Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSurvey
IN THE NEWS

Survey

NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By James Rainey
Cable television has become the top source of news about the presidential campaign, while fewer Americans turn to their local TV stations and the networks, according to a survey by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. While public attention to cable news has remained steady over the last four presidential cycles, the attention to other television outlets and to newspapers for election information has declined. Perhaps most surprisingly, the Pew survey found that the percentage of those saying they use the Internet to access campaign news has stayed about the same as it was four years ago. The percentage of the audience who say they regularly get information on the 2012 race was 36% from cable news, 32% from local TV, 26% from network TV, 25% from the Internet and 20% from newspapers.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
America's nonprofit theaters are feeling a bit better about their finances these days, according to a recent survey conducted by the sector's main national service organization, Theatre Communications Group. But the actors, directors and designers who work in those theaters shouldn't bank on a trickle-down effect boosting their standard of living. Asked to list their top five priorities for the coming year, only 19% of the 206 theaters surveyed by TCG and its partner, the Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
In one episode of the sitcom “Seinfeld,” George Costanza tries to impress his girlfriend by joining a book club. The first book he has to read is “Breakfast at Tiffany's,” by Truman Capote. For George, the novella is a slog: “If it's not about sports, I find it very hard to concentrate,” he says. So he watches the movie adaptation of the novel instead. Most people, in turns out, have done something like that to try to look smarter than they really are, according to a new British survey of 2,000 people.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Think teens and twenty-somethings who are used to looking up everything on smartphones have little use for the public library? Think again. People in their 20s and older teens are just as likely as older Americans to have visited a public library in the last year -- and about as likely to have taken out books or browsed the shelves once they got there, a new study from the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project finds....
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Two Canadian cities, Vancouver and Montreal , have the world's best public library systems, according to a new survey by German researchers . Library mavens at the Heinrich Heine University in Dusseldorf studied libraries in 31 major world cities, from London and Los Angeles, and from Shanghai to Sao Paulo, Brazil. Los Angeles finished in the middle of the pack in the ranking (16th), which took into account the wide array of services that libraries provide to their readers, including availability of printed books and digital information.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A survey released this week found that there were more teens and young adults who said they use Tumblr on a regular basis than those who said they use Facebook. Fifty-nine percent of respondents between the ages of 13 and 25 said they use Tumblr regularly; 54% said they use Facebook on a regular basis. Among those 13 to 18, the percentage who said they use Tumblr regularly was even higher -- 61% compared with 55% who said they use Facebook regularly. The survey was conducted by Y Combinator start-up Survata.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- More than half of Americans consider the effects on the environment of products and services they buy, according to a new national survey. “Consumer behavior has become an important way Americans express their values and concerns, leading to new products and services, creating and destroying markets, and influencing the policies and actions of companies large and small,” according to the report, Americans' Actions to Limit Global Warming April 2013 , by the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication and the George Mason University Center on Climate Change Communication.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Ninety percent of Americans said schools should take a role in combating obesity -- a surprising cut away from the idea that being overweight is a personal choice. That doesn't meant people don't see that they need to take action as well for themselves and their families, according to the results of a Field Research poll released Wednesday. “It really indicates a sea change in how people view the problem,” Loel Solomon, vice president for community health at Kaiser Permanente, said in an interview.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Nearly half of Wall Streeters expect bigger annual bonuses this year, an industry study has found. Forty-eight percent of the 911 financial-services employees surveyed by EFinancialCareers believe their payouts will be higher than last year, the survey found. That's an increase from last year, when the survey found 41% believing their bonuses would jump. “The mood is better, some people will be happier, but we still have another quarter to go,” Constance Melrose, a managing director for EFinancialCareers, told Bloomberg News.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
It's getting ever harder to find free checking at the nation's banks, with barely three in 10 accounts coming with no monthly service fees, according to a new survey. Only 30.3% of checking accounts surveyed had no monthly charges as of June 30, down from 36.6% at the end of 2012, according to MoneyRates.com. That's the lowest rate of free checking since the website started its twice-annual report in 2009. Not surprisingly, online-only banks offer free checking far more readily than bricks-and-mortar institutions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|