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Surveillance Satellites

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NEWS
August 5, 1993 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The spectacular midair fireball that consumed a Titan IV rocket off the Santa Barbara coast this week may have incinerated a trio of secret ocean surveillance satellites designed to monitor Russian surface fleets and nuclear submarines, civilian and congressional space experts said Wednesday. Pentagon officials still refuse to publicly discuss the secret mission or the cost of Monday's accident. But a growing consensus of the civilian analysts who monitor the classified U.S.
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NEWS
August 25, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A retired Air Force master sergeant working for a government contractor was charged Friday with conspiring to commit espionage in connection with the theft of classified data from a super-secret federal agency that designs and operates the nation's spy satellites. Brian P. Regan, 38, did not immediately respond to the charges during an appearance in U.S. District Court in nearby Alexandria, Va., a day after his arrest by FBI agents as he attempted to board a flight for Europe.
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BUSINESS
December 24, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TRW has quietly eliminated 3,300 jobs from its Los Angeles-area operations during 1992, including 1,600 through layoffs--part of 5,000 job cuts in its aerospace business nationwide, the company said Wednesday. The job losses reduce TRW's employment in Redondo Beach, San Bernardino and Dominguez Hills to 9,900, down from 13,200 at the start of the year.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The spectacular midair fireball that consumed a Titan IV rocket off the Santa Barbara coast this week may have incinerated a trio of secret ocean surveillance satellites designed to monitor Russian surface fleets and nuclear submarines, civilian and congressional space experts said Wednesday. Pentagon officials still refuse to publicly discuss the secret mission or the cost of Monday's accident. But a growing consensus of the civilian analysts who monitor the classified U.S.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Air Force awarded major development contracts to Rockwell International and TRW on Friday to competitively develop a network of surveillance satellites for the Strategic Defense Initiative--assuring that the multibillion-dollar space program and many of its jobs will ultimately be located in Southern California. The satellite network, known as Brilliant Eyes, would be used to detect the worldwide launch of ballistic missiles, both conventional and nuclear, and provide tracking for U.S.
NEWS
August 25, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A retired Air Force master sergeant working for a government contractor was charged Friday with conspiring to commit espionage in connection with the theft of classified data from a super-secret federal agency that designs and operates the nation's spy satellites. Brian P. Regan, 38, did not immediately respond to the charges during an appearance in U.S. District Court in nearby Alexandria, Va., a day after his arrest by FBI agents as he attempted to board a flight for Europe.
NEWS
May 15, 1987 | Associated Press
An Atlas rocket thundered into orbit this morning carrying a classified cargo which space policy specialists say probably is a cluster of Navy ocean surveillance satellites. The Air Force confirmed the launch at 8:45 a.m. from Space Launch Complex 3 of the Western Space and Missile Center here but declined to identify the cargo.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Lockheed Martin Corp., the biggest U.S. military contractor, said its fourth-quarter loss narrowed to $347 million as the government bought more surveillance satellites and software to manage its databases. The net loss shrank to 77 cents a share from $3.49 a share, or $1.5 billion, in the same period a year earlier. Sales rose 6.1% to $7.78 billion, Lockheed said.
NEWS
February 18, 1991
Iraq's militia, the Popular Army, has urged people in Baghdad to SET BONFIRES AND CAMOUFLAGE BRIDGES as protection from allied bombs. Tires, old clothes and shoes, bits of plastic, paper and other flammable materials that will create thick, black smoke are collected and set ablaze under bridges and around the capital, reports say. The smoke is intended to cut the visibility of allied pilots and to make it appear to surveillance satellites that parts of Baghdad are burning.
NEWS
October 12, 1986
Launch of a research satellite that spent 15 years on display at the Smithsonian Museum was postponed for several weeks because of problems with the guidance system, officials at Vandenberg Air Force Base said. The satellite, nicknamed Polar Bear (Polar Beacon Experiments and Auroral Research), contains three experiments aimed at improving communications between ground stations and weather and surveillance satellites that orbit Earth's poles.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TRW has quietly eliminated 3,300 jobs from its Los Angeles-area operations during 1992, including 1,600 through layoffs--part of 5,000 job cuts in its aerospace business nationwide, the company said Wednesday. The job losses reduce TRW's employment in Redondo Beach, San Bernardino and Dominguez Hills to 9,900, down from 13,200 at the start of the year.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Air Force awarded major development contracts to Rockwell International and TRW on Friday to competitively develop a network of surveillance satellites for the Strategic Defense Initiative--assuring that the multibillion-dollar space program and many of its jobs will ultimately be located in Southern California. The satellite network, known as Brilliant Eyes, would be used to detect the worldwide launch of ballistic missiles, both conventional and nuclear, and provide tracking for U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1996 | JOHN POPE
Project Space, a traveling exhibition billed as the largest display of NASA technology outside of the Smithsonian Museum, will be on display at the Westminster Mall Monday through Sept. 2. The exhibit includes spacesuits from Apollo and Space Shuttle missions, communication and surveillance satellites and photos. Models of the Titan V and Saturn rockets, lunar modules, a space station and the Hubble Telescope also will be on display. Astronaut Richard Gordon Jr.
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