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Surplus Land

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1986 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
Officially, it is "surplus" land--291 acres near Lake Hodges that the City of San Diego owns but doesn't need. Purchased more than 30 years ago for a reservoir project that never happened, the land for years drew only limited attention from would-be buyers. Then, shopping center magnate Ernest Hahn built his North County Fair regional shopping center nearby. That was enough to give new meaning to the 291 acres flanking the shopping center on the east and the west.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2008 | David Zahniser, Zahniser is a Times staff writer.
The Los Angeles Unified School District is looking to develop low-cost apartments on as many as 12 campuses in an effort to help teachers find less expensive housing and live closer to their jobs. District officials have begun asking real estate developers to submit housing proposals on school campuses in Hollywood and Harbor Gateway and are reviewing other campuses where apartments could be built on surplus land.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1998 | JULIO V. CANO
For the first time in more than seven years, the city will auction off surplus property. Zoned for residential use only, the parcels are either remnants of a development or land left over from street widening projects. The largest parcel, at Alabama Street and Nashville Avenue, contains four lots and will require a minimum bid of $400,000. Two parcels at 602 and 620 Yorktown Ave. will each require minimum bids of $100,000, and a parcel at 2501 N. England St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2006 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
After a months-long delay, San Bernardino County officials on Tuesday released the complete findings of two investigations that offered an unsparing, behind-the-scenes look at questionable deal-making in a county still recovering from a mid-1990s corruption scandal. The reports focused on the county's $31-million purchase of a private jail and the sale of surplus county land involving a county supervisor's chief of staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1996 | KIMBERLY BROWER
Rejecting a recommendation from the Parks, Beach and Recreation Commission, the City Council this week voted against purchasing a parcel of land from the Newport-Mesa Unified School District. The commission had recommended buying the 48,000-square-foot property at 1601 E. 16th St. as the site for a gymnasium to meet the heavy demand for indoor recreation activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a price tag of nearly $1 million to clear brush from city-owned properties, a Los Angeles City Council panel recommended Monday studying the sale of surplus land to reduce future bills. About 1,200 of the city's 8,000 properties are in the Mountain Fire District and about 200 remain to be cleared, many of them in the Santa Monica Mountains, with the total cost approaching $1 million, said Assistant Fire Chief Al Hernandez. "Do we need to own all of these properties?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1995 | HOLLY J. WAGNER
The City Council has approved the sale of five acres of city-owned land just north of the Civic Center complex. Saddleback Land Development Co. will pay $2.1 million for the property, which the city bought in 1975 for $425,000. It is now leased to a strawberry farmer. Although a dozen information packages were sent to developers and consultants and 10 more to others who requested them, the city received only three bids. Saddleback's was by far the best offer. The second-highest offer was $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1994 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homeless advocates say they will seek federal permission to convert a U. S. Navy laboratory at the mouth of Port Hueneme Harbor into a one-stop clearinghouse providing housing and a variety of social services to Ventura County's homeless. Advocates say the need for such a center will increase its chances of becoming reality, even though it is proposed for an oceanfront strip of surplus Navy land targeted for port expansion and other economic development efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a heated debate about the need for affordable homes, the Los Angeles City Council on Friday decided to turn over surplus Navy housing in the San Pedro area to a host of new tenants, including a Catholic college and an expensive private school in Rolling Hills. The council, in an 8-4 vote, approved a controversial plan to establish civilian uses for a parcel of 545 homes that once housed military personnel assigned to the now-closed Long Beach Naval Shipyard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1993
Ventura Results from school board votes Tuesday: Surplus Land Should three properties, including two closed schools, be designated surplus land for sale to raise money to consolidate two district offices? Result: Approved 5 to 0 The Vote Terence Kilbride: Yes May Lee Berry: Yes Diane Harriman: Yes John Walker: Yes Jim Wells: Yes
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2006 | Ashley Powers and Michelle Keller, Times Staff Writers
Stung by a land deal investigation that ended the county career of one supervisor's top aide, San Bernardino County supervisors Tuesday banned all county employees from buying surplus county land. The board also barred employees from bidding on county property, such as items at sheriff's auctions, and approved fining top officials up to $100 if they're late filing financial disclosure documents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a price tag of nearly $1 million to clear brush from city-owned properties, a Los Angeles City Council panel recommended Monday studying the sale of surplus land to reduce future bills. About 1,200 of the city's 8,000 properties are in the Mountain Fire District and about 200 remain to be cleared, many of them in the Santa Monica Mountains, with the total cost approaching $1 million, said Assistant Fire Chief Al Hernandez. "Do we need to own all of these properties?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a heated debate about the need for affordable homes, the Los Angeles City Council on Friday decided to turn over surplus Navy housing in the San Pedro area to a host of new tenants, including a Catholic college and an expensive private school in Rolling Hills. The council, in an 8-4 vote, approved a controversial plan to establish civilian uses for a parcel of 545 homes that once housed military personnel assigned to the now-closed Long Beach Naval Shipyard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1998 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Los Angeles housing tracts declared surplus military property in 1997 have touched off a fierce debate over their future, pitting neighbor against neighbor in a battle over competing public policy goals. The Navy families who lived in these Harbor City and San Pedro neighborhoods moved out nearly two years ago, after the closing of the Long Beach Naval Shipyard. They left behind 545 middle-class homes, sitting on wide, curving streets near Los Angeles Harbor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1998
Faced with $4 billion in debt, the Department of Water and Power plans to sell off hundreds of acres of surplus land across Los Angeles. How those sales play out for the San Fernando Valley depends on how carefully DWP officials evaluate the parcels and on how aggressively they market them to appropriate buyers. The potential for huge benefits to the Valley is great as unused industrial land gets recycled as sites for new offices and factories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The For Sale signs haven't gone up yet, but at the Department of Water and Power the calls come almost daily. Hotels, golf courses, studios, parking lots--the list of proposals for surplus DWP land keeps getting longer. In coming weeks, the agency will hire a real estate company to handle its planned sell-off of surplus land holdings in the Los Angeles area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1989 | BILL BILLITER
The board of trustees for the Huntington Beach Union High School District is considering proposals from four developers to lease surplus land at Warner Avenue and Golden West Street for combined commercial and residential uses. Assistant Supt. David Hagen said the school board will probably decide in January which developer will be awarded a 55-year lease for the 14 acres. The surplus land is behind Ocean View High School, but its lease will not adversely affect the high school, Hagen said.
NEWS
October 10, 1986
Legislation barring the Veterans Administration from selling surplus land in Westwood and the Sepulveda district of the San Fernando Valley for two years was approved by the U.S. Senate. The measure goes to President Reagan as part of a package that Administration sources said may be vetoed because of Gramm-Rudman spending limits. "Hopefully, with the continued efforts of the community, we will eventually be able to prohibit sale of this land," said Rep. Anthony C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1998 | JULIO V. CANO
For the first time in more than seven years, the city will auction off surplus property. Zoned for residential use only, the parcels are either remnants of a development or land left over from street widening projects. The largest parcel, at Alabama Street and Nashville Avenue, contains four lots and will require a minimum bid of $400,000. Two parcels at 602 and 620 Yorktown Ave. will each require minimum bids of $100,000, and a parcel at 2501 N. England St.
NEWS
December 1, 1997 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to parlay an unused piece of land into a $2-million payoff, the Moorpark Unified School District is stepping into the dicey world of real estate development. In a venture that California school officials say is "pushing the envelope" in its ambition, the Ventura County district and Braemar Homes of Agoura Hills plan to take a proposal to build 150 houses on 15 district-owned acres to the Moorpark City Council in the next month or so.
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