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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Jerome Oxman, who started a mail-order business in the early 1960s that grew into a sprawling Santa Fe Springs outlet that became both a military surplus store and a military museum, has died. He was 97. Oxman died of prostate cancer Feb. 22 at his Buena Park home, said his son, Brian. Oxman was an expert at buying items at government auctions, and his love for surplus military gear was honed by three years of World War II duty on a U.S. Army supply line in Iran. He worked at a Vernon surplus store before starting Oxman's Surplus Inc. at Rosecrans and Valley View avenues in 1961.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Jerome Oxman, who started a mail-order business in the early 1960s that grew into a sprawling Santa Fe Springs outlet that became both a military surplus store and a military museum, has died. He was 97. Oxman died of prostate cancer Feb. 22 at his Buena Park home, said his son, Brian. Oxman was an expert at buying items at government auctions, and his love for surplus military gear was honed by three years of World War II duty on a U.S. Army supply line in Iran. He worked at a Vernon surplus store before starting Oxman's Surplus Inc. at Rosecrans and Valley View avenues in 1961.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
For years, one of the most top-secret weapons of World War II sat in a corner of Jerome Oxman's shop, past the stacks of neatly folded fatigues, the rows of olive-drab canteens and a display of combat boots. The Norden bombsight, a gyroscopically controlled telescope and computer that allowed the U.S. Army Air Forces to zero in on Axis ground targets, was as expensive as it was sophisticated: Each device cost about $122,400 in today's dollars. Oxman bought his for $9.80. He picked it up when his employer, a Vernon surplus store, sent him to collect a load of government gear in 1950.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2013 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
In another life, William Fulton was "Drop Zone Bill," a bounty hunter who ran a military surplus store in Anchorage. You need a tactical vest? A bayonet that would clip neatly onto an M-4? Bill Fulton was your man. "We do bad things to bad people," his company jackets said. Fulton was also a go-to guy for Republican politicians who occasionally needed to reach out to the far right fringes of the party - those who spent weekends in the woods in camo gear and considered the 2nd Amendment an expression of divine intent.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2013 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
In another life, William Fulton was "Drop Zone Bill," a bounty hunter who ran a military surplus store in Anchorage. You need a tactical vest? A bayonet that would clip neatly onto an M-4? Bill Fulton was your man. "We do bad things to bad people," his company jackets said. Fulton was also a go-to guy for Republican politicians who occasionally needed to reach out to the far right fringes of the party - those who spent weekends in the woods in camo gear and considered the 2nd Amendment an expression of divine intent.
NEWS
August 25, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
A Santa Ana man who authorities said broke into a surplus store Tuesday was shot and wounded by police. Eric Sprague, 30, who may have once worked at the Surplus Warehouse, was armed with a spear gun and crossbow, said police Sgt. Carlos Rojas. He also was seen drinking cleaning solvent and briefly setting himself on fire in the store. When Sprague left about 2 a.m. with the crossbow, Rojas said, officers fired and hit him several times. Sprague was hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1988
A two-alarm fire early Tuesday gutted a Bellflower army surplus store and caused minor injuries to two firefighters, officials said. A preliminary investigation indicated that the fire, which destroyed the Doughboy Surplus store near the corner of Artesia and Bellflower boulevards, was deliberately set, said Los Angeles County Fire Department spokeswoman Diane L. Castro. Firefighters were alerted to the blaze about 1:15 a.m.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1991 | GREG JOHNSON
The likelihood of hostilities in the Middle East is prompting brisk sales of gas masks, sleeping bags, desert camouflage clothing and canteens at military surplus stores in San Diego. The sales are split between military reservists who are heading overseas and civilians who fear an outbreak of terrorism in the U.S., store managers said Monday. "Gas mask sales are ridiculous," said Debbie Jordon, manager of GI Joe's Army & Navy Surplus store in downtown San Diego.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore launched his effort to reinvent government in 1993 with a ringing call to action, telling senior bureaucrats and political appointees on the south lawn of the White House: "Abandon the obsolete. Eliminate duplication. End special privileges." Prodded by Gore's words, the Pentagon laid out an ambitious plan to privatize many noncombat operations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1993 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most days during the past 20 years, Bernard and Lea Graf opened and closed the Army-Navy store they owned in Reseda like clockwork. It may have been those precisely regular habits, police said Friday, that led to their undoing. After they had closed their shop--Army-Navy Surplus Headquarters--Thursday about 7 p.m., as they did every weekday evening, he turned off the lights and she set the alarm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
For years, one of the most top-secret weapons of World War II sat in a corner of Jerome Oxman's shop, past the stacks of neatly folded fatigues, the rows of olive-drab canteens and a display of combat boots. The Norden bombsight, a gyroscopically controlled telescope and computer that allowed the U.S. Army Air Forces to zero in on Axis ground targets, was as expensive as it was sophisticated: Each device cost about $122,400 in today's dollars. Oxman bought his for $9.80. He picked it up when his employer, a Vernon surplus store, sent him to collect a load of government gear in 1950.
NEWS
November 29, 2005 | JOE ROBINSON
LOVINGLY DISPLAYED behind a plastic window in a back corner of San Pedro's Union War Surplus, the French Officer's Kitchen was a stopper. I had never seen, thought about or desired one -- and at a couple of dozen pieces, the combo would be tough for backpacking without a wheelbarrow -- but still I stood transfixed, as if peering into a Foreign Legion lunch tent.
NEWS
August 25, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
A Santa Ana man who authorities said broke into a surplus store Tuesday was shot and wounded by police. Eric Sprague, 30, who may have once worked at the Surplus Warehouse, was armed with a spear gun and crossbow, said police Sgt. Carlos Rojas. He also was seen drinking cleaning solvent and briefly setting himself on fire in the store. When Sprague left about 2 a.m. with the crossbow, Rojas said, officers fired and hit him several times. Sprague was hospitalized with non-life-threatening injuries.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore launched his effort to reinvent government in 1993 with a ringing call to action, telling senior bureaucrats and political appointees on the south lawn of the White House: "Abandon the obsolete. Eliminate duplication. End special privileges." Prodded by Gore's words, the Pentagon laid out an ambitious plan to privatize many noncombat operations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1993 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most days during the past 20 years, Bernard and Lea Graf opened and closed the Army-Navy store they owned in Reseda like clockwork. It may have been those precisely regular habits, police said Friday, that led to their undoing. After they had closed their shop--Army-Navy Surplus Headquarters--Thursday about 7 p.m., as they did every weekday evening, he turned off the lights and she set the alarm.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | GERI COOK, Geri Cook's Bargains column runs every Friday in Valley Life
If the CD you were hoping for didn't appear under your Christmas tree and your budget is blitzed, a trip to Record Surplus may fill the bill. The inventory at any of the Record Surplus stores consists of new and used CDs and LPs from private collections, customer trades, manufacturers close-outs and overruns from various labels. Deeply discounted CDs and a vast selection of LPs draw bargain hunters and collectors from all over Southern California.
NEWS
November 29, 2005 | JOE ROBINSON
LOVINGLY DISPLAYED behind a plastic window in a back corner of San Pedro's Union War Surplus, the French Officer's Kitchen was a stopper. I had never seen, thought about or desired one -- and at a couple of dozen pieces, the combo would be tough for backpacking without a wheelbarrow -- but still I stood transfixed, as if peering into a Foreign Legion lunch tent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1990 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deployment of American soldiers in Saudi Arabia has spawned a new fashion trend on the home front: civilians sporting military fatigues in desert camouflage patterns. Owners of surplus stores in the San Fernando Valley said Monday that they have had a hard time keeping desert camouflage jackets and pants in stock since the U.S. troop buildup began in the Middle East. "It's become a fad. . . . People sort of feel pride in what's happening and they want to identify with it.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1991 | GREG JOHNSON
The likelihood of hostilities in the Middle East is prompting brisk sales of gas masks, sleeping bags, desert camouflage clothing and canteens at military surplus stores in San Diego. The sales are split between military reservists who are heading overseas and civilians who fear an outbreak of terrorism in the U.S., store managers said Monday. "Gas mask sales are ridiculous," said Debbie Jordon, manager of GI Joe's Army & Navy Surplus store in downtown San Diego.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1990 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deployment of American soldiers in Saudi Arabia has spawned a new fashion trend on the home front: civilians sporting military fatigues in desert camouflage patterns. Owners of surplus stores in the San Fernando Valley said Monday that they have had a hard time keeping desert camouflage jackets and pants in stock since the U.S. troop buildup began in the Middle East. "It's become a fad. . . . People sort of feel pride in what's happening and they want to identify with it.
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