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Susan

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OPINION
April 7, 2013 | Susan Silk and Barry Goldman
When Susan had breast cancer, we heard a lot of lame remarks, but our favorite came from one of Susan's colleagues. She wanted, she needed, to visit Susan after the surgery, but Susan didn't feel like having visitors, and she said so. Her colleague's response? "This isn't just about you. " "It's not?" Susan wondered. "My breast cancer is not about me? It's about you?" The same theme came up again when our friend Katie had a brain aneurysm. She was in intensive care for a long time and finally got out and into a step-down unit.
ARTICLES BY DATE
IMAGE
April 19, 2014 | By Janet Kinosian, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Documentary filmmaker Susan Rockefeller's eponymous ocean-inspired jewelry line is filled with treasures inspired by an overworked sea. Sea creatures carefully crafted in gold, silver and precious gems are the tools she uses to spotlight the plight of our world's oceans. Married to fellow sea-lover and philanthropist David Rockefeller Jr. in 2008, she launched the jewelry line on World Ocean Day in 2012. Her pieces ($190 to $16,600) use natural-colored cultured freshwater Honora Ming pearls and recycled metals.
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HEALTH
May 11, 1998 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dibs on the TV set Wednesday night. The Nanny--Fran Drescher--and Mr. Sheffield--Charles Shaughnessy--are getting married on "The Nanny" (CBS). We've waited nearly six years for this wedding. Come 8 p.m., Poco (the cat) and I will be celebrating the hourlong show in fine viewer fashion: We'll unplug the phone, call a truce on the remote control, set two pillows and two bowls of popcorn on the floor--and none of that low-fat business, either.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Annalise Mantz
For Susan Straight and Lisa See, their novels are not just their stories. Both authors use their books to tell the stories of the invisible. In a conversation with Los Angeles Times columnist Patt Morrison on Saturday afternoon at the Festival of Books, the authors discussed their characters' place in history as well as their own. See's most recent book, “China Dolls,” tells the story of Chinese American nightclub performers “going out...
TRAVEL
November 11, 2001
Times Travel Writer Susan Spano is on assignment. The "Her World" column will return next week.
TRAVEL
May 28, 2000 | Susan Spano
Times Travel Writer Susan Spano is on assignment. The Her World column will return next week.
MAGAZINE
March 26, 1989
Congratulations, Susan. You've closed the gender gap. To be accepted in my aerobic class, I need only vanity. TOM ASHER Studio City
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The suspense is laboriously built up in the Geffen Playhouse production of "Wait Until Dark," a freshly adapted version of Frederick Knott's 1966 play that gave rise a year later to the movie with Audrey Hepburn as a blind Greenwich Village pixie beset by nefarious shadows. But when the tension finally gets going late in the second half, it rips, momentarily reviving not just a dusty property but a theatrical genre. Alison Pill plays Susan, the young, victimized woman who lost her sight in a car accident and now must fend off some thuggish con men who have descended on her while her husband is away.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2011 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
If it seems too good to be true, it probably is. That's the moral of the story in "Bedbugs," a disturbing new novel by Ben H. Winters. The book chronicles the horrific events surrounding the Wendt family's move to a brownstone that is renting for an unbelievably low price in a trendy Brooklyn neighborhood. What appears idyllic soon turns into a creepy-crawly nightmare. The brownstone at 56 Cranberry St. is rented to the Wendts by a daffy old widow named Andrea Scharfstein, who lives on the ground floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | Susan Straight
What does it take to be a writer: A room of one's own? A weakness for words? To celebrate the Festival of Books, we asked five celebrated authors to recall a turning point in their evolution as writers. First up is Susan Straight, recipient of the Los Angeles Times Book Prizes' 2013 Robert Kirsch Award for lifetime achievement. I wrote the stories in my first book by hand, in these places: at the counter of the Mobil station where I worked in 1979, between customers, eating beef jerky and stale cashews out of the nut mix no one ever bought from the cloudy glass compartments beneath my notebook; sitting on a huge rock at the beach in Rosarito, Mexico, in 1983 after my husband fell asleep in the tiny hotel where we spent our two-night honeymoon, writing in my notebook; sitting at a card table in married student housing in 1984 in Amherst with the small blue Smith-Corona my mother had given me for high school graduation; in a pale green 1980-something Fiat with brakes that went out all the time, upon which occasion my husband would have me sit in the driver's seat and pump the brakes while he was underneath the car in the gravel driveway of our house back in Riverside in 1988, and I held a notebook and pen, writing.
OPINION
March 13, 2014 | Meghan Daum
Remember "the Princeton Mom," who made a pariah of herself last year when she exhorted marriage-minded college women not to graduate without securing future husbands along with their diplomas? She's back in the media gestalt. She's back in the way that people often come back after they make such splashes, with a book that didn't need to be written, though you can't really blame them for writing it (when you're an Internet scourge, you might as well take a publisher's money and run). Susan Patton is her name, and the book, "Marry Smart," is essentially a 200-plus page version of a letter, printed in the Princeton student newspaper, that started it all . In it, Patton inveighed against female students who were too busy thinking about their studies and their careers to look for future husbands among their classmates: "You will never again have this concentration of men who are worthy of you," she wrote.
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Kavita Daswani
A slab of monkeypod wood with a bronze heart embedded in its surface hangs from the ceiling by two lengths of white-and-pale-gold marine rope at Creative Registry. Festooned from the rope are frothy tassels and braided Mylar - all the components artistically fused to make a fetching decorative garden swing. The handmade piece is a collaboration between Honolulu-based woodworker Kristen Brown and Susan Manrao, Los Angeles interior designer and founder of the new West Hollywood home decor showroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Eva Amurri Martino, the actress daughter of Susan Sarandon, is pregnant with her first child! “Having a family has always been a priority for us both and we couldn't be happier!,” the couple said in confirming the news to People . The baby's daddy is husband Kyle Martino, a former soccer star who married his gal in October 2011, with Sarandon and former partner Tim Robbins hosting the occasion. "Ecstatic bout the new addition to our tribe," Sarandon said on Twitter , posting a link to People's they're-expecting story.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Ellen Olivier
The event: Bruce Dern called Monday's shindig “the geezers' dinner” as he accepted his best actor award for “Nebraska” at the Movies for Grownups Awards Gala, staged by AARP . Nevertheless, stars packed the Beverly Wilshire Hotel, regardless of their generation, to celebrate movies relevant to mature audiences.  The honorees: Besides, Dern's award, Susan Sarandon picked up a lifetime achievement award, while director Steve McQueen...
BUSINESS
January 26, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
First, the cancer threatened Susan Braig's life, then it wrecked her finances. Now healthy at 64, Braig is worried about her future. Her primary income is the roughly $2,300 a month she gets from Social Security. Then there's her home-based business, which brings in an average of $750 a month from jewelry making and grant writing. Her savings total less than $29,000. "I'm one of those baby boomers who is now getting ready to face the next phase," Braig said. "I look at it and I just want to curl up in a fetal position.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The title is like that of an old-fashioned, pre-Sassy magazine: "Teen Girl." It's the latest of Justin Tanner's pop plays at the Cast Theatre.
MAGAZINE
June 4, 1989
I know I speak for all of Tabsh's patients when I proclaim that we have a healthy baby largely because of his herculean efforts. How can you ever thank someone enough for a healthy child? SUSAN CROSS Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
¡Feliz cumpleaños, Susan Sontag! The great critic, novelist and iconoclast was born Jan. 16, 1933. Today would've been her 81st birthday. Many readers associate Sontag with New York: She was born in the Big Apple and first made her name there as a critic in her late 20s. But we Angelenos know that Sontag, the author of 17 books that have been translated into 32 languages, is also one of our own. Long before she wrote her hugely influential "On...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Susan Rasky, an award-winning congressional correspondent who mentored a generation of young political journalists as a senior lecturer at UC Berkeley, died Sunday at her home in El Cerrito, Calif. She was 61 and had breast cancer. A graduate of Los Angeles' Fairfax High School and an alumna of Berkeley, Rasky was a familiar sight at California political events, wrestling an armload of papers and trailing a gaggle of students, whom she nudged to join in news conferences and panel discussions.
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