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BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By Shan Li
An increasing number of Americans, taking the glass-is-half-empty approach, believe the economy has gone through a permanent change for the worse since the Great Recession, a survey found. Six in 10 Americans now think that the economy has changed irrevocably, up from 56% in 2010 who thought so, according to a survey by the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University. Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed say the economy will never fully recover, while more than half think it will take at least six years, if not more, for the county to copletely shake off the damage from the Great recession.
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BUSINESS
March 12, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
California's small-business owners worry about the economy, regulatory burdens and taxes, but they're also concerned about the deteriorating quality of public education and crumbling roads and other public works. Those are the findings of an annual survey of 1,067 small-business executives just released by Small Business California, an advocacy group. Employers -- just over half of them with 19 workers or less -- have trouble finding capable staff and then have trouble navigating clogged freeways, said Scott Hauge, a San Francisco insurance broker who is Small Business California's founder and president.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Further evidence has emerged that Hollywood has made little progress in hiring women and minorities to work on prime-time television shows. A survey conducted by the Directors Guild of America of more than 2,600 television episodes from 170 scripted TV series for the 2010-11 season found that white males directed 77% of all episodes, and white females directed 11% of all episodes. Minority males directed 11% all episodes and minority females directed just 1% of the shows, according to the DGA survey.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By James Rainey
Cable television has become the top source of news about the presidential campaign, while fewer Americans turn to their local TV stations and the networks, according to a survey by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. While public attention to cable news has remained steady over the last four presidential cycles, the attention to other television outlets and to newspapers for election information has declined. Perhaps most surprisingly, the Pew survey found that the percentage of those saying they use the Internet to access campaign news has stayed about the same as it was four years ago. The percentage of the audience who say they regularly get information on the 2012 race was 36% from cable news, 32% from local TV, 26% from network TV, 25% from the Internet and 20% from newspapers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
In one episode of the sitcom “Seinfeld,” George Costanza tries to impress his girlfriend by joining a book club. The first book he has to read is “Breakfast at Tiffany's,” by Truman Capote. For George, the novella is a slog: “If it's not about sports, I find it very hard to concentrate,” he says. So he watches the movie adaptation of the novel instead. Most people, in turns out, have done something like that to try to look smarter than they really are, according to a new British survey of 2,000 people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1989
Did someone slip up? As I read through this morning's (Dec.13) Times, I became aware that no poll or survey results cluttered its pages. Sometimes I think if I see one more Times Poll, I will scream. You people take a poll about everything! How about polling people on their feelings about public opinion polls? 1. Do you believe polls are accurate? 2. Do you believe the wording of a question can influence the response so that a pollster can obtain any results desired? 3. Are you tired of The Times--and other media--polls?
NATIONAL
June 25, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Think teens and twenty-somethings who are used to looking up everything on smartphones have little use for the public library? Think again. People in their 20s and older teens are just as likely as older Americans to have visited a public library in the last year -- and about as likely to have taken out books or browsed the shelves once they got there, a new study from the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project finds....
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Ninety percent of Americans said schools should take a role in combating obesity -- a surprising cut away from the idea that being overweight is a personal choice. That doesn't meant people don't see that they need to take action as well for themselves and their families, according to the results of a Field Research poll released Wednesday. “It really indicates a sea change in how people view the problem,” Loel Solomon, vice president for community health at Kaiser Permanente, said in an interview.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Well, that's one way to get into an Ivy League school. According to an email survey of more than 1,300 incoming Harvard students, the Harvard Crimson reports , 10% of the campus' new freshman class have cheated on tests and 42% have cheated on homework. That's probably going to be unwelcome news for the 377-year-old university, which is still recovering from a 2012 scandal in which more than 100 students were accused of cheating on a take-home exam for an introductory-level class on Congress.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
It's getting ever harder to find free checking at the nation's banks, with barely three in 10 accounts coming with no monthly service fees, according to a new survey. Only 30.3% of checking accounts surveyed had no monthly charges as of June 30, down from 36.6% at the end of 2012, according to MoneyRates.com. That's the lowest rate of free checking since the website started its twice-annual report in 2009. Not surprisingly, online-only banks offer free checking far more readily than bricks-and-mortar institutions.
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