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ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Not even typically liberal Hollywood is free of anti-gay bias, according to a new study.  A survey of SAG-AFTRA members found that gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender actors continue to face discrimination when looking for work, though opportunities are increasing. About a third of those who responded to the survey by UCLA's Williams Institute and the entertainment union said that directors, casting directors and producers may be biased against LGBT performers. The study , to which roughly 5,700 people responded, also said more than half of LGBT performers had heard anti-gay comments while on set.   PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments "Coming out remains a significant and consequential decision for many performers, and we are committed to supporting our members in living honest and authentic personal and professional lives,” said Duncan Crabtree-Ireland, SAG-AFTRA's chief administrative officer and general counsel, in a statement.
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BUSINESS
September 2, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
The "staycation" is not yet dead, but its popularity may be waning. The tendency to stay close to home for vacation - a trend that became popular during the Great Recession - is losing its appeal as more Americans become interested in having a good time when they travel. The findings are from a survey of 2,527 U.S. households by the marketing and research firms of MMGY Global and Harrison Group. The survey found that the average amount spent on vacations over the last 12 months has grown to $4,461, compared with $3,874 during the same period two years ago. "It's not like everyone's financial situation has improved, but people went through a series of three or four years of paring back on expenses," said Peter Yesawich, vice chairman of MMGY Global.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Small-business owners were more optimistic about the economy last month and expected sales to increase as a winter marked by severe weather ended, according to survey results released Tuesday. The confidence index from the National Federation of Independent Business rose to 93.4 in March, from 91.4 the previous month. The measure is one of the few monthly barometers of the small-business sector, which is a key driver of the economy. Last month's increase nearly reversed a drop in February, but the index, which can range from 80 to 110, remains historically low as the economic recovery struggles to gain traction.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Think teens and twenty-somethings who are used to looking up everything on smartphones have little use for the public library? Think again. People in their 20s and older teens are just as likely as older Americans to have visited a public library in the last year -- and about as likely to have taken out books or browsed the shelves once they got there, a new study from the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project finds....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Screenwriters who once viewed television as inferior to the big screen increasingly are giving the small screen more props. That's one of the key takeaways from a survey by the Writers Guild of America, East, which polled about 20% of its 4,000 members who write for film, television and new media. Although more than half of the respondents said they wrote feature films in the last five years, nearly 90% said they intend to seek guild-covered work in television in the next year. "In other words, screenwriters plan to explore opportunities in TV,"  the guild said in a statement.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2012 | Bloomberg News
U.S. banks are relaxing their terms on credit cards and lending for autos and commercial real estate, according to a Federal Reserve survey. "Domestic banks, on balance, continued to report having eased their lending standards across most loan types over the past three months," the Fed said Monday in its quarterly survey of senior loan officers. Banks in the United States are lending the most since the recession ended in June 2009, supporting an economy burdened by 8.3% unemployment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
America's nonprofit theaters are feeling a bit better about their finances these days, according to a recent survey conducted by the sector's main national service organization, Theatre Communications Group. But the actors, directors and designers who work in those theaters shouldn't bank on a trickle-down effect boosting their standard of living. Asked to list their top five priorities for the coming year, only 19% of the 206 theaters surveyed by TCG and its partner, the Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
This year's college freshmen report feeling higher levels of emotional and financial stress than their predecessors did, according to a national survey conducted by UCLA researchers. The annual "American Freshman" report, released Thursday, showed that only about half of current first-year students, 51.9%, rated their emotional health above average or higher, down from 55.3% last year and the lowest since the question was first asked 25 years ago. Just 45.9% of women in the class described themselves as emotionally strong, compared with 59.1% of the men. In addition, nearly two-thirds of this year's freshmen, 62.1%, said the recession had affected their choice of college, and 73.4%, up from 70% last year, are depending on grants and scholarships to help them through.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
In one episode of the sitcom “Seinfeld,” George Costanza tries to impress his girlfriend by joining a book club. The first book he has to read is “Breakfast at Tiffany's,” by Truman Capote. For George, the novella is a slog: “If it's not about sports, I find it very hard to concentrate,” he says. So he watches the movie adaptation of the novel instead. Most people, in turns out, have done something like that to try to look smarter than they really are, according to a new British survey of 2,000 people.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
So much for the U.S. traveler's reputation as the "ugly Americans. " Americans are second only to Germans in the rate at which they leave tips at hotels and restaurants, according to a survey of more than 9,000 travelers in eight countries by the travel website TripAdvisor. QUIZ: How well do you know fast food? When asked how likely they are to tip, 69% of Germans say they always tip, compared with 57% of Americans, 53% of Russians, 40% of Brazilians and 39% of French and British.
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