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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1990
As expected, The Times still exhibits the Rostenkowski/Bentsen syndrome with its sour grapes editorial "On Surviving the Medicare Crunch" (Dec. 26). The catastrophic Medicare surtax law was the first time in history that a single segment of the population was to be required to pay a surtax for a much larger segment who paid nothing, including 2.8 million disabled, 1.2 million spouses of disabled and unknown quantities of AIDS patients. And it was a 15% surtax! If the average taxpayer were asked to pay even a 1% surtax for something, he would balk.
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BUSINESS
July 15, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON — When the Supreme Court upheld the healthcare reform law on federal tax grounds, it re-stoked a housing issue that had been relatively quiet for the last year: The alleged 3.8% "real estate tax" on home sales beginning in 2013 that is buried in the legislation. Immediately following enactment of the healthcare law, waves of emails hit the Internet with ominous messages aimed at homeowners. A sample: "Did you know that if you sell your house after 2012 you will pay a 3.8% sales tax on it?
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OPINION
April 30, 1989
The front-page article "Bentsen Seeks Cut in Medicare Surtax Placed on Elderly" (April 21) states that "Bentsen blamed 'misinformation' for much of the controversy over the surtax. He noted that the top premium $1,600 per year, would be paid by couples with incomes of $74,000 a year or more." I suggest that Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.) is dishing out misinformation. If I am correctly reading the IRS Form 1040 ES for 1989 instructions, couples over 65, who use the standard deductions, will pay the full $1,600 premium tax if their income exceeds $62,900 per year.
NATIONAL
October 5, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
Senate Democratic leaders are proposing a 5.6% surtax on annual incomes beyond $1 million as a way to pay for President Obama's jobs plan, making a populist appeal to attract support. The pivot Wednesday from the White House's initial approach is an acknowledgment that the $447-billion proposal to spur the economy doesn't have enough backing in Congress, even among Democrats. Republicans have pronounced the jobs plan dead. Obama had proposed his own millionaire's tax, the "Buffett rule," which would require millionaires to pay at least as high a tax rate as lower-income individuals.
NEWS
June 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Bush Administration is urging Congress to think twice before cutting taxes that will finance a catastrophic illness insurance program for millions of older Americans. Until the government can get a better estimate of how much the surtax will bring in and how much the catastrophic coverage will cost, "Treasury would not consider it prudent to alter the premium," Assistant Treasury Secretary John G. Wilkins told the Senate Finance Committee on Thursday. The panel and the House Ways and Means Committee are considering several bills to repeal or delay the surtax, which was enacted less than a year ago. Many older Americans say they do not need the coverage because they have private insurance.
NATIONAL
October 5, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
Senate Democratic leaders are proposing a 5.6% surtax on annual incomes beyond $1 million as a way to pay for President Obama's jobs plan, making a populist appeal to attract support. The pivot Wednesday from the White House's initial approach is an acknowledgment that the $447-billion proposal to spur the economy doesn't have enough backing in Congress, even among Democrats. Republicans have pronounced the jobs plan dead. Obama had proposed his own millionaire's tax, the "Buffett rule," which would require millionaires to pay at least as high a tax rate as lower-income individuals.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2009 | By Janet Hook and Christi Parsons
As President Obama is preparing to announce a troop increase and new strategy for the war in Afghanistan, several powerful House committee chairmen have proposed a surtax on Americans to pay the future military costs. Talk of the levy escalated Tuesday after Obama said he soon would deliver a plan to "finish the job" in Afghanistan. "I feel very confident that when the American people hear a clear rationale for what we're doing there and how we intend to achieve our goals," Obama said, "that they will be supportive."
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.) called Thursday for a substantial reduction in the controversial surtax that was enacted last year to pay for Medicare coverage of catastrophic health care costs. Bentsen said that the unpopular premium will produce a surplus of $4.2 billion over five years and estimated that it could be cut "by at least 16%." "It was never our intention that beneficiaries pay more than needed to operate this program in a prudent and responsible fashion," Bentsen told a news conference.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON — When the Supreme Court upheld the healthcare reform law on federal tax grounds, it re-stoked a housing issue that had been relatively quiet for the last year: The alleged 3.8% "real estate tax" on home sales beginning in 2013 that is buried in the legislation. Immediately following enactment of the healthcare law, waves of emails hit the Internet with ominous messages aimed at homeowners. A sample: "Did you know that if you sell your house after 2012 you will pay a 3.8% sales tax on it?
NATIONAL
November 25, 2009 | By Janet Hook and Christi Parsons
As President Obama is preparing to announce a troop increase and new strategy for the war in Afghanistan, several powerful House committee chairmen have proposed a surtax on Americans to pay the future military costs. Talk of the levy escalated Tuesday after Obama said he soon would deliver a plan to "finish the job" in Afghanistan. "I feel very confident that when the American people hear a clear rationale for what we're doing there and how we intend to achieve our goals," Obama said, "that they will be supportive."
OPINION
January 12, 2008
Re "MWD may cut water to area cities," Jan. 7 What about building desalinization plants paid for by a surtax on water use? Stanley Marcus Encino
NEWS
November 5, 1998 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Buoyed by a landslide election victory, California's gaming tribes wasted no time Wednesday demanding formal state recognition of their casinos--and opponents of Proposition 5 just as swiftly announced plans to challenge the legality of the high-profile gaming initiative. Meanwhile, Proposition 10--the 50-cents-a-pack cigarette surtax--remained too close to call Wednesday.
NEWS
July 22, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its most important decision since taking office last month, France's left-wing government announced Monday that it will slap new tax surcharges on big business to help plug a widening budget deficit and qualify for the single European currency next year. Under the $5.3-billion deficit-reduction package, government spending will also be cut by $1.7 billion, including the reduction of $330 million in credits earmarked for the Ministry of Defense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1997
Your March 27 editorial in favor of extending the 3.75% business surtax (Prop. 7) implies that the city tax is quite low, at $1 to $6 per $1,000 gross receipts. In fact, there is a minimum tax for each category that severely penalizes the small business owner. Oh yes, and there is a separate tax on each category of business in which one engages, and each has its own minimums. The person who makes $5,000 from his or her home office, doing computer hardware consulting, has to pay the same amount, about $110, as does the person who makes $18,000 doing the same job. If our hypothetical consultant wants to resell hardware as part of his consulting job, he must pay a retail business tax, which has a minimum of about $115.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1997
Proposition 7 on the Los Angeles city ballot asks voters to extend a 3.75% business surtax that produces $10 million a year for police, fire and other city services. The surtax was originally imposed at 7.5% in the mid-1980s, amid a decline in business tax receipts. It was halved in 1994 and extended most recently by the City Council in June 1995. As the city's economy continues to strengthen, the surcharge might become unnecessary, but that time has not arrived yet. We recommend a yes vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1996
Retail gasoline prices in California are starting to drift down from their recent peak because refinery output has caught up with demand. The wholesale price paid by dealers began to drop at the end of April, and pump prices, while they vary from area to area, are beginning to reflect the lower costs. How fast or how far prices will fall remains to be seen. In the volatile oil business, prices almost always go up faster than they come down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1995
Re: "No Fallback Plan if Tax Vote Fails" (April 18): While pushing for a sales tax increase as the only solution to the county's financial crisis, (county CEO) William Popejoy is quoted as saying, "Right now it would be intellectually dishonest to say that we have viable options." This distorts the truth. Genuine honesty demands the admission that he and county supervisors have never seriously considered anything but a sales tax. If Potentate Pojo and his cabal of cerebral wizards were ever concerned with enhancing their intellect, they might have considered viable options such as these: a special tax assessment on commercial, industrial, and agricultural property; a surtax on the receipts of entertainment parks and facilities; a surtax on incomes over $100,000; a luxury surtax on ostentatious purchases such as jewelry, furs, yachts, etc. These proposals are offered merely to suggest how the burden of responsibility for Orange County's bankruptcy might more justly be applied.
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