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Surplus Property

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
Despite opposition from residents near the former Crest View School, the City Council voted this week to encourage commercial development on surplus school sites and other large vacant parcels. The Ocean View School District has proposed developing the Crest View site at Talbert Avenue and Beach Boulevard with a retail project that would bring in tax revenue for the city and lease income to the school district to pay for improvements at campuses still open.
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BUSINESS
March 20, 2011 | By Lew Sichelman
With apologies to Donald Trump fans, Uncle Sam is far and away the country's largest real estate mogul, with something like 1.2 million individual properties worth hundreds of billions of dollars. But if the Obama administration has its way, some of them will soon find their way into private hands. The White House has identified 14,000 properties it wants to get rid of, including "a couple of thousand" on foreign soil. And that's only a portion of the nearly 45,500 buildings identified by the Government Accountability Office that are either underutilized or unused and also could be sold.
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REAL ESTATE
February 23, 1992
Seven parcels totaling 8.65 acres of unimproved land in Waimanalo, Hawaii, will be sold by the U.S. General Services Administration this spring. Other government surplus property is also up for sale in other states, offering a variety of choices, including 43 properties in the Miami area, a residential subdivision in Broken Arrow, Okla., and a three-bedroom home in Providence, R.I. Surplus properties are sold competitively by sealed bid or public auction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt
The Crystal Cathedral, the Garden Grove megachurch, is laying off 50 workers, selling surplus property and may pull its "Hour of Power" television show in up to eight markets because of a precipitous drop in contributions. The 7,000-member church also has canceled its "Glory of Easter" pageant, a popular reenactment of the life and death of Jesus Christ, which sold tens of thousands of tickets each year. "This cuts to the heart of our ministry," said spokesman John Charles. "It is sad news."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1999 | FRED ALVAREZ
Looking for some used military clothing or some of that hard-to-find Navy-issue furniture? The Port Hueneme naval base has a deal for you. The Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office will conduct a sealed auction April 26 for surplus property ranging from tools to photographic equipment. Bids must be submitted no later than 9 a.m. the day of the auction. Successful bidders will be notified by mail. Property must be paid for and removed by May 6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1993 | JON NALICK
The Westminster School District board has declared Midway City and Gill elementary schools as surplus property, paving the way for their eventual lease or sale. Supt. Gail Wickstrom recommended the action, saying the estimated $3 million from disposing of the properties could help pay for the repair of the district's other schools. "I don't do this without great hesitation," Wickstrom told the board Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1993 | BERT ELJERA
The Tustin Unified School District board, despite opposition from parents, has declared two school sites and the district offices surplus properties that may be sold or leased. The board declared in a unanimous vote on Monday that Red Hill, which has been closed as an elementary school for the past 11 years, is no longer needed. By a 4-1 vote, Guin Foss, closed as an elementary school since 1978, was also declared surplus. Jane Bauer cast the dissenting vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1994
The Los Angeles City Council will join lobbying efforts to amend a federal law that gives homeless groups the first right to surplus government property. The City Council voted 12 to 0 Tuesday to direct its lobbyists in Washington to start work on proposed changes that would give local communities a voice in decisions made under the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act of 1987.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD
In its third attempt to raise money through the sale of assets, Orange County will place 16 surplus government properties on the block this spring, including several homes and vacant lots. The auction is expected to take place in late March and might be held in Newport Beach, officials said. Among the properties up for sale are the Orange County Housing Authority building on Broadway in Santa Ana, a harbor club in Newport Beach, and 30 acres of open space in Orange.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1995
Caltrans will sell 54 Pasadena and South Pasadena homes that once were in the path of the proposed Long Beach Freeway extension. The decision by Director James van Loben Sels comes in the wake of a Times report in April that Caltrans owns 110 excess properties in both cities worth $27 million, even though state law requires that the agency sell surplus property. Caltrans officials are looking at other properties to see if those should be sold as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2010 | By Tony Barboza and Kimi Yoshino
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's plans to help California's financial crisis by selling state-owned landmarks got off to a bumpy start Thursday when an auction to sell the Orange County Fairground drew a winning bid far below the estimated value of the property. Hailed by the governor as a "new way of thinking" about generating revenues, the auction ended up raising serious doubts about the viability of selling other properties, including the L.A. Coliseum, the Del Mar racetrack and San Quentin State Prison.
NEWS
October 31, 2004
Summary: One of two propositions concerning the primary system, this measure would preserve California's current system. It would amend the state Constitution to add a guarantee that the top vote-getter in each party in a primary would advance to the general election. As originally drafted by the Legislature, Proposition 60 included language that would have required the state to use money from the sale of surplus property to help pay off bonds. A court split the surplus property provisions into a separate measure, Proposition 60A, because initiatives are required to treat only a single subject.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2003 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
The city of Los Angeles has failed to effectively manage its vast real estate holdings and spends millions of dollars on private leases even as surplus properties sit empty, according to an audit released Wednesday by the city controller. City officials do not have a central database of all city-owned property, which was last valued in 1995 at $3 billion, and do not plan ahead to avoid costly leases, Controller Laura Chick concluded.
NEWS
August 22, 2001 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
President Bush moved Tuesday to preemptively shape the looming debate over the dwindling federal budget surplus, arguing that it is excessive spending, not his tax cut, that has created the greatest risk of future deficits. Sharpening the argument that is likely to dominate Washington this fall, Bush defended his tax cut as a tonic for the flagging economy and charged that new government spending poses the greatest threat to both economic recovery and the federal budget.
NEWS
October 21, 2000 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government is amassing budget surpluses and wiping out debt at such a ferocious pace that it could soon exhaust the usual places to park extra cash and face a politically explosive decision: whether to invest some of it in corporate stocks and bonds. Unlike a family, which can use a windfall to pay off credit cards or retire a mortgage, Washington cannot repay all its debt whenever it pleases. The Treasury Department can't order people to turn in their bonds before they are due.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2000 | Associated Press
With the nation awash in sugar, the government is preparing to give some of the surplus to farmers who pledge to destroy some of this fall's crop. Officials at the U.S. Department of Agriculture said that's the most feasible way to prop up domestic sugar prices at the least cost to taxpayers, although a final decision has not yet been made. Critics derided the idea as a desperate attempt to bail out growers, who are partly to blame for the surplus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1998 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of two local auction companies has filed a lawsuit against Orange County seeking nearly $10 million in damages. Norman Haigh, who owns Auctions Plus in Garden Grove and Auction Services in El Toro, claims the county breached written agreements it had with him as a contractor to liquidate government surplus property and automobiles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2003 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
The city of Los Angeles has failed to effectively manage its vast real estate holdings and spends millions of dollars on private leases even as surplus properties sit empty, according to an audit released Wednesday by the city controller. City officials do not have a central database of all city-owned property, which was last valued in 1995 at $3 billion, and do not plan ahead to avoid costly leases, Controller Laura Chick concluded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1999 | ALECIA FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Santa Clarita Valley Community College District board Wednesday awarded two bids to lease surplus college land for private development, a move expected to generate more than $75 million over the next 60 years. The lease agreements will allow two developers to turn 14 acres on College of the Canyons property at Valencia Boulevard and Rockwell Canyon Road into a hotel and office site. "This is a really good deal for the college," trustee Bruce Fortine said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999 | DIANE WEDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Amid the medical journals, patient files and orthopedics hardware cluttering Dr. Terry Mendelson's Kaiser Permanente Medical Center office sits an array of baskets brimming with syringes, scissors and industrial-strength surgical supplies. "Excuse the mess," the 45-year-old Panorama City orthopedist said as he gingerly stepped around the medical supplies that were strewn around the office like discarded Tinker Toys. "This stuff pops up everywhere."
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