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Surgeon General U S

NEWS
May 10, 1988 | Associated Press
Ninety-nine senators asked Surgeon General C. Everett Koop on Monday to declare drunk driving a "national crisis," but Koop said he believed the problem was most effectively handled locally. At a news conference, Koop said that "we must be clear on one major point: When the American people, acting at the community and state levels, decide they want to get drunk drivers off our roads, that's when it will happen."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1991 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under a hot sun, in the middle of a neighborhood recently torn by violence and racial tension, the surgeon general of the United States on Tuesday brought a universal message to the parents of the Jordan Downs Housing Project in Watts: Immunize your children. "Our children are in harm's way," Dr. Antonia Novello told the crowd.
NEWS
June 26, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Does America need a national "family doctor"? With the bitter battle over surgeon general nominee Henry W. Foster Jr. ending in defeat for President Clinton, Republicans on Capitol Hill are expected to escalate their efforts to do away with the job entirely, stirring fierce debate over the role of the nation's top doctor. Has the job of surgeon general become so ideological, so political and so divisive that it has outlived and diminished its usefulness?
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Henry W. Foster Jr. saved the life of the mayor's infant son. He talked a scared and confused Joyce German out of an abortion. He ran a network of prenatal clinics that persuaded young, poor women to abandon their midwives. And he delivered babies. "Oh, the babies," recalled his nurse, Thelma Walker-Brown. "Lots of babies. Babies, babies, babies." He was just out of medical school when he came to Tuskegee. Young, ambitious, trained in modern medicine.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than two decades of delivering grim statistics about the dangers of cigarettes, the annual surgeon general's report on smoking released Tuesday brought some good news--it is never too late to quit. "Smoking cessation has major and immediate health benefits for men and women of all ages," Surgeon General Antonia C. Novello said at a press conference.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2007 | Washington Post
A surgeon general's report in 2006 that called on Americans to help tackle global health problems has been kept from the public by a Bush political appointee without any background or expertise in medicine or public health, chiefly because the report did not promote the administration's policy accomplishments, according to current and former public health officials. The report described the link between poverty and poor health, urged the U.S.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surgeon General-designate Dr. Antonia C. Novello pledged Friday to be as outspoken as her predecessor in such public health areas as smoking and AIDS and said she will pay special attention to the health problems of women, children and minorities. Novello, a native of Puerto Rico, would be both the first woman and the first Latino to hold the post, if she is confirmed. "I will . . .
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton completed his final Cabinet selections Wednesday night and prepared to announce them today--choosing Zoe Baird, the general counsel of Aetna Life & Casualty Co., as the nation's first female attorney general and tapping Mickey Kantor, his campaign chairman and a prominent Los Angeles lawyer, as U.S. trade representative, transition officials said.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson, releasing a surgeon general's report describing the grim toll that smoking has taken on women, said Tuesday that he personally favors giving the Food and Drug Administration regulatory authority over cigarettes. The Bush administration has not taken a position on the issue--and it even chided Thompson just weeks ago for speaking out on it before the president does.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embattled surgeon general nominee Henry Foster Jr. on Wednesday night acknowledged having performed more than three times the number of abortions he had estimated last week, but he insisted that "I abhor abortion" and asked to be judged on his full public health career.
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