the health risks of secondhand tobacco smoke.
NEWS
February 3, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Thursday nominated Dr. Henry Foster Jr., a Nashville educator, obstetrician and gynecologist, as surgeon general to replace the controversial Joycelyn Elders, who was fired last December. Foster, 61, who founded a program that distributes condoms to youths and supported an organization that provides abortion counseling, appears to share many of Elders' views, particularly about combatting teen-age pregnancy.
NEWS
February 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
Dr. David Satcher, who rose from poverty to national prominence, was sworn in as surgeon general Friday, and he promised to give back to the nation that helped him. "I know the American dream does not end when it comes true," he said during the Oval Office ceremony. President Clinton said he expects Satcher to help explain the nation's complex health system, along with the stunning but sometimes confusing medical breakthroughs.
NEWS
April 26, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Clinton administration is preparing to nominate Dr. David Satcher, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as both the nation's surgeon general and assistant secretary of health. In the past, the positions--both advisors to the president on health issues--have been separate. White House spokesman Mike McCurry said the administration was considering nominating "someone who, as the military likes to say, would be dual-hatted." The nation's acting surgeon general, Dr.
NEWS
June 24, 1995 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
By the time it reached its climax this week, the bitter controversy over the nomination of Dr. Henry W. Foster Jr. as surgeon general had more to do with the practice of politics than the practice of medicine. And there were plenty of political points to gain and lose for partisans in both parties.
NEWS
June 22, 1995 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nomination of Dr. Henry W. Foster Jr. to be U.S. surgeon general was declared all but dead Wednesday after his Senate supporters fell three votes shy of forcing a confirmation vote. Under an agreement struck by Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) and Minority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.), a second and final attempt to break a threatened Republican filibuster on Foster's nomination is scheduled for today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher has a prescription for communities to begin fighting AIDS: Encourage education in homes, schools and churches; create a safe, comfortable treatment and testing environment; and promote healthy daily routines. "If we could really look at lifestyle and behavior, we could make a lot of progress," said Satcher, who was keynote speaker at an HIV prevention conference in Los Angeles on Wednesday. "The country needs to look at a model of community-based health care."
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring suicide a serious public health problem, U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher on Wednesday unveiled a national campaign to prevent suicide, which now claims more American lives than homicide. "Suicide has stolen lives around the world and across the centuries," Satcher said. "Meanings attributed to suicide and notions of what to do about it have varied with time and place--but suicide has continued to exact a relentless toll."
BUSINESS
January 18, 2001 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A report released Wednesday by Surgeon General David Satcher showing a scientific link between graphically violent television programming and increased aggression in children provoked applause from parent groups and lawmakers seeking to curb the use of violence in entertainment.
NEWS
January 17, 2001 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. surgeon general is poised to declare graphically violent television programming and video games harmful to children, marking a potential watershed in the debate over government regulation of entertainment.
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | JACQUELINE NEWMYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. surgeon general will require that cigar packages sold in the United States carry warning labels about the health risks associated with smoking them, a practice that has increased dramatically in recent years, federal officials said Monday. The labels will go a step further than those on cigarette packages, issuing for the first time a warning from the government about the health risks of secondhand tobacco smoke.
NEWS
April 28, 1998 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first surgeon general's report to focus on the smoking habits of racial and ethnic groups shows that, while the overall use of tobacco is declining among adults, it has begun to rise among minority teenagers, creating a "time bomb" for minority populations. Surgeon General David Satcher presented the report Monday to President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore. Public health advocates said the study clearly shows why Congress should pass comprehensive legislation to curb teen smoking.
NEWS
June 23, 1995 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Showing not a trace of bitterness, Dr. Henry W. Foster Jr. said that--while his ordeal as President Clinton's surgeon general nominee ended in failure Thursday--it was an enriching and worthwhile experience because it enabled him to promote his lifelong campaign against teen-age pregnancy. "This has provided me a platform to get that message out.
NEWS
June 20, 1995 | Associated Press
Dr. Henry W. Foster Jr. won assurances from Bob Dole on Monday that his nomination as surgeon general will be brought before the full Senate. But the embattled nominee still faces a likely filibuster. Dole, the Senate majority leader and a contender for the GOP presidential nomination, said he and Foster had a "very frank discussion" for 30 to 40 minutes. Though he still opposes the nomination, "I told Dr. Foster we would try to work out some procedure on the Senate floor," Dole told the Senate.
NEWS
February 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
Dr. David Satcher, who rose from poverty to national prominence, was sworn in as surgeon general Friday, and he promised to give back to the nation that helped him. "I know the American dream does not end when it comes true," he said during the Oval Office ceremony. President Clinton said he expects Satcher to help explain the nation's complex health system, along with the stunning but sometimes confusing medical breakthroughs.
NEWS
February 11, 1998 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than three years, the nation once again has a "family doctor." The Senate on Tuesday confirmed Dr. David Satcher, 56, as surgeon general, overcoming an effort by a handful of conservatives to thwart President Clinton's choice for the job. The position has been vacant since 1994, when the flamboyant Dr. Joycelyn Elders was fired.
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