Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSusan Anderson
IN THE NEWS

Susan Anderson

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 9, 1995 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like most women who want to play competitive basketball after college, Susan Anderson had to leave the country after finding success at Texas. Now 26 and in her first--and only--season as The Master's women's basketball coach, Anderson was once a highly touted high school All-American center from Washington. After graduating from Mt. Baker High about 200 miles north of Seattle, she became a three-year starter at one of the nation's best Division I women's basketball programs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 9, 1995 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like most women who want to play competitive basketball after college, Susan Anderson had to leave the country after finding success at Texas. Now 26 and in her first--and only--season as The Master's women's basketball coach, Anderson was once a highly touted high school All-American center from Washington. After graduating from Mt. Baker High about 200 miles north of Seattle, she became a three-year starter at one of the nation's best Division I women's basketball programs.
Advertisement
OPINION
August 1, 1999
Susan Anderson's "Wealth With a Conscience" (Opinion, July 25) redefines the term "diversity" in a peculiar way, when she cites a company where the work force includes 60% African Americans, 35% Latinos and 5% whites as an example of "a dedication to diversity." ARTHUR M. COHEN Los Angeles
NEWS
March 2, 1986
I have always liked the series "Kung Fu" and was quite delighted with "Kung Fu: The Movie." I hope it was the pilot for a new series. I enjoyed David Carradine in "North and South" but prefer his quiet, gentle character of Caine in "Kung Fu." Susan M. Anderson, Costa Mesa
SPORTS
November 16, 1994 | BRYAN RODGERS
Susan Anderson makes her debut as The Master's College women's basketball coach when the Mustangs open the season today at 5:30 p.m. at home against Walla Walla (Wash.) College. Anderson, who played forward at the University of Texas, replaces Cliff McMannis, who directed the Mustangs to a 4-17 record in his only season as coach last year. Before coming to Master's, Anderson played for Athletes in Action in Brazil. In 1987, Texas advanced to the final four.
SPORTS
March 24, 1995
Ken Sugarman, a former men's basketball player at The Master's College, has been named coach of the women's basketball team at the school. Sugarman replaces Susan Anderson, who served as coach for one year. Anderson left Master's to plan for her marriage to Rogerio Soares, a senior forward on the men's team. Sugarman, who was an assistant coach at a high school in Washington, played at Master's in 1991.
SPORTS
April 9, 1994
Susan Anderson, a former All-Southwestern Conference basketball player for the University of Texas, has been named women's basketball coach at The Master's College. Anderson, who has been playing professionally in Brazil and Japan the past two years, replaces Cliff McManis, who resigned in March.
NEWS
December 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
On the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, Lewis P. Robinson stood on a dock at Pearl Harbor waiting for a boat to return him to the USS Arizona after an overnight shore leave. The clear blue skies suddenly darkened as a wave of Japanese planes descended, raining bombs on the harbor. Within minutes, blasts ripped open the 608-foot battleship Arizona, killing 1,177 crew members and sinking the ship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1990 | AMELIA CHAFFEE
English students at Santa Paula's continuation high school will do their writing on a word processor for the first time this year, thanks to a grant from a national writing program and matching funds from local businesses. Susan Anderson, English teacher at Renaissance High School, said she will receive $3,000 to buy a word processor and software from the Southern California Writing Project and Santa Paula companies.
NEWS
April 28, 1985 | BILL CURRY, Times Staff Writer
The dolls in Susan Anderson's back shop are firefighters and hikers, baseball players and ballerinas, Scouts and skiers, physicians and pretty girls dressed for parties, and their chins are all turned up, assertive and saying: "Glad to be alive." And they are all unmistakably handicapped. The Eagle Scout is an arm amputee, the skier has lost a leg, the pretty girl is blind and the baseball player has a leg brace.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|