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NATIONAL
February 8, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
The American Redoubt: It lies in the rural high country of Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, eastern Washington and Oregon. For a growing number of people, it's the designated point of retreat when the American economy hits the fan. When banks fail, the government declares martial law, the power grid goes down. When warming oceans flood the coasts and a resurgent Russia takes out targets on the Eastern Seaboard. Though white separatists for years have called for a racial homeland in the inland Pacific Northwest, an even bigger movement of survivalists, Christian fundamentalists and political doomsayers is fueling the idea of a defensible retreat in the high country west of the Rockies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
The apocalypse is no place for wimps. Whiners, on the other hand, are generously accommodated in Denis Henry Hennelly's "Goodbye World," an unconvincing, poorly conceived hybrid of end-of-the-world thriller and relationship drama. The collapse of this civilization arrives via text message; the words "Goodbye World" prelude the sudden breakdown of all technological infrastructure. The stockpiles of food that survivalist James (Adrian Grenier) had hoarded in his off-the-grid cottage can feed his wife, Lily (Kerry Bishé)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two men suspected of robbing nine banks in the San Fernando Valley were survivalists who maintained a gun vault in their West Hills house containing 119 firearms and 25,000 rounds of ammunition, authorities said Saturday. One of the robberies they are suspected of committing was the largest in Los Angeles history, Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates said.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
For years, he has menaced the isolated cabins that dot the mountains of southern Utah. Residents thought of him as some sort of Bogey Man, an off-kilter survivalist who broke into dozens of unattended homesteads, leaving behind handwritten threats and bullet holes. He became know as the Mountain Man, whose wilderness skills were compared to those of explorer Davy Crockett. And now he's behind bars. Authorities arrested Troy James Knapp this week in an isolated mountain region in central Utah, ending a five-year-long manhunt that frustrated sheriffs in three counties.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As far as hiding places go, this rough-hewn land of remote caves, deep twisting canyons and impenetrable underbrush is as good a place as any to hide. This is where three modern-day desperadoes went to ground, in the rugged badlands of the Four Corners. This is where an eruption of violence on a spring day brought back memories of the region's bloody past: shootouts with lawmen, a frantic chase by a posse and a careening escape across the desert and into the wild.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2000 | RASMI SIMHAN, BALTIMORE SUN
Who will survive? Should we care? Outdoors experts and show fans alike talk about what makes the CBS series "Survivor" a study of human nature, and why we shouldn't try the participants' wilderness tricks at home. "Mountain" Mel Deweese, a survivalist. On choosing "Survivor" participants: "They're like the Seven Dwarfs--Sleepy, Dopey and Grumpy put under stress without food, fire, water or shelter. They don't want 16 of us [survivalists].
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1995 | GEOFF BOUCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Five minutes into the interview, Jim Benson's eyes locked onto the tape recorder. Perhaps the whirl of the machine's gently spinning wheels reminded the editor of American Survival Guide that it is a touchy time to be a spokesman for survivalists and their strident brethren in militias. "You got that thing rolling, by the way? I don't have any problem with it if . . . uh, is it running right now? That's no problem . . . uh, I'm not the best person at being, uh, real diplomatic. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1995
So you're partial to semiautomatic guns, camouflage and storing massive amounts of canned goods in preparation for the apocalypse. But looking around your home, you realize the gun-rack clashes with the battlefield green and those K-ration labels don't go with anything. What to do? The Long Beach Convention Center can help out the most ardent survivalist and home decorator this weekend with two very different conventions.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Escaped convict Danny Ray Horning kidnaped two women Saturday morning and drove out of Grand Canyon National Park in their rental car, managing to foil roadblocks and the surveillance of more than 300 law enforcement officers, park police reported. By late afternoon, Horning had left the women tied to a tree, crashed their car and taken off on foot--with officers in pursuit--wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with "Fun Run."
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the dark and brooding mountains covering the long panhandle of northern Idaho, Randy Weaver--survivalist, racist and fugitive from the law--chose his fortress well. For decades, a variety of radicals, survivalists, criminals, white supremacists and religious zealots on the furthest fringe of society have sought refuge in the isolated cabins deep in the Douglas fir forests.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Frankly, it sounded pretty stupid. For reasons unknown, electricity fails worldwide, sending humanity into a post-technological free-fall. Weeds grow in the Capitol (very "Logan's Run"), young women defend their families with bows and arrows (very "Hunger Games"), and no one seems to remember that people made ice cream and bullets long before electricity was harnessed as a personal power source. But NBC's "Revolution" surprised everyone; not only was it good, it was a hit. Big Concept shows are always a gamble; too often creators pick the wrong big concept - dinosaurs, say, or a remake of "V. " "Revolution," through insight or sheer luck, struck thematic gold, mining the vein running through our collective unconscious: Where once we feared corruption, we now fear collapse, a technological, social or political cataclysm that will Change Everything.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE -- It was a bunker for one that survivalist Peter Keller built deep in a forested hillside in Washington state, according to police who have closely examined the elaborate shelter where Keller retreated after killing his wife and teenage daughter. “He had pulleys that he would use to move timber. From what I understand, it was three levels. It was reinforced by logs which it appeared as though he hand cut and debarked. It was almost like a log cabin underground,” Sgt. Cindi West of the King County Sheriff's Department told The Times on Tuesday.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
The American Redoubt: It lies in the rural high country of Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, eastern Washington and Oregon. For a growing number of people, it's the designated point of retreat when the American economy hits the fan. When banks fail, the government declares martial law, the power grid goes down. When warming oceans flood the coasts and a resurgent Russia takes out targets on the Eastern Seaboard. Though white separatists for years have called for a racial homeland in the inland Pacific Northwest, an even bigger movement of survivalists, Christian fundamentalists and political doomsayers is fueling the idea of a defensible retreat in the high country west of the Rockies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
There are years that are remembered for changing the course of human history:1492. 1776. 1945. Then there are years that were predicted to change the course of history. 1844, when Judgment Day didn't materialize. 1910, when Halley's Comet didn't wipe out humanity. And remember Y2K? But rarely does a year arrive with such a mixture of anticipation and dread as 2012. We speak not of the presidential campaign but of the Maya calendar, and the projection that it — or, more accurately, a cycle within it — will end on Dec. 21, 2012.
REAL ESTATE
June 17, 2007 | Ann Brenoff, Times Staff Writer
Wanted: One survivalist with 11 friends and a checkbook. A 25-acre island in the Bahamas, which was developed as a secure sanctuary capable of sustaining 12 people with no outside contact for five years, will be auctioned on June 28. Expected sales price: $14 million. Leaf Cay Exuma was bought about 25 years ago by Jack N. Holcomb for the purpose of ...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2004 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
When Trudy Sherburne returned to her desert home near Victorville after a short trip on Easter weekend in 1998, she thought her house was on fire. Government vehicles with flashing lights surrounded the place. She quickly realized her mistake. The house was being raided.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
God knows what Tim Robbins and the Actors' Gang had in mind when they started to work on a new piece for the Angels Flight series at MOCA six weeks ago. Maybe just a title--"Carnage: Final Assembly." Whatever the aim, they have come up with something. This is more than a piece. It's a play, as rude and as mocking as something that Aristophanes might have knocked off, if you can imagine Aristophanes taking on America's TV preachers and survivalists. In fact, that's not too hard to imagine.
NEWS
April 4, 1999 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it weren't for the bug, F. Paul Haag could really savor the view: icy trees, misted hilltops, a fish-filled lake at his land's edge. But the bug is too present in the 53-year-old computer consultant's thoughts. It keeps him busy filling propane tanks, installing generators, amassing enough grain to feed a family for two years. The bug isn't anything endemic to this swath of the South. It's the Y2K programming glitch preoccupying computer technicians and many others as 2000 approaches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2001 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Butte County sheriff's deputies who were involved in a gun battle at a remote mountain cabin were found dead, along with the suspected gunman. The gunman, Richard Gerald Bracklow, 46, had kept a cache of weapons in the cabin and was described by neighbors as a survivalist. The slain sheriff's deputies were identified as Lt. Leonard Estes, 61, a 30-year veteran of the force, and Deputy William Hunter, 26, who joined the department in 1998. The incident began about 5 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2000 | RASMI SIMHAN, BALTIMORE SUN
Who will survive? Should we care? Outdoors experts and show fans alike talk about what makes the CBS series "Survivor" a study of human nature, and why we shouldn't try the participants' wilderness tricks at home. "Mountain" Mel Deweese, a survivalist. On choosing "Survivor" participants: "They're like the Seven Dwarfs--Sleepy, Dopey and Grumpy put under stress without food, fire, water or shelter. They don't want 16 of us [survivalists].
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