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BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
If you're talking tech with Americans, you may want to avoid using any jargon. A recent study found that many Americans are lost when it comes to tech-related terms, with 11% in a survey saying that they thought HTML - a language that is used to create websites - was a sexually transmitted disease. The study was conducted by Vouchercloud.net , a coupons website, as a way to determine how knowledgeable users are when it comes to tech terms. VIDEO: Unboxing the Quirky Spotter multipurpose sensor "Technology is a huge interest for our user base, and month after month we see thousands of people visiting our site to look for coupons and deals to use when purchasing their favorite tech products," a company spokeswoman said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Returning from a recent leisure trip to Miami, Jerry Jorgensen landed in Detroit only to face one of the biggest frustrations of air travel: His bag was nowhere to be found. After making several dozen calls, Jorgensen got American Airlines to return his bag. But the Michigan dairy farmer was not happy. The airline "passed me around on the phone like a hot potato," he said. The good news about lost luggage is that airlines worldwide eventually recover 97% of mishandled bags. That is one of 10 surprising facts about flying with luggage that came out of a new study by international air transport technology specialist SITA.
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BUSINESS
August 19, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
It's getting ever harder to find free checking at the nation's banks, with barely three in 10 accounts coming with no monthly service fees, according to a new survey. Only 30.3% of checking accounts surveyed had no monthly charges as of June 30, down from 36.6% at the end of 2012, according to MoneyRates.com. That's the lowest rate of free checking since the website started its twice-annual report in 2009. Not surprisingly, online-only banks offer free checking far more readily than bricks-and-mortar institutions.
TRAVEL
March 30, 2014
Risks and warnings The State Department continues to warn U.S. citizens to defer all non-essential travel to Ukraine and all travel to the Crimean Peninsula and eastern areas of Kharkiv, Donetsk and Lugansk due to tensions in the region. The U.S. believes that Russia is likely to continue to take further actions in the Crimean Peninsula consistent with its claim of annexation. The State Department also warns U.S. citizens to consider carefully the risks of travel to Mali, given terrorist activity there.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
So much for the idea of West is best. In an annual survey, executives ranked California as the worst place to do business for the eighth year in a row. Chief Executive magazine has only been conducting its survey for eight years. Texas has been top-ranked every year. The survey considered responses from 650 business leaders, who graded states on factors such as taxes, regulations, living environment and more. Texas and second-ranked Florida have the highest migration rates in the nation for 2001 through 2009.
NEWS
February 22, 2012 | By Alejandro Lazo
Big financial institutions continue to foreclose on troubled borrowers in error -- either while a homeowner is awaiting a loan modification or because of fees incorrectly added to the seizure -- according to a national survey of attorneys representing borrowers. One intent of the recent $25-billion mortgage settlement among attorneys general, the nation's five largest mortgage servicers and certain federal agencies was to do away with such errors, but in recent weeks consumer advocates have raised concerns that borrowers who are in the foreclosure process may still be harmed.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A survey released this week found that there were more teens and young adults who said they use Tumblr on a regular basis than those who said they use Facebook. Fifty-nine percent of respondents between the ages of 13 and 25 said they use Tumblr regularly; 54% said they use Facebook on a regular basis. Among those 13 to 18, the percentage who said they use Tumblr regularly was even higher -- 61% compared with 55% who said they use Facebook regularly. The survey was conducted by Y Combinator start-up Survata.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2012 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- September looks like another mediocre month for job growth. Private-sector employers added 162,000 jobs last month, according to a survey released Wednesday by payroll processor Automatic Data Processing Inc. That doesn't bode well for the official monthly jobs report that will be issued Friday by the Labor Department. ADP's surveys have overshot the government's tally by an average of about 50,000 in recent months. As such, economists largely stuck with their forecast for about 120,000 new jobs in September.
NEWS
January 4, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
Fewer companies offered health insurance last year, and the ones that did charged employees more for their coverage. That's among the major findings of in an annual California Employer Health Benefits Survey released Wednesday by the California HealthCare Foundation, a research and grant-making nonprofit organization. According to the survey, premiums for employer health insurance plans rose 153.5% since 2002, a rate that's more than five times the increase in California's inflation rate.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2011 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
Although it's been more than two years since the market began a long rebound from its bear-market low, many individual investors remain extremely fearful of stocks. According to a survey released Wednesdayby Prudential Financial Inc., 58% of Americans say they've lost all faith in stocks, while 44% say they're unlikely to ever invest more money in the market. In one measure of what might be dubbed the New Trepidation, just 37% of investors say they're investing aggressively in stocks, down from 46% before the recession.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - President Obama's healthcare law, despite a rocky rollout and determined opposition from critics, already has spurred the largest expansion in health coverage in America in half a century, national surveys and enrollment data show. As the law's initial enrollment period closes, at least 9.5 million previously uninsured people have gained coverage. Some have done so through marketplaces created by the law, some through other private insurance and others through Medicaid, which has expanded under the law in about half the states.
SPORTS
March 25, 2014 | By Gary Klein
  Tre Madden is growing accustomed to spring restarts. In 2012, he moved from linebacker to tailback during spring practice but suffered a season-ending knee injury. Last year, he tested the knee during spring while readying for a breakout fall performance. Madden rushed for more than 100 yards in four of USC's first five games before a hamstring injury slowed or sidelined him in the final nine. On Tuesday, the junior from Aliso Viejo continued to show that the problems are behind him. He shared most of the first-team reps with Javorius Allen as the Trojans returned from a one-week break and went through another 120-play workout in Coach Steve Sarkisian's fast-paced, no-huddle offense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
About a quarter of UC students, faculty and staff reported that they had experienced some exclusionary, intimidating or offensive situations on campus and 9% said those incidents had interfered with their ability to study or work, according to a survey released by the university system Wednesday. Those results in the long-awaited Campus Climate survey elicited mixed responses from leaders of the 10-campus UC system. They said they were pleased that 73% of UC undergraduates reported feeling comfortable or very comfortable in their classes and just about 6% said they felt uncomfortable.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Artist Robert Heinecken (1931-2006) is best-known for cleverly manipulating found photographs plucked from mass media, which meant to undermine their authority in America's exploding image-culture. He's not included among the 36 artists in the historical group exhibition "Take It or Leave It" currently at the UCLA Hammer Museum, but he probably should be. A self-styled "para-photographer," Heinecken made pictures that crossed appropriation art with institutional critique, the Hammer show's theme.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
Californians aren't depending quite as heavily on cars for commutes and errands as they did a decade ago, according to a new survey by Caltrans. Although driving is still by far the most dominant mode of transportation across the state, accounting for about three-quarters of daily trips, researchers say a decrease in car usage and a rise in walking, biking and taking transit indicate that Californians' daily habits could be slowly changing....
OPINION
March 12, 2014 | Doyle McManus
The young are different from you and me - unless, of course, you happen to be one of them. If you're older than 34, I'm sorry to break it to you, but you're no longer the wave of the future. That distinction belongs to those born between 1980 and 2002, dubbed the "millennial generation" because they began to come of age at the turn of the century. They've grown up, most of them have found jobs (although that hasn't been easy) and they're a bigger, more powerful part of the electorate every year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013 | By Jason Song
USC President C. L. Max Nikias was the 13th-highest compensated private university president in 2011, making nearly $1.4 million in total pay, while former UC President Mark G. Yudof was the eighth-best paid public education executive, according to an annual survey released Sunday. University of Chicago President Robert J. Zimmer made nearly $3.3 million, ranking him first among private college or university chiefs, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education, while ex-Penn State University President Graham Spanier was the highest paid public president, making $2.9 million during the 2012 fiscal year.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Ninety percent of Americans said schools should take a role in combating obesity -- a surprising cut away from the idea that being overweight is a personal choice. That doesn't meant people don't see that they need to take action as well for themselves and their families, according to the results of a Field Research poll released Wednesday. “It really indicates a sea change in how people view the problem,” Loel Solomon, vice president for community health at Kaiser Permanente, said in an interview.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
For the seventh consecutive year, Kaiser Permanente ranked highest in customer satisfaction for health insurance among California policyholders, according to ratings firm J.D. Power & Associates. But two other major rivals -- Blue Shield of California and Anthem Blue Cross -- scored the lowest on member satisfaction among seven California health plans. In its annual survey, J.D. Power surveyed more than 34,000 customers of 136 commercial health plans in December and January in 18 regions across the country.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The amount Americans tip on restaurant bills appears to be declining compared with five years ago, a new survey found. The online poll of about 2,600 men and women in the U.S. found that a majority of Americans tip their food servers less than 20% and that one in 10 tip nothing at all. Nearly 60% of those who said they tip less than 20% said the reason was that they "couldn't afford to on top of the cost of a meal," the survey reported....
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