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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013 | By Jason Song
USC President C. L. Max Nikias was the 13th-highest compensated private university president in 2011, making nearly $1.4 million in total pay, while former UC President Mark G. Yudof was the eighth-best paid public education executive, according to an annual survey released Sunday. University of Chicago President Robert J. Zimmer made nearly $3.3 million, ranking him first among private college or university chiefs, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education, while ex-Penn State University President Graham Spanier was the highest paid public president, making $2.9 million during the 2012 fiscal year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
In one episode of the sitcom “Seinfeld,” George Costanza tries to impress his girlfriend by joining a book club. The first book he has to read is “Breakfast at Tiffany's,” by Truman Capote. For George, the novella is a slog: “If it's not about sports, I find it very hard to concentrate,” he says. So he watches the movie adaptation of the novel instead. Most people, in turns out, have done something like that to try to look smarter than they really are, according to a new British survey of 2,000 people.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By Shan Li
An increasing number of Americans, taking the glass-is-half-empty approach, believe the economy has gone through a permanent change for the worse since the Great Recession, a survey found. Six in 10 Americans now think that the economy has changed irrevocably, up from 56% in 2010 who thought so, according to a survey by the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University. Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed say the economy will never fully recover, while more than half think it will take at least six years, if not more, for the county to copletely shake off the damage from the Great recession.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Small-business owners were more optimistic about the economy last month and expected sales to increase as a winter marked by severe weather ended, according to survey results released Tuesday. The confidence index from the National Federation of Independent Business rose to 93.4 in March, from 91.4 the previous month. The measure is one of the few monthly barometers of the small-business sector, which is a key driver of the economy. Last month's increase nearly reversed a drop in February, but the index, which can range from 80 to 110, remains historically low as the economic recovery struggles to gain traction.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2012 | Bloomberg News
U.S. banks are relaxing their terms on credit cards and lending for autos and commercial real estate, according to a Federal Reserve survey. "Domestic banks, on balance, continued to report having eased their lending standards across most loan types over the past three months," the Fed said Monday in its quarterly survey of senior loan officers. Banks in the United States are lending the most since the recession ended in June 2009, supporting an economy burdened by 8.3% unemployment.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
It's getting ever harder to find free checking at the nation's banks, with barely three in 10 accounts coming with no monthly service fees, according to a new survey. Only 30.3% of checking accounts surveyed had no monthly charges as of June 30, down from 36.6% at the end of 2012, according to MoneyRates.com. That's the lowest rate of free checking since the website started its twice-annual report in 2009. Not surprisingly, online-only banks offer free checking far more readily than bricks-and-mortar institutions.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Vacation? Who's got time for a vacation? That seems to be the attitude of many Americans, according to a new national survey that shows 48% of adults passed up on using at least half of their vacation time in 2011. The survey of 1,000 adults by Los Angeles-based Kelton Research for Radisson Hotels & Resorts found that Americans are given an average of 18 vacation days a year. But those Americans who said they passed on using half or more of their vacation time blamed a heavy workload and not wanting to play catch-up after returning to work.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
So much for the U.S. traveler's reputation as the "ugly Americans. " Americans are second only to Germans in the rate at which they leave tips at hotels and restaurants, according to a survey of more than 9,000 travelers in eight countries by the travel website TripAdvisor. QUIZ: How well do you know fast food? When asked how likely they are to tip, 69% of Germans say they always tip, compared with 57% of Americans, 53% of Russians, 40% of Brazilians and 39% of French and British.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
With average gasoline prices topping $4 a gallon, fewer Southern California residents say they plan to take a leisure trip over spring break, according to a survey by the Auto Club of Southern California. The annual survey of Auto Club members found that 47% said they plan at least one leisure trip this spring break season, compared to 57% in 2012 and 55% in 2011. High gasoline prices prompted 69% of those polled to say they made at least one significant cut to their budget, compared to 66% in 2012 and 61% in 2011.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Despite a still uncertain global economy, many travelers worldwide are planning to spend more on their vacations this year compared with last year, with Chinese vacationers expected to be the biggest spenders of all. Of 5,000 travelers surveyed around the world, 70% said they planned to spend the same or more on vacation travel in 2012 than last year, according to a report commissioned by Wyndham Hotel Group, the world's largest hotel company....
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