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SPORTS
May 9, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, Times Staff Writer
Lori Rafferty was looking for adventure when she joined the crew of a 41-foot racing yacht being delivered from Hawaii to Sydney, Australia, in 1980. What she got was a harrowing test of survival. Somewhere in the South Pacific near American Samoa, the yacht Impetuous encountered a raging storm that broke the vessel's mast. Then the wind died. The crew--four men and two women--was stranded in a vast seascape for almost two weeks. As they edged toward Samoa, sending faint emergency signals as best they could, they depleted their food and water.
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NATIONAL
April 9, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - A broken leg. A shattered ankle. A broken arm. A fractured eye socket. And a memory of terror that will be with her forever, its soundtrack an "unexplainable" noise "that will never get out of my head. " That is what Amanda Skorjanc, 25, remembers after the March 22 Oso landslide that destroyed her home, almost wiped her little town off the map and nearly killed her infant son, Duke Suddarth, who was 22 weeks old when the disaster struck. At least 36 people were killed and 10 others remain missing.
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NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
So, you have to fly soon, but Saturday's dramatic crash of an Asiana Airlines jetliner in San Francisco has given you a bad case of the jitters?  Short of driving, or taking the train or a ship -- or canceling your trip -- there's not much choice for modern-day travelers besides airliners.   But, is there anything you can do to increase your odds of survival in a plane crash? Yes. You can watch where you sit -- and find a seat in the back of the plane. Remember that statistics class you failed in high school?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Claire Noland
Mary Anderson, a redheaded actress who auditioned for the part of Scarlett O'Hara in the 1939 epic "Gone With the Wind" but wound up playing a supporting role as Maybelle Merriwether, died Sunday. She was 96. A longtime resident of Brentwood, Anderson died under hospice care in Burbank. She had been in declining health and had suffered a series of small strokes, said her longtime friend Betty Landess. Anderson was one of the last surviving cast members of the film adaptation of Margaret Mitchell's Civil War novel.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Anne Colby
There's nothing quite like an early-morning jolt to bring home the need for an up-to-date earthquake survival kit. This morning's magnitude 4.4 earthquake was a good reminder for Southern Californians that they need to be prepared. What should you have in your earthquake emergency kit? The essentials include a flashlight, a portable radio and a first-aid kit. And of course you need instant, dry and canned food (and a can opener) and plenty of water. And don't forget blankets, extra clothing and sturdy shoes, as well as personal hygiene items.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Celine Wright
Discovery Channel producer Steve Rankin made headlines when he was bit by a deadly pit viper in early May. After being rushed to the hospital from the remote Costa Rican wilderness, and after several serious surgeries, he is lucky to still have his foot. Rankin was scouting locations for his new show, “Naked and Afraid,” which drew an impressive 4.1 million total viewers to its premiere in June. His injury mirrored those possible in the extreme survival series, which casts two survival experts (one man, one woman)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
After an atomic apocalypse, only 10 people out of a group of 21 can live in a specially outfitted bunker for a year, at which point they will restart civilization as we know it. Which 10 would you pick - and why? This is the set-up of "After the Dark," an unusually creative and ambitious film of ideas that offers so much more than its forgettable title and sensationalized publicity may imply. Impressively written and directed by John Huddles, this existential sci-fi thriller follows a so-called thought experiment in which one Mr. Zimit (James D'Arcy)
NATIONAL
July 13, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
William Martin LaFever has lots of reasons for still being alive after wandering for weeks in the remote Escalante Desert of southern Utah. One is the sheer luck that searchers put a rescue helicopter in just the right place; that was what ended one of the most amazing -- and perhaps luckiest -- survival stories in years. But Garfield County, Utah, sheriff's authorities point to one other providential fact: LaFever is autistic, which might have led him to stay close to the life-giving Escalante River.
OPINION
November 27, 2011 | By Caroline Moorehead
On Jan. 24, 1943, 230 French women who had been arrested for resistance activities were put on a train at Compiegne, outside Paris, and sent to Auschwitz. The youngest had just celebrated her 17th birthday; the oldest was 67. They were teachers and seamstresses, students and farmers' wives; there was a doctor, a dentist and several editors and chemists. They were to be a lesson to other would-be troublemakers. The women were not Jewish, so they were not sent immediately to be gassed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2012 | By Scott Martelle, Tribune newspapers
The most remarkable achievement within Charlotte Rogan's debut novel, "The Lifeboat," is how neatly it exceeds, and defies, expectations. The plot seems basic: Some people clamber aboard a lifeboat as a ship sinks, and we think we're all set for a tale in which someone inevitably will be eaten for dinner. But Rogan delivers something entirely different (rest easy, no one gets eaten) by using a familiar setting to explore moral ambiguity, human nature and the psychology of manipulation.
SPORTS
March 28, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
Arizona and San Diego State did not meet in 2011 when both schools advanced to the NCAA tournament's West Regional finals at Honda Center. They met Thursday night -- like a fist meets a face. Maybe it was the underdog factor that produced so much ferocity in San Diego State's play, the upstart Mountain West Conference taking on a Pac-12 Conference powerhouse in a Pac-12 town. Whatever it was, shots flew, elbows flew and sparks flew Top-seeded Arizona had to scrap for every point and possession to escape with a 70-64 win before a crowd of 17,773.
WORLD
March 28, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
HOMS, Syria - On the ragged fringes of the Old City, aid workers, clerics and government troops stood vigil, awaiting a U.N. convoy evacuating women, children and the aged from the besieged ancient quarter of a town known to many as ground zero in the Syrian civil war. But the buses disgorged a very different class of passengers: scores of young men, haggard and sallow-faced, blankets draped over their shoulders and fear evident in their eyes....
BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Even before the disappearance of its Boeing 777, Malaysia Airlines faced financial turbulence and stiff competition from low-cost carriers in Asia. Still, airline experts say Malaysia's flagship carrier could survive the economic blow of the disaster by responding with new management and a safety campaign, among other changes. "The airline needs to show it is committed to safety, security and reliability," said Henry H. Harteveldt, a travel industry analyst for advisory firm Hudson Crossing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
TECOPA, Calif. - Under a canopy of gleaming stars, Janet Foley made her way across a dab of marshlands surrounded by harsh Mojave Desert terrain, her headlamp fixed on a live trap the size of a loaf of bread. She peered inside, smiled and said, "Hi there, cutie. " The creature staring back at her was a federally endangered Amargosa vole, one of the rarest mammals in North America. Foley recorded its vital statistics, attached an identification tag to its right ear and released it back into the wild.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
An Anaheim police dog that was shot in the face Thursday during a probation search and officer-involved shooting is expected to survive after undergoing extensive surgery. The chain of events began Thursday at 1:45 p.m. as two Orange County probation officers went to a home in the 1100 block of Mayfair Avenue, according to KTLA . The probationer they were looking for was with two men who fled as authorities approached. One of the men shot at officers multiple times, Anaheim police said.
SCIENCE
March 20, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Why do our eyes open wide when we feel fear or narrow to slits when we express disgust? According to new research, it has to do with survival. In a paper published Thursday in the journal Psychological Science, researchers concluded that expressions of fear and disgust altered the way human eyes gather and focus light. They argued that these changes were the result of evolutionary development and were intended to help humans survive, or at least detect, very different threats.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Detroit rapper Eminem released the first glimpse of his forthcoming, as-yet-untitled new album via a “Call of Duty: Ghost” trailer on Wednesday, and it shows a man focused on a return to greatness as voluminous, venom-filled and explosive as the visuals that the song soundtracks. Called “Survival,” the track shows the man born Marshall Mathers at an aggressive peak, delivering cuss-filled lines about his return: “I'm … back again with another anthem/Why stop when it doesn't have to end?
HEALTH
January 17, 2011
No one really knows what dreams are for. But evolutionary psychologists theorize that humans started dreaming to promote survival by "rehearsing" adaptive responses to challenges. "In prehistory it was, 'How do I get away from saber-toothed tigers?'" says Sandy Ginsberg, an Encino psychotherapist who leads a weekly dream group and says she's had, and heard, her own share of recession dreams of late. "We're still dreaming about how to survive. " About two-thirds of people surveyed say they've solved a practical problem in dreams, adds Deirdre Barrett, a clinical psychologist who teaches at Harvard Medical School ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Joe Mozingo
A Van Nuys man survived two nights in a canyon north of Castaic Lake after the pickup he was riding in plunged 250 feet off a winding mountain road, officials said. The 65-year-old driver of the 1995 GMC Sierra was killed, according to a report from the California Highway Patrol. His name was not released, pending notification of next of kin. The survivor, Alvaro Avila, 39, of Van Nuys, suffered a broken pelvis and internal injuries to his torso. Both men were wearing seat belts.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Anne Colby
There's nothing quite like an early-morning jolt to bring home the need for an up-to-date earthquake survival kit. This morning's magnitude 4.4 earthquake was a good reminder for Southern Californians that they need to be prepared. What should you have in your earthquake emergency kit? The essentials include a flashlight, a portable radio and a first-aid kit. And of course you need instant, dry and canned food (and a can opener) and plenty of water. And don't forget blankets, extra clothing and sturdy shoes, as well as personal hygiene items.
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