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Survivor Television Program

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NEWS
January 22, 2001 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just when you thought reality shows couldn't get any raunchier, a quintet of randy thirtysomething entrepreneurs took the "Big Brother"/"Survivor" concept where no network has dared to go: into a house full of porn stars. Steve Fine, Joey D'Amore and three buddies were sitting around watching "Survivor" last summer when they realized they were bored.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2009 | Maria Elena Fernandez
"Survivor" is living up to its name. CBS announced Thursday that it had renewed the reality show for two more seasons -- its 19th and 20th editions. And host Jeff Probst, who won an Emmy last fall for his work on the show, will continue his duties. The renewal should not come as a surprise: "Survivor" continues to win its 8 p.m. Thursday time period in all key demographics. -- Maria Elena Fernandez
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colleen Haskell doesn't have any grand master life plan. "I am just collecting stories in life," says the peppy 24-year-old who came to fame last summer on the first edition of CBS' "Survivor." "I fell into 'Survivor' and I fell into this," she says. "This" is a starring role in the new raucous Rob Schneider comedy, "The Animal," which opens June 1.
NEWS
June 11, 2008 | Christy Grosz
WE'RE on a first-name basis with them: Tyra is fierce, and Ty wipes tears even as he swings a hammer. Their accessories are iconic: Howie's got models with briefcases, and Jeff presides over fifth-graders. And then there are those signature lines: Padma doles a gentle blow ("Please pack your knives and go"), while Heidi's kiss-off is less than sweet ("You're out."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Survivor" wasn't bad, but I would have done more to humiliate Sonja, the first of the competitors to be booted from the island. She didn't bawl and didn't even know how to be a bad loser. "Go get 'em, you guys," she generously told her seven companions after they voted her out, 4 to 3. How pathetic was that.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2000 | RANDY DOTINGA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though "Hollywood Squares" hasn't come calling yet, there's no doubt that San Diego psychologist Gene Ondrusek is a man in demand. The morning news shows on CBS and NBC and dozens of radio disc jockeys clamored to interview him over the summer, and his name appeared in such publications as the New York Times and Entertainment Weekly. A new Fox series called "Love Cruise" put him to work behind the scenes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2001 | Howard Rosenberg
The slaughter of a wild pig for food on the Feb. 15 episode of "Survivor: The Australian Outback" is drawing outrage from animal rights groups. "Taking a life for crass entertainment is wrong," Gretchen Wyler, president of the Ark Trust in Los Angeles, said this week. She added: "Killing for titillation is wrong. Killing for ratings is wrong." And killing for food is wrong, some of us believe. Although Wyler's logic is unassailable, I'm of two minds about the "Survivor" episode.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2001 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was Harold Greene, anchor of the KCBS-TV 11 p.m. "news," who alerted me to the situation. This was Tuesday night, and "The Station of the People" had just finished a segment on how "Survivor" castoff Jerri Manthey's star was rising in Hollywood. (As proof, she's appearing in a production of the play "Lady Macbeth Gets a Divorce" at the Beverly Hills Playhouse.) After the piece, co-anchor Gretchen Carr read a teaser for Thursday night's "Survivor" finale.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
Richard Hatch, the first winner of CBS' "Survivor," said Friday he thought the network was responsible for paying the taxes on his $1-million prize and that's why he didn't pay them. He told an interviewer he was "absolutely not guilty." Prosecutors have charged Hatch with filing false 2000 and 2001 tax returns, omitting his income from the reality show, as well as $321,000 he was paid by a Boston radio station. Hatch, who lives in Newport, R.I.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2002 | Greg Braxton
The final installment of CBS' unscripted series "Survivor: Thailand" conquered its competition Thursday night, beating the other three major networks combined both in audience size and key demographics, according to figures released Friday by Nielsen Media Research. The two-hour installment was watched by more than 24 million viewers. Still, that was about 1 million fewer than tuned in for the finale of "Survivor: Marquesas" last May.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Denise Martin, who gained fame as the lunch lady on CBS' reality show "Survivor: China," is donating the $50,000 she received from producer Mark Burnett to the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation. Martin told viewers on Sunday night's live finale that she'd been demoted to janitor at a school in Douglas, Mass., after finishing fourth on the show. After hearing her story, Burnett surprised Martin with the money to help get her life back.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A school lunch lady who gained fame as a contestant on CBS' reality show "Survivor: China" wasn't telling the truth when she claimed during Sunday's season finale that she'd been demoted to janitor, her boss says. Denise Martin of Douglas, Mass., finished fourth in the competition, missing out on the $1-million grand prize. "They didn't give me my job back," Martin, 40, said during the live broadcast. "I'm a janitor now. I clean the toilets. I wash the floors in the bathrooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2006 | Jon Caramanica, Special to The Times
On Thursday night, following a protracted battle with negative press, the continued indifference of participating contestants and a presumed bout of soul-searching, CBS brought the grand race experiment on this season's "Survivor" to an abrupt, unsatisfying end. It was one week old (three weeks in TV time). Not halfway into the season's third episode, the show's race-based tribes were dissolved, with no preceding fanfare, and no explanation.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2006 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
The president of the NAACP, who is also a CBS Corp. board member, said Tuesday that this season's premise for the broadcaster's hit series "Survivor" -- separating contestants by race -- was "a bad idea." But Bruce Gordon added that a resulting furor about the concept had gotten out of hand, and was out of proportion to the show's significance amid more important issues facing minorities, both in the entertainment arena and in society at large.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2006 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
"Survivor" host Jeff Probst on Thursday aggressively defended this season's twist of initially dividing teams along racial and ethnic lines, denying that controversy over the concept had caused several prominent sponsors, including General Motors, to drop out of the series. In a media conference call promoting the Sept. 14 season launch of "Survivor" on CBS, Probst said he understood the initial discomfort by politicians and others who have criticized this season's format.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2006 | From the Associated Press
General Motors Corp. has ended its sponsorship of CBS' hit series "Survivor," but the world's largest automaker said Wednesday that the decision had nothing to do with the reality show's decision to divide its contestants by race and ethnicity. GM spokeswoman Ryndee S. Carney said the company made the decision in the normal course of making its media buys months ago, before the show made its announcement. "I think it's just a coincidence. I know it's not cause and effect," Carney said.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2006 | From the Associated Press
General Motors Corp. has ended its sponsorship of CBS' hit series "Survivor," but the world's largest automaker said Wednesday that the decision had nothing to do with the reality show's decision to divide its contestants by race and ethnicity. GM spokeswoman Ryndee S. Carney said the company made the decision in the normal course of making its media buys months ago, before the show made its announcement. "I think it's just a coincidence. I know it's not cause and effect," Carney said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A former winner on "Survivor" has been suspended 20 days from his job with the Ohio Department of Transportation after an investigation concluded he took an unauthorized leave of absence. State investigators said Chris Daugherty of South Vienna, Ohio, used a bogus medical excuse to leave work for a month last fall to attend a promotional tour for the CBS reality TV show in Europe.
NEWS
August 24, 2006 | From the Associated Press
In what CBS is billing as an effort to increase diversity in the prime-time lineup, the new season of "Survivor" will be a race among races. At the start of the reality show's 13th edition, "Survivor: Cook Islands," 20 contestants will be organized into four tribes divided along ethnic lines -- black, white, Latino and Asian, CBS announced Wednesday. The tribes, as usual, will merge later in the season, which premieres Sept. 14, the network said.
NEWS
July 6, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A winner of the reality show "Survivor" was arrested in Georgia on Wednesday after allegedly shooting a puppy with an arrow. Brian Heidik, 38, was released on bond after being charged with battery and cruelty to animals. During the bond hearing in Douglas County Magistrate Court, Heidik told a judge he thought the dog was a coyote that has been harassing his pets, WSB-TV reported on its website. "At about 3 a.m.
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