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NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By James Rainey
Cable television has become the top source of news about the presidential campaign, while fewer Americans turn to their local TV stations and the networks, according to a survey by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. While public attention to cable news has remained steady over the last four presidential cycles, the attention to other television outlets and to newspapers for election information has declined. Perhaps most surprisingly, the Pew survey found that the percentage of those saying they use the Internet to access campaign news has stayed about the same as it was four years ago. The percentage of the audience who say they regularly get information on the 2012 race was 36% from cable news, 32% from local TV, 26% from network TV, 25% from the Internet and 20% from newspapers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
America's nonprofit theaters are feeling a bit better about their finances these days, according to a recent survey conducted by the sector's main national service organization, Theatre Communications Group. But the actors, directors and designers who work in those theaters shouldn't bank on a trickle-down effect boosting their standard of living. Asked to list their top five priorities for the coming year, only 19% of the 206 theaters surveyed by TCG and its partner, the Assn.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Think teens and twenty-somethings who are used to looking up everything on smartphones have little use for the public library? Think again. People in their 20s and older teens are just as likely as older Americans to have visited a public library in the last year -- and about as likely to have taken out books or browsed the shelves once they got there, a new study from the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project finds....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
This year's college freshmen report feeling higher levels of emotional and financial stress than their predecessors did, according to a national survey conducted by UCLA researchers. The annual "American Freshman" report, released Thursday, showed that only about half of current first-year students, 51.9%, rated their emotional health above average or higher, down from 55.3% last year and the lowest since the question was first asked 25 years ago. Just 45.9% of women in the class described themselves as emotionally strong, compared with 59.1% of the men. In addition, nearly two-thirds of this year's freshmen, 62.1%, said the recession had affected their choice of college, and 73.4%, up from 70% last year, are depending on grants and scholarships to help them through.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Two Canadian cities, Vancouver and Montreal , have the world's best public library systems, according to a new survey by German researchers . Library mavens at the Heinrich Heine University in Dusseldorf studied libraries in 31 major world cities, from London and Los Angeles, and from Shanghai to Sao Paulo, Brazil. Los Angeles finished in the middle of the pack in the ranking (16th), which took into account the wide array of services that libraries provide to their readers, including availability of printed books and digital information.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Nearly half of Wall Streeters expect bigger annual bonuses this year, an industry study has found. Forty-eight percent of the 911 financial-services employees surveyed by EFinancialCareers believe their payouts will be higher than last year, the survey found. That's an increase from last year, when the survey found 41% believing their bonuses would jump. “The mood is better, some people will be happier, but we still have another quarter to go,” Constance Melrose, a managing director for EFinancialCareers, told Bloomberg News.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- More than half of Americans consider the effects on the environment of products and services they buy, according to a new national survey. “Consumer behavior has become an important way Americans express their values and concerns, leading to new products and services, creating and destroying markets, and influencing the policies and actions of companies large and small,” according to the report, Americans' Actions to Limit Global Warming April 2013 , by the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication and the George Mason University Center on Climate Change Communication.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
Online lender Quicken Loans sits atop J.D. Power & Associates' survey of mortgage customer satisfaction for a fourth straight year. Quicken rated 841 overall out of a possible 1,000, according to J.D. Power, a Westlake Village market researcher. The Detroit-based lender received top ratings in all categories: the application and approval process, interactions with loan representatives, the closing experience, and level and quality of contact. BB&T Corp. of Winston-Salem, N.C., ranked second at 798 with high scores in all categories.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A survey released this week found that there were more teens and young adults who said they use Tumblr on a regular basis than those who said they use Facebook. Fifty-nine percent of respondents between the ages of 13 and 25 said they use Tumblr regularly; 54% said they use Facebook on a regular basis. Among those 13 to 18, the percentage who said they use Tumblr regularly was even higher -- 61% compared with 55% who said they use Facebook regularly. The survey was conducted by Y Combinator start-up Survata.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Ninety percent of Americans said schools should take a role in combating obesity -- a surprising cut away from the idea that being overweight is a personal choice. That doesn't meant people don't see that they need to take action as well for themselves and their families, according to the results of a Field Research poll released Wednesday. “It really indicates a sea change in how people view the problem,” Loel Solomon, vice president for community health at Kaiser Permanente, said in an interview.
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