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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
A submarine-hunting surveillance ship will be christened today in Washington state, the Navy announced Tuesday. The ceremonies for the surveillance ship Bold will be at the Tacoma Boatbuilding shipyards in Tacoma, with Sen. Slade Gorton (R-Wash.) making the main speech.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Angel Jennings, Richard Winton and James Rainey
After learning this week of a nine-day aerial surveillance program conducted in 2012, Compton Mayor Aja Brown proposed a policy that would require authorities to notify the public before installing monitoring equipment. “There is nothing worse than believing you are being observed by a third party unnecessarily,” Compton Mayor Aja Brown said Wednesday. “We want to assure the peace of mind of our citizens.” The proposal for the so-called “citizen privacy protection policy” came amid public outrage among Compton residents who were never notified of the pilot surveillance program and said it amounted to an invasion of privacy.  For nine days in early 2012, a small Cessna plane recorded low-resolution images of every corner of the 10.1-square-mile city and beamed them to the local Sheriff's Department station, where deputies observed incidents including fender benders, a string of necklace snatchings and a shooting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2009 | Robert Abele
Her debut provocation, 1993's "Boxing Helena," revealed the limits of artistic heredity, and now director Jennifer Lynch -- daughter of David -- has returned with the prankish, ultra-violent hell ride "Surveillance." But, again, her quest to unnerve feels forced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Angel Jennings, Richard Winton and James Rainey
To the 96,000 residents of Compton, the little Cessna would have looked like scores of other small planes that flew over the city each day. But anyone paying close attention might have noticed the single-engine craft kept circling the city in a continuous loop. What they could not have known was that it packed unusual cargo - a bank of a dozen wide-angle industrial imaging cameras. They recorded low-resolution images of every corner of the 10.1-square-mile city. For nine days in early 2012, the small plane beamed the images to the local Sheriff's Department station, where deputies observed fender benders, necklace snatchings and a shooting.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
On the occasion of the Getty's acquisition of Lewis Baltz's archive, Luisotti has mounted an installation of the photographer's 36-foot-long mural, “Ronde de Nuit” (1991-92). Titled after Rembrandt's “The Night Watch,” it, too, is a meditation on civic guardianship, but of a distinctly contemporary, insidious order, the sort of protection that delivers an equal dose of vulnerability. Baltz gleaned many of the 12 color photographs in this filmic montage from police surveillance footage made in a suburb of Lille, France: figures ascending an escalator; a man standing in what might be a line in what might be a bank; the distant facade of a high-rise.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien
Critics offered cautious praise Friday following President Obama's hourlong press conference to unveil proposed changes and responses to a much-criticized government surveillance program. But they also made it clear that more needed to be done to reform a system that has generated widespread controversy in recent weeks. This week, Obama held two meetings with technology executives, privacy advocates and industry trade groups to discuss issues raised by leaks from former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden.
SCIENCE
June 20, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times / For the Science Now blog
Say cheese: Engineers have created a new camera with the capability of capturing over a gigapixel of data, a resolution that is significantly better than normal human vision. Pixels represent individual points of data in an image, so the more pixels in a single image, the more details can be resolved within that image. The average retail camera currently captures only about 8 to 10 megapixels. The resolution of the gigapixel camera is at least 100 times better than that, and the researchers say their design may eventually be able to capture 50 gigapixels at once.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said Tuesday that an airborne video-surveillance program that was tested in 2012 was deemed not useful for the agency's crime-fighting needs. Under the nine-day trial program in January 2012, a video camera was mounted on a small plane that was deployed for six-hour periods during the day, the department said. The plane, which flew out of Long Beach Airport, was operated by a private company that provides airborne surveillance technology.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Video surveillance, a market that was already on an upward trajectory, is expected to receive a big boost in spending following the bombings in Boston. The market for video surveillance equipment was already forecast to grow to $20.5 billion in revenue in 2016, up 114% from 2010's revenue of $9.6 billion, according to IHS , an insights and analytics company. But now, IHS says it is recalculating its forecast after the Boston Marathon bombings. IHS says high-profile terrorist attacks historically have driven governments to increase spending on video surveillance equipment, and the same is expected following the Boston bombings, in which surveillance cameras played a key role in the investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Richard Winton
Los Angeles County sheriff's officials said Wednesday there were no "Big Brother" aspects to an airborne video-surveillance program over Compton that was tested in 2012. Under the nine-day trial program in January 2012, a video camera was mounted on a small plane that was deployed for six-hour periods during the day, the department said. The plane, which flew out of Long Beach Airport, was operated by a private company that provides airborne surveillance technology. Nicole Nishida, a sheriff's spokeswoman, said the program was limited in scope and the department did not see a need to announce it because the city already used ground surveillance cameras in any areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By A Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department acknowledged this week that Compton residents were not notified of an airborne video-surveillance program that was tested in 2012. "No notification to the residents was made because this system was being tested in a city where cameras were already deployed and the system was only being evaluated," the department said in a statement released Tuesday. Officials said the department decided the program was not useful and dropped it after the test period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Richard Winton
Los Angeles County sheriff's officials said Wednesday there were no "Big Brother" aspects to an airborne video-surveillance program over Compton that was tested in 2012. Under the nine-day trial program in January 2012, a video camera was mounted on a small plane that was deployed for six-hour periods during the day, the department said. The plane, which flew out of Long Beach Airport, was operated by a private company that provides airborne surveillance technology. Nicole Nishida, a sheriff's spokeswoman, said the program was limited in scope and the department did not see a need to announce it because the city already used ground surveillance cameras in any areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said Tuesday that an airborne video-surveillance program that was tested in 2012 was deemed not useful for the agency's crime-fighting needs. Under the nine-day trial program in January 2012, a video camera was mounted on a small plane that was deployed for six-hour periods during the day, the department said. The plane, which flew out of Long Beach Airport, was operated by a private company that provides airborne surveillance technology.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | Ken Dilanian
When federal prosecutors charged Colorado resident Jamshid Muhtorov in 2012 with providing support to a terrorist organization in his native Uzbekistan, court records suggested the FBI had secretly tapped his phones and read his emails. But it wasn't just the FBI. The Justice Department acknowledged in October that the National Security Agency had gathered evidence against Muhtorov under a 2008 law that authorizes foreign intelligence surveillance without warrants, much of it on the Internet.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2014 | By David Horsey
California Sen. Dianne Feinstein's accusation that the CIA has illegally spied on Congress has caused everyone from South Carolina's hawkish Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham to on-the-run whistle-blower Edward Snowden to weigh in. Feinstein, a Democrat, chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee. She claims there is evidence that the CIA conducted surveillance on committee staffers who were looking through classified documents related to the spy agency's interrogation and detention practices during the administration of President George W. Bush.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Fugitive secrets-leaker Edward Snowden made a rare video appearance Monday at the South by Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin, Texas, condemning mass government surveillance and urging members of the tech-savvy audience to take action against it. Speaking from Russia, where he was granted asylum, the former National Security Agency contractor said "absolutely, yes" he would leak secret government information again. Snowden has been charged with espionage for releasing a trove of intelligence-gathering secrets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2013 | By Jason Wells
Los Angeles police have released video surveillance footage of the assailant believed to have stabbed a 35-year-old man to death Friday in South Los Angeles, just a block from his home. The footage shows William Jennings, 35, walking on the sidewalk in the 3300 block of West Jefferson Boulevard around 10:25 p.m., when he appears to be confronted by the assailant. A brief dispute ensues, during which, the assailant takes out a knife and repeatedly stabs Jennings to death. The assailant then walks off, leaving Jennings on the ground.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - No one can sue the government over secret surveillance because, since it's secret, no one can prove his or her calls were intercepted, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday, throwing out a constitutional challenge to the government's monitoring of international calls and emails. The 5-4 decision is the latest of many that have shielded the government's anti-terrorism programs from court challenge, and a striking example of what civil libertarians call the Catch-22 rule that blocks challengers from collecting the evidence they need to proceed.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | By Maija Palmer
There is a sense of despair when it comes to privacy in the digital age. Many of us assume that so much of our electronic information is now compromised, whether by corporations or government agencies, that there is little that can be done about it. Sometimes we try to rationalize this by telling ourselves that privacy may no longer matter so much. After all, an upstanding citizen should have nothing to fear from surveillance. In "Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance," author Julia Angwin seeks to challenge that defeatism.
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