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Surrealism

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2006 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
"Surreal" is one of those terms whose meaning has become obscured from overuse, dulling its edge and losing its original connection to a specific form of artistic practice.
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BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Vincent Bevins
RIO DE JANEIRO - Brazil's currency is called the real, which in Portuguese means both "royal" and, simply, "real. " But with prices skyrocketing ahead of the World Cup finals this summer, some locals in this famed beach city have created a mock currency they've dubbed the "surreal. " Adorned with the mustachioed face of Salvador Dali, the bills exist only as an Internet meme. Still, they have become the symbol of a digital protest movement. Fed-up Rio residents have taken to social media to share photos of price tags, receipts and menu items so pricey, it almost seems they could only have been dreamed up by the Spanish surrealist artist.
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BOOKS
July 18, 1993 | Christopher Merrill, Merrill has published several books of poetry, and is author of the forthcoming "The Grass of Another Country: Journey Through the World of Soccer" (Henry Holt)
How many Surrealists does it take to screw in a light bulb? The answer--a fish--is at once inoffensive and to the point: Andre Breton and his friends wanted to reinvent man's relationship to life itself, and what better place to begin than with a simple mechanical operation? Illumination was their theme, humor their favorite means and the only problem with this joke, they might have said, is that it is not offensive. After all, these were the French poets and artists who greeted the advent of World War II with the publication of an anthology of black humor.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
NEW YORK -  Los Angeles-based designer Scott Sternberg showed his Band of Outsiders women's collection Sunday afternoon during New York Fashion Week, in the raw space on Wooster Street in Soho that will be the location of the first Band of Outsiders boutique opening this summer. The look: Surrealism meets sportswear with lots of sweater knit dressing, fuzzy faux furs and painterly floral prints. The inspiration: Lee Miller, the famous '30s and '40s photojournalist and fashion model who was romantically involved with Man Ray and was his muse.
NEWS
May 15, 2001 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What could be more natural for an emigre writer than to find things in his adopted country strange to the point of surrealism? And what could be more natural, if the writer is Russian, to call on his native literature's rich traditions of the surrealistic, the comic and the piercingly sad? Zinovy Zinik, like most of the narrators of these five stories, is a Russian Jew who lives in London.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2003
Regarding Manohla Dargis' review of Luis Bunuel's work ("With a Passion That Still Has the Power to Shock," June 22), I would simply like to point out that Bunuel never "abandoned" surrealism. For Bunuel, surrealism was the healthiest form of artistic exploration developing out of Romanticism's reaction to the scientific materialism and exploitative commercialism that have come to dominate world culture. He found in surrealism a moral code that he applied to all of his work, allowing him to integrate the apparent contradictions of inner psychology and outer reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2011 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Is graffiti the most influential art movement since Pop burst on the scene in 1962? That's the head-turning claim made by "Art in the Streets," a controversial exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art. The show has been drawing the ire of social critics, alarmed by what they perceive as an institutional celebration of vandalism, all while drawing curious crowds (often young) to the museum's Little Tokyo warehouse space. Graffiti is identified as a global artistic phenomenon that is thriving 40 years after it first emerged as a cultural marker around 1971.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art continues to expand its Latin American holdings in a way both monumental and pertinent to the city. According to the museum's blog, Unframed, Roberto Matta's huge 1965-66 painting "Burn, Baby, Burn (L'escalade)" was acquired for the museum over the weekend by the Collectors Committee. The canvas is nearly 10 feet tall and 32 feet wide, which would likely make it the largest painting in LACMA's collection. The Chilean-born Matta (1911-2002) was famously expelled from the Surrealist movement in 1947 over a disagreement with Andre Breton.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin
Paris' Centre Pompidou, one of the world's leading contemporary and modern artmuseums, has for the first time joined forces with a public artmuseum in China. The exhibition “Electric Fields: Surrealism and Beyond - La Collection du Centre Pompidou” brings French art masterpieces to Shanghai, according to artdaily.org. It opened Sunday at the Power Station of Art, as part of the Shanghai Biennale. To realize the “Electric Fields” exhibition, Centre Pompidou sent 65 cases of video art, paintings, sculptures and manuscripts to Shanghai.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
Painter Gordon Onslow Ford will discuss the link between automatism and modern art in a lecture titled "Automatism and Spontaneity" at 8 tonight at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. Ford's lecture will be given in conjunction with the museum's exhibition of abstract surrealist and Expressionist drawings, "The Interpretive Link," today through Sept. 14. Ford is one of 22 artists featured in the exhibition.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
A frozen plume of water? A ghostly guppy? A dragon tear? Those are just a few of the things that may come to mind when you first lay eyes on the 2013 LACMA holiday ornament. An annual tradition that taps Los Angeles-based designers and artists to create ornaments inspired by the museum's holdings (much like the Wear LACMA program does with apparel and accessories), this year's was created by brothers Simon and Nikolai Haas whose downtown L.A. design studio cranks out a range of things -- from freaky looking furniture, candelabras and vases to set pieces and props for movies and television.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
The Kardashian Christmas card for 2013 is, in a word, weird. And that's weird relative to Kardashian Christmas cards from other years , which haven't exactly been fraught with holiday spirit. Weird in its surreal nature. Weird in its complete lack of Christmas sentiment, or sentiment of any other holiday, excepting perhaps a twisted, neon-filled New Year's Eve. Weird in that most of the guys in the family are missing, except for one boy child, Mason, and one man, Bruce Jenner, who's conveniently trapped in a narrow glass tube, desperately reaching for one of his Olympic medals.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
Lesley Vance makes the kind of small, abstract paintings that would be easy to dismiss if they weren't so solid, so alive. The large main space at David Kordansky has been divided to better suit the work's intimate dimensions - the largest is 26 inches wide, but most are closer to letter size. At this scale, Vance uses surprisingly large brushes, confidently creating swirls and swipes of striated color that weave in and around flatter, more solid masses. The paintings continually flirt with recognition, suggesting a body part here, a wisp of smoke there, but these references flit by as if animated and the works continue to elude apprehension.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
Will we never tire of revisiting the middle of the last century? Between “Mad Men” and the craze for Midcentury Modern everything, we seem to be gorging on nostalgia for the Atomic Age. Painter (and actor and comic) Martin Mull's work has long mined the darker side of this era, and his new exhibition at Samuel Freeman continues in that vein. His large black-and-white paintings and a suite of graphite drawings are often surreal mashups of commercial imagery and found photographs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Drew Barrymore isn't tight-lipped about her second pregnancy, and the actress has good reason not to be. "When I found out I was overjoyed. It always feels so surreal, it's incredible," the "Big Miracle" actress told People just after confirming that she and husband Will Kopelman were expecting their second child. "[I'm feeling] incredible, that 'Here we go again' feeling. And blessed. Blessed!" the 38-year-old said. "You're so lucky to get to do it. It's such a miracle . I just felt really lucky.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
This past weekend, Neill Blomkamp's sci-fi pic "Elysium" opened to $30.5 million . Though it won the weekend, it was an unremarkable number -- and that's what made it so remarkable. "Elysium" might have been expected to jump up a lot closer to $40 million. After all, its predecessor, 2009's "District 9," which was also an idea-laden piece of futurism from Blomkamp, took in $37.5 million on its opening weekend. Sure, critical assessments were stronger for the previous film.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2004 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
"Picasso to Pollock: Modern Masterpieces From the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art" is both more and less than its title suggests. More artists are included in the 59-work exhibition at the Orange County Museum of Art than the mainline Modernists who traveled the established path from Pablo Picasso's Cubism to Jackson Pollock's drips via Surrealism's psychological kinks. To be historically accurate, in chronological terms, the five-gallery show would have to be retitled. But "Maurice B.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2012 | By David Pagel
The five paintings in Scott Greenwalt's first solo show in Los Angeles take viewers back to the 1960s by way of the mind-blowing trips that acid made possible. But rather than inviting aging boomers to get all misty eyed about yesteryear, the San Francisco artist's peculiar pictures at Weekend function like flashbacks gone bad. The initial sense of familiarity they trigger in your lizard brain disintegrates as you slip past the point of no return into an absurd world unlike any you have ever visited - in body, mind or spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Laurence Olivier was among the world's most accomplished actors, but he wasn't a big enough star. That was the consensus of Paramount honchos in 1965, when director John Frankenheimer was planning his eighth feature, the science fiction thriller "Seconds," and wanted the esteemed Brit in the lead role. What might at first have seemed like executive-suite folly led to an inspired instance of counterintuitive casting: Rock Hudson, Hollywood's reigning romantic-comedy dreamboat, in what is unquestionably one of the darkest studio movies ever made.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2013 | By David Pagel
Optimism and nostalgia cross paths in Osvaldo Trujillo's pleasantly melancholic paintings at CB1 Gallery. Titled “Ancient Future,” the L.A. artist's exhibition of 11 intimately scaled oils on panel forges an alliance between less-is-more Modernism and everything-plus-the-kitchen-sink Realism to suggest that the soft side of Surrealism is alive and well and a whole lot more captivating than the aggressively sexualized shock tactics of its earlier...
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