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Survivor Benefits

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BUSINESS
March 19, 2013 | By Shan Li
The U.S. government is paying billions to war veterans and their families, including monthly payments to the children of Civil War veterans. More than $40 billion annually is being paid out to soldiers and survivors of the Civil War, the Spanish-American War in 1898, both World Wars, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, the Iraq war and the war in Afghanistan, according to an analysis by the Associated Press. Two children of Civil War veterans -- one in Tennessee and the other in North Carolina -- are each receiving $876 a year.
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NATIONAL
August 16, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
TUCSON - Business owners Dave Michelson and Matt Brassard remember the outpouring of support and dollars when they held a fundraiser in Prescott for people whose houses were damaged in the Yarnell Hill fire and the survivors of the 19 firefighters who died fighting the blaze. The community was unified in grief, Brassard said. "It was amazing, the amount of people who came out in support," he added. Now, a conflict over whether to extend full survivors' benefits to the families of 13 firefighters killed on the job June 30 looms over Prescott, creating an uneasiness in the community.
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NEWS
January 17, 1996 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supporting Gov. Pete Wilson, the Assembly on Tuesday upheld his veto of a bill that would have allowed surviving spouses of most local public employees, including police officers killed in the line of duty, to keep collecting death benefits if they remarry. Despite emotional testimony and the presence of more than half a dozen widows of slain peace officers, an evenly divided Assembly voted 38 to 38 to override Wilson's veto of the so-called Fairness for Families bill.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2013 | By Shan Li
The U.S. government is paying billions to war veterans and their families, including monthly payments to the children of Civil War veterans. More than $40 billion annually is being paid out to soldiers and survivors of the Civil War, the Spanish-American War in 1898, both World Wars, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, the Iraq war and the war in Afghanistan, according to an analysis by the Associated Press. Two children of Civil War veterans -- one in Tennessee and the other in North Carolina -- are each receiving $876 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1987 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
A child is entitled to survivors' Social Security benefits after the death of the father, even though he died before marrying the mother or learning of the pregnancy, a federal appellate court decided Monday in an Orange County case. The decision, which suggested that some legal distinctions based on illegitimacy may be unconstitutional, provides retroactive benefits for Ariana Smith, 4, of Laguna Niguel.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2011 | Kathy M. Kristof, Personal Finance
Consider this: Roughly half of the people who get married in the United States will end up divorced. And Social Security is the primary source of income for 72% of unmarried retirees, many of whom are single because they're divorced. Unfortunately, few financial advisors put those two facts together and focus on how divorce, as well as re-marriage, can affect retirement planning, said Rob Kron, head of advisor education initiatives at the New York-based investment firm BlackRock.
NATIONAL
May 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
President Bush's preferred approach for Social Security would mean smaller survivor benefits for middle- and upper-income children and widows than they are now promised, a top administration official said Wednesday. At the same time, Bush envisions no changes in the benefit system for the disabled, said Allan Hubbard, chairman of the National Economic Council and the administration's point man on Social Security.
NEWS
September 16, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the many cruel ironies buried in the stories of those killed, injured or missing in Tuesday's attacks, there is this twist: At least four of those killed when American Airlines Flight 77 plowed into the Pentagon were attending a meeting to discuss ways to improve the system for getting survivor benefits to family members of military personnel. Gerald P. Fisher, Terence M. Lynch and Ernest M.
OPINION
March 22, 2012
The Supreme Court heard arguments Monday in a case titled Astrue vs. Capato, but a better name for it might be "In re: Brave New World. " Karen Capato, who conceived twins through artificial insemination after their biological father died, asked the justices to overrule the Social Security Administration and hold that the children are entitled to survivor benefits. As JusticeSamuel A. Alito Jr.pointed out, the authors of the Social Security Act "never had any inkling about the situation that has arisen in this case.
NEWS
March 12, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 4 1/2-year-old girl conceived through artificial insemination after her father's death was awarded Social Security survivor benefits. Commissioner Shirley Sears Chater agreed to $700 a month for Judith Hart, averting a federal court battle against the little girl's mother, Nancy Hart of the New Orleans suburb of Slidell.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2013 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
SANFORD, N.C. - Ashley Broadway and Army Lt. Col. Heather Mack have been a couple for 15 years. Broadway attended every one of Mack's promotion ceremonies. The two lived together when Mack served on bases in Texas and Kansas. When Mack was deployed to South Korea, Broadway joined her there. She cared for their young son, Carson, when Mack was sent to Kuwait. On Nov. 10, the women legally married in Washington, D.C. Broadway began a new life as a military spouse, certain that with the repeal in 2011 of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy that banned gays from serving openly, she would enjoy the same rights as other spouses.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A widow who conceived a baby from the sperm of her late husband is not automatically entitled to Social Security survivors benefits to help raise the child, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. The 9-0 decision rejected the claim that a biological child of a married couple, even one born years after the father died, always qualifies as his survivor under the Social Security Act. Instead, the justices upheld the government's multi-part definition of who deserves survivors benefits.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2012 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: Our mother just turned 64, and our father is divorcing her. She hasn't worked in years because of significant physical and mental health issues. My sister and I have been trying to figure out how she's going to survive on $750 a month, which is the equivalent of half his Social Security. She has always had serious issues with money management, which is why there are no retirement savings or a house. We are now about to embark on the maze of social service benefits that an older woman below the poverty line can receive, partly so we can decide whether she's better off staying put where she is in Arkansas, moving to my sister's in Texas, moving to be near me in Maryland, or moving to her childhood home of Chicago, where most of her friends are. For a lot of complicated reasons (mostly related to the mental health issues)
OPINION
March 22, 2012
The Supreme Court heard arguments Monday in a case titled Astrue vs. Capato, but a better name for it might be "In re: Brave New World. " Karen Capato, who conceived twins through artificial insemination after their biological father died, asked the justices to overrule the Social Security Administration and hold that the children are entitled to survivor benefits. As JusticeSamuel A. Alito Jr.pointed out, the authors of the Social Security Act "never had any inkling about the situation that has arisen in this case.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court justices struggled with applying an "old law to new technology" in a case that asks whether children whose father died before they were born or even conceived are entitled to survivors benefits under the Social Security law. The justices heard the case of Karen Capato, a New Jersey mother who in September 2003 gave birth to twins through in vitro fertilization 18 months after her husband, Robert, had died of cancer in Florida....
NATIONAL
November 15, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court agreed to decide whether a child conceived through in vitro fertilization after a father's death was entitled to a Social Security survivor's benefit. At least 100 such claims are pending at the Social Security Administration while officials try to resolve how the Depression-era law should be interpreted in an era of modern reproductive technology. Since 1939, the Social Security system has provided a benefit to the family of a deceased wage earner, including his children.
OPINION
November 30, 2002
A better headline for "Shifting Gears to Become a Teacher" (Nov. 22) would be "Shifting Gears to Lose Your Social Security Benefits." People thinking about making a midcareer change to teaching should be aware that current Social Security laws will take away much of their earned Social Security benefits when they retire from their second career of teaching. Retired California teachers also lose their Social Security survivor benefits. Private-sector workers collect both their private pensions and Social Security in full.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2011 | Kathy M. Kristof, Personal Finance
Consider this: Roughly half of the people who get married in the United States will end up divorced. And Social Security is the primary source of income for 72% of unmarried retirees, many of whom are single because they're divorced. Unfortunately, few financial advisors put those two facts together and focus on how divorce, as well as re-marriage, can affect retirement planning, said Rob Kron, head of advisor education initiatives at the New York-based investment firm BlackRock.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2010 | By Ruben Vives
State and local officials joined hundreds of people outside the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center in Hollywood on Sunday morning to kick off a national grass-roots campaign demanding equal Social Security benefits for same-sex couples. The rally and march -- dubbed Rock for Equality -- was put together by the center and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force in conjunction with the Aids Community Action Foundation, said Jim Key, a spokesman for the center. At the rally, Rep. Linda T. Sanchez (D-Lakewood)
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