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Survival Rate

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NEWS
October 5, 1987 | Associated Press
The survival rate for AIDS patients is worse than official figures suggest, with up to 98% of victims succumbing less than three years after diagnosis, a researcher said today. The official tally of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta shows that about 15% of AIDS victims will live longer than three years. But a detailed examination of long-term survivors suggests that only 2% to 5% may hang on that long, said Ann Hardy of the CDC.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Joseph Serna
Aviation experts and authorities say they are baffled at how a teen stowaway survived a 5-1/2-hour flight from California to Hawaii in a jetliner wheel well and appeared to emerge unscathed. Stowing away in a plane wheel well does not usually end well, experts say. Those who do so may fall to their deaths, be crushed by the landing gear or succumb to cold and lack of oxygen. Federal Aviation Administration records show that of the 105 people known to have stowed away on flights around the world over the last 67 years, only 25 lived through the ordeal, a survival rate of 23.8%.
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BUSINESS
October 14, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
Edwards Lifesciences Corp.'s minimally invasive heart valve kept 94% of patients alive a month after surgery, the best results yet for a technology that may grow into a $1.3-billion market for medical device makers. The death rate was half that in past studies of Sapien, a $30,000 valve that can be implanted without open-heart surgery. In another trial, closely held CoreValve Inc. reported a 93% survival rate after 30 days for its device.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
An intense nationwide push to speed hospital treatment for heart attack patients has been a success, cutting by 20% the average time people waited before getting their clogged arteries opened between 2005 and 2009. But in a twist cardiologists called "disappointing," the improvement did not translate into lower death rates, according to a study  published in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. "We had hoped this would make a huge difference, and it hasn't," said study senior author Dr. Hitinder Gurm, an interventional cardiologist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
French doctors report in today's New England Journal of Medicine that adding the drug cytarabine to a mix of two others can improve the survival rate for patients suffering from chronic myelogenous leukemia, a blood cancer that typically afflicts mature adults. Chronic myelogenous leukemia, or CML, strikes about one out of every 50,000 Americans annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2001
EVANGELIST GRAYLON A. FREEMAN Church of Christ, Cypress The marriage survival rate for infidelity across the board is very low. Marriage at its best is a fragile undertaking. It is a relationship that is built upon trust and commitment, a concern and a devotion that is to be life-lasting. The vows of a marriage--to honor one above all others--is not just made between a man and a woman, but it is also a covenant made with God.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the more than 30 years since they were first performed, organ transplants have become highly successful procedures, with patients' survival rates for the most popular type--kidney transplants--as high as 93% one year after surgery, according to a major national study. For transplants other than kidneys, the one-year survival rate for patients is nearly as encouraging: 88.7% for pancreas, 82.1% for heart, 74.4% for liver, 53.3% for heart-lung and 53.9% for lung, the study said.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, Los Angeles Times
Pancreatic cancer, the most aggressive type of cancer, has claimed the life of astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. Ride died Monday at age of 61 after a 17-month-long battle against the disease. Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths for people in the United States. It has the lowest survival rate of any type of cancer - according to the American Cancer Society, the one-year survival rate is 20% for all stages of pancreatic cancer combined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Joseph Serna
Aviation experts and authorities say they are baffled at how a teen stowaway survived a 5-1/2-hour flight from California to Hawaii in a jetliner wheel well and appeared to emerge unscathed. Stowing away in a plane wheel well does not usually end well, experts say. Those who do so may fall to their deaths, be crushed by the landing gear or succumb to cold and lack of oxygen. Federal Aviation Administration records show that of the 105 people known to have stowed away on flights around the world over the last 67 years, only 25 lived through the ordeal, a survival rate of 23.8%.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, Los Angeles Times
Pancreatic cancer, the most aggressive type of cancer, has claimed the life of astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. Ride died Monday at age of 61 after a 17-month-long battle against the disease. Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths for people in the United States. It has the lowest survival rate of any type of cancer - according to the American Cancer Society, the one-year survival rate is 20% for all stages of pancreatic cancer combined.
HEALTH
June 6, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Two new drugs can significantly increase survival in patients with metastatic melanoma, the advanced and generally lethal form of skin cancer, researchers reported. Results were so dramatic in a trial of one of the drugs that the study was halted early, researchers reported Sunday at a Chicago meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Studies on both drugs were published online by the New England Journal of Medicine. Melanoma is among the most common cancers in the United States.
NEWS
May 11, 2011
Skin cancer: A May 9 article in the Health section about the different types of skin cancers described invasive melanoma as melanoma that had traveled to other parts of the body. Invasive melanoma means the cancer has spread beyond the epidermis of the skin into deeper tissues (e.g. dermis or subcutaneous fat) but not necessarily to other parts of the body. The article also said that the five-year survival rate for invasive melanoma is 15%. That statistic is for metastatic melanoma, in which the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.
HEALTH
February 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Some women with early-stage breast cancer may be cured without the need to remove multiple lymph nodes, which has been the standard practice, researchers reported Tuesday. Breast cancer surgery traditionally includes removal of lymph nodes near the tumor so that doctors can check for evidence that the cancer has spread. However, a new study found that people with early-stage breast cancer that has spread to a nearby lymph node fared just as well after treatment without the removal of additional lymph nodes in the armpit area.
HEALTH
December 10, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
A class of drugs that has been increasingly used to treat breast cancer in recent years may not improve survival rates in younger women with the disease, researchers reported Thursday. The medications ? bone-building drugs called bisphosphonates ? have generated enthusiasm among cancer researchers because of their potential to slow the growth of cancer cells in bone and improve bone strength. But a large study on a potent bisphosphonate called zoledronic acid, or Zometa, found that the drug did not improve survival for patients with early stage breast cancer except among a subset of women who were five or more years past menopause.
SCIENCE
August 31, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Preemptive removal of breasts or ovaries in women with two common breast cancer genes can sharply reduce the risk of contracting cancer and dying, even if a woman has already been diagnosed with breast cancer, a new study confirms. Researchers were already confident that such prophylactic surgeries reduce the risk of cancer, but the new study , reported Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., is the largest such investigation to date and the first to differentiate the benefits based on which gene a woman has and whether or not she has already had cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1995
Your article "The Disease Men Try to Ignore" (Jan. 2) contains some unfortunate errors of fact concerning treatment of prostate cancer with radiation therapy as an alternative to radical prostatectomy. The first is the assertion that "most studies have found a five-year survival rate of about 20%." Any comparison of survival rates between the two treatment options must be based on patients with similar stages of disease, and when this is done, there is no demonstrable difference in survival between patients treated with surgery or radiation therapy.
NEWS
May 11, 2011
Skin cancer: A May 9 article in the Health section about the different types of skin cancers described invasive melanoma as melanoma that had traveled to other parts of the body. Invasive melanoma means the cancer has spread beyond the epidermis of the skin into deeper tissues (e.g. dermis or subcutaneous fat) but not necessarily to other parts of the body. The article also said that the five-year survival rate for invasive melanoma is 15%. That statistic is for metastatic melanoma, in which the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.
NEWS
July 27, 2010
About three-quarters of men with low-risk prostate tumors that can safely be ignored for months or years receive aggressive treatment, despite the risk of complications, researchers reported Monday. The findings, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, shed further light on the ongoing dispute about the levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) that should be used to trigger further diagnosis and treatment. Currently, a cutoff of PSA levels of 4.0 nanograms per milliliter is used to decide whether a man needs a biopsy or other follow-up, but some experts are recommending the cutoff be reduced to 2.5. If that were to occur, the authors report, the number of U.S. men considered to have abnormal PSA levels would double to about 6 million, and many more would undergo unnecessary procedures.
OPINION
January 28, 2010 | Meghan Daum
Imissed much of the healthcare debate last year. I missed a lot of things, actually, because I was largely preoccupied with my terminally ill mother. She was diagnosed with stage four gallbladder cancer late last January and died at age 67, in her apartment in New York, the day after Christmas. That she lived 11 months is considered a success by her oncologists, less because those months were marked by anything resembling a good quality of life (they weren't) but because the average survival time for someone in her predicament is generally half that.
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