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BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
If you're talking tech with Americans, you may want to avoid using any jargon. A recent study found that many Americans are lost when it comes to tech-related terms, with 11% in a survey saying that they thought HTML - a language that is used to create websites - was a sexually transmitted disease. The study was conducted by Vouchercloud.net , a coupons website, as a way to determine how knowledgeable users are when it comes to tech terms. VIDEO: Unboxing the Quirky Spotter multipurpose sensor "Technology is a huge interest for our user base, and month after month we see thousands of people visiting our site to look for coupons and deals to use when purchasing their favorite tech products," a company spokeswoman said in a statement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
This year's college freshmen report feeling higher levels of emotional and financial stress than their predecessors did, according to a national survey conducted by UCLA researchers. The annual "American Freshman" report, released Thursday, showed that only about half of current first-year students, 51.9%, rated their emotional health above average or higher, down from 55.3% last year and the lowest since the question was first asked 25 years ago. Just 45.9% of women in the class described themselves as emotionally strong, compared with 59.1% of the men. In addition, nearly two-thirds of this year's freshmen, 62.1%, said the recession had affected their choice of college, and 73.4%, up from 70% last year, are depending on grants and scholarships to help them through.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Think teens and twenty-somethings who are used to looking up everything on smartphones have little use for the public library? Think again. People in their 20s and older teens are just as likely as older Americans to have visited a public library in the last year -- and about as likely to have taken out books or browsed the shelves once they got there, a new study from the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project finds....
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Ninety percent of Americans said schools should take a role in combating obesity -- a surprising cut away from the idea that being overweight is a personal choice. That doesn't meant people don't see that they need to take action as well for themselves and their families, according to the results of a Field Research poll released Wednesday. β€œIt really indicates a sea change in how people view the problem,” Loel Solomon, vice president for community health at Kaiser Permanente, said in an interview.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
With average gasoline prices topping $4 a gallon, fewer Southern California residents say they plan to take a leisure trip over spring break, according to a survey by the Auto Club of Southern California. The annual survey of Auto Club members found that 47% said they plan at least one leisure trip this spring break season, compared to 57% in 2012 and 55% in 2011. High gasoline prices prompted 69% of those polled to say they made at least one significant cut to their budget, compared to 66% in 2012 and 61% in 2011.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1995
"Survey on Kurds Challenges View of the Turkish Hard-Liners" (Aug. 19), although not deliberately, misrepresents the Kurdish issue. For example, you missed the bottom line that a majority of the Turkish citizens with Kurdish descent are against an independent Kurdistan. The survey is under fire from all quarters and the debate is not over yet. Some question the reliability of this survey and produce very convincing arguments that the survey was designed to produce predetermined results to support convictions long held by the advocates of PKK and separatists.
NEWS
June 20, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Perhaps you recall that McKinsey report a few weeks back saying that nearly a third of employers might drop healthcare benefits when the healthcare overhaul takes effect. The report itself was the subject of many headlines. Then came the reaction from the White House and other supporters of the overhaul. That garnered more headlines – and a demand for McKinsey to explain its methodology. Now it's McKinsey's turn again. In a statement Monday, McKinsey & Co. had this to say: "We stand by the integrity and methodology of the survey.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2012 | Bloomberg News
U.S. banks are relaxing their terms on credit cards and lending for autos and commercial real estate, according to a Federal Reserve survey. "Domestic banks, on balance, continued to report having eased their lending standards across most loan types over the past three months," the Fed said Monday in its quarterly survey of senior loan officers. Banks in the United States are lending the most since the recession ended in June 2009, supporting an economy burdened by 8.3% unemployment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
America's nonprofit theaters are feeling a bit better about their finances these days, according to a recent survey conducted by the sector's main national service organization, Theatre Communications Group. But the actors, directors and designers who work in those theaters shouldn't bank on a trickle-down effect boosting their standard of living. Asked to list their top five priorities for the coming year, only 19% of the 206 theaters surveyed by TCG and its partner, the Assn.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
So much for the U.S. traveler's reputation as the "ugly Americans. " Americans are second only to Germans in the rate at which they leave tips at hotels and restaurants, according to a survey of more than 9,000 travelers in eight countries by the travel website TripAdvisor. QUIZ: How well do you know fast food? When asked how likely they are to tip, 69% of Germans say they always tip, compared with 57% of Americans, 53% of Russians, 40% of Brazilians and 39% of French and British.
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