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BUSINESS
July 9, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Small-business optimism fell in June, a turnaround from a slight increase in May, according to a survey from the National Federation of Independent Business. The group's economic index fell to 93.5, from 94.4 in May, which was its second-highest reading since the recession started. Job-creation plans increased slightly in June, the group reported, but expectations for improved business conditions remained negative. “The economy remains 'bifurcated,' with the big firms producing most of the GDP growth with little help from small business,” Bill Dunkelberg, the group's chief economist, said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By Shan Li
An increasing number of Americans, taking the glass-is-half-empty approach, believe the economy has gone through a permanent change for the worse since the Great Recession, a survey found. Six in 10 Americans now think that the economy has changed irrevocably, up from 56% in 2010 who thought so, according to a survey by the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University. Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed say the economy will never fully recover, while more than half think it will take at least six years, if not more, for the county to copletely shake off the damage from the Great recession.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Improving economic data haven't put many Americans in the yuletide spirit, with nearly four in 10 saying they will spend less this holiday season than they did last year, according to survey results released Monday. Just 14% of consumers in the Bankrate.com survey said they planned to increase their holiday spending. Nearly half -- 47% -- said they planned to spend the same amount. But 38% of the respondents in the Dec. 5-8 survey said they would spend less this year on gifts and other purchases.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By James Rainey
Cable television has become the top source of news about the presidential campaign, while fewer Americans turn to their local TV stations and the networks, according to a survey by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. While public attention to cable news has remained steady over the last four presidential cycles, the attention to other television outlets and to newspapers for election information has declined. Perhaps most surprisingly, the Pew survey found that the percentage of those saying they use the Internet to access campaign news has stayed about the same as it was four years ago. The percentage of the audience who say they regularly get information on the 2012 race was 36% from cable news, 32% from local TV, 26% from network TV, 25% from the Internet and 20% from newspapers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
America's nonprofit theaters are feeling a bit better about their finances these days, according to a recent survey conducted by the sector's main national service organization, Theatre Communications Group. But the actors, directors and designers who work in those theaters shouldn't bank on a trickle-down effect boosting their standard of living. Asked to list their top five priorities for the coming year, only 19% of the 206 theaters surveyed by TCG and its partner, the Assn.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
If you're talking tech with Americans, you may want to avoid using any jargon. A recent study found that many Americans are lost when it comes to tech-related terms, with 11% in a survey saying that they thought HTML - a language that is used to create websites - was a sexually transmitted disease. The study was conducted by Vouchercloud.net , a coupons website, as a way to determine how knowledgeable users are when it comes to tech terms. VIDEO: Unboxing the Quirky Spotter multipurpose sensor "Technology is a huge interest for our user base, and month after month we see thousands of people visiting our site to look for coupons and deals to use when purchasing their favorite tech products," a company spokeswoman said in a statement.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Well, that's one way to get into an Ivy League school. According to an email survey of more than 1,300 incoming Harvard students, the Harvard Crimson reports , 10% of the campus' new freshman class have cheated on tests and 42% have cheated on homework. That's probably going to be unwelcome news for the 377-year-old university, which is still recovering from a 2012 scandal in which more than 100 students were accused of cheating on a take-home exam for an introductory-level class on Congress.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- More than half of Americans consider the effects on the environment of products and services they buy, according to a new national survey. “Consumer behavior has become an important way Americans express their values and concerns, leading to new products and services, creating and destroying markets, and influencing the policies and actions of companies large and small,” according to the report, Americans' Actions to Limit Global Warming April 2013 , by the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication and the George Mason University Center on Climate Change Communication.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Nearly half of Wall Streeters expect bigger annual bonuses this year, an industry study has found. Forty-eight percent of the 911 financial-services employees surveyed by EFinancialCareers believe their payouts will be higher than last year, the survey found. That's an increase from last year, when the survey found 41% believing their bonuses would jump. “The mood is better, some people will be happier, but we still have another quarter to go,” Constance Melrose, a managing director for EFinancialCareers, told Bloomberg News.
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