Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSurvey
IN THE NEWS

Survey

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
This year's college freshmen report feeling higher levels of emotional and financial stress than their predecessors did, according to a national survey conducted by UCLA researchers. The annual "American Freshman" report, released Thursday, showed that only about half of current first-year students, 51.9%, rated their emotional health above average or higher, down from 55.3% last year and the lowest since the question was first asked 25 years ago. Just 45.9% of women in the class described themselves as emotionally strong, compared with 59.1% of the men. In addition, nearly two-thirds of this year's freshmen, 62.1%, said the recession had affected their choice of college, and 73.4%, up from 70% last year, are depending on grants and scholarships to help them through.
Advertisement
WORLD
August 19, 2010 | By Meris Lutz, Los Angeles Times
A survey of Syrians, conducted in secret because of government prohibitions, shows strong dissatisfaction with prevailing political and economic conditions. Though that may not be a surprise, the fact that any kind of opinion poll could be conducted in Syria, was certainly an eye-opener, the study's authors say. "The most surprising result had nothing to do with survey findings, but rather the fact that you could get this data collected. People really wanted to talk," said lead author, Angela Hawken of Pepperdine University.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Not even typically liberal Hollywood is free of anti-gay bias, according to a new study.  A survey of SAG-AFTRA members found that gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender actors continue to face discrimination when looking for work, though opportunities are increasing. About a third of those who responded to the survey by UCLA's Williams Institute and the entertainment union said that directors, casting directors and producers may be biased against LGBT performers. The study , to which roughly 5,700 people responded, also said more than half of LGBT performers had heard anti-gay comments while on set.   PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments "Coming out remains a significant and consequential decision for many performers, and we are committed to supporting our members in living honest and authentic personal and professional lives,” said Duncan Crabtree-Ireland, SAG-AFTRA's chief administrative officer and general counsel, in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Two Canadian cities, Vancouver and Montreal , have the world's best public library systems, according to a new survey by German researchers . Library mavens at the Heinrich Heine University in Dusseldorf studied libraries in 31 major world cities, from London and Los Angeles, and from Shanghai to Sao Paulo, Brazil. Los Angeles finished in the middle of the pack in the ranking (16th), which took into account the wide array of services that libraries provide to their readers, including availability of printed books and digital information.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
The "staycation" is not yet dead, but its popularity may be waning. The tendency to stay close to home for vacation - a trend that became popular during the Great Recession - is losing its appeal as more Americans become interested in having a good time when they travel. The findings are from a survey of 2,527 U.S. households by the marketing and research firms of MMGY Global and Harrison Group. The survey found that the average amount spent on vacations over the last 12 months has grown to $4,461, compared with $3,874 during the same period two years ago. "It's not like everyone's financial situation has improved, but people went through a series of three or four years of paring back on expenses," said Peter Yesawich, vice chairman of MMGY Global.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Screenwriters who once viewed television as inferior to the big screen increasingly are giving the small screen more props. That's one of the key takeaways from a survey by the Writers Guild of America, East, which polled about 20% of its 4,000 members who write for film, television and new media. Although more than half of the respondents said they wrote feature films in the last five years, nearly 90% said they intend to seek guild-covered work in television in the next year. "In other words, screenwriters plan to explore opportunities in TV,"  the guild said in a statement.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
In the annals of image problems, the banking industry ranks right up there .... er, down there ... in the company of Congress, with a high-profile survey ranking Bank of America Corp. at the bottom of the heap.  Five years after the financial crisis, the Reputation Institute survey said banking has a worse reputation than Big Pharma, news outlets, oil companies and telecommunications firms -- though not so bad as Congress. The most highly regarded industries were transport, consumer products, industrial products, food manufacturing and computers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
America's nonprofit theaters are feeling a bit better about their finances these days, according to a recent survey conducted by the sector's main national service organization, Theatre Communications Group. But the actors, directors and designers who work in those theaters shouldn't bank on a trickle-down effect boosting their standard of living. Asked to list their top five priorities for the coming year, only 19% of the 206 theaters surveyed by TCG and its partner, the Assn.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Think teens and twenty-somethings who are used to looking up everything on smartphones have little use for the public library? Think again. People in their 20s and older teens are just as likely as older Americans to have visited a public library in the last year -- and about as likely to have taken out books or browsed the shelves once they got there, a new study from the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project finds....
BUSINESS
July 9, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Small-business optimism fell in June, a turnaround from a slight increase in May, according to a survey from the National Federation of Independent Business. The group's economic index fell to 93.5, from 94.4 in May, which was its second-highest reading since the recession started. Job-creation plans increased slightly in June, the group reported, but expectations for improved business conditions remained negative. “The economy remains 'bifurcated,' with the big firms producing most of the GDP growth with little help from small business,” Bill Dunkelberg, the group's chief economist, said in a statement.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|