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Susan Bonoff

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1995
How can a principal justify spending taxpayers' money to print flyers to recruit students from other public high schools? To add insult to injury, the same school plans to steal time which should be spent educating students and developing classroom instruction and curriculum and divert it to such self-serving interests as running tours for prospective new students. If there are over 3,000 empty seats in Valley high schools, why not close one school plant? The savings on just the administrative staff alone would be half a million dollars, not to mention the savings on maintenance, athletics and other school-based costs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Susan Bonoff, 58, a longtime college counselor at North Hollywood High who oversaw a college-awareness program credited with greatly increasing the school's graduation rate, died of acute leukemia May 25 at Kaiser Permanente Panorama City Medical Center, said her husband, Frank. In 1999, Bonoff secured a federal grant that enabled her to begin working with the class of 2005 when they were seventh-graders at Walter Reed Middle School in North Hollywood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1998
Re "An SOS for Our Students," editorial, March 30: For a number of years I have questioned the practice of the Cal State universities accepting many students who fail to meet their standards. If the CSUs do not feel these students are ready, they should not accept them. These students could attend a community college at a much lower cost to the students and the taxpayers. You mention that a student who is accepted by a Cal State by April of his senior year would still have time to take a preparatory course in a community college before enrolling at the CSU in September.
OPINION
December 14, 2002
Re "The Bad Side of 'B-Tracks' Criticized," Dec. 8: Finally, some media attention to the disparities that exist in three-track, year-round high schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District. The problems mentioned are real but are almost superficial in comparison with the major issue that failed to surface in the article. Track B students have unequal access to the curriculum and to graduation because of the placement of their intersession/remediation opportunities. In traditional schools, students have their summers to repeat failed classes before beginning their next school year.
NEWS
July 8, 2001
As the former college counselor at North Hollywood High School and the individual who held that position when the selection policy for valedictorian(s) was determined, I would like to respond to "Hail and Farewell to Valedictorians" (June 24). Prior to the LAUSD adopting a weighted grade-point average, or GPA, our valedictorians were always our straight-A students. After the weighted-GPA policy was enacted, we chose to continue honoring perfection. We have students in programs with some curricular options that might help a student gain a higher weighted GPA. In fairness, we decided all individuals who achieved perfection in every class would be honored as valedictorians rather than students who might rank mathematically higher due to one or more "bonused Bs."
OPINION
December 14, 2002
Re "The Bad Side of 'B-Tracks' Criticized," Dec. 8: Finally, some media attention to the disparities that exist in three-track, year-round high schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District. The problems mentioned are real but are almost superficial in comparison with the major issue that failed to surface in the article. Track B students have unequal access to the curriculum and to graduation because of the placement of their intersession/remediation opportunities. In traditional schools, students have their summers to repeat failed classes before beginning their next school year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1996
In response to your editorial "Ultimately, Students Pay the Price," Aug. 4, it is fair to say that you grossly misrepresented the process that occurred at North Hollywood High School. The leadership council, composed of students, teachers, parents and administrators, never chose to remain on a traditional calendar that might necessitate moving some neighborhood students to other schools. Quite the contrary, the group accepted the multitrack format (not realizing there were options) and worked tenaciously to develop a plan to assign students to each of the three tracks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Susan Bonoff, 58, a longtime college counselor at North Hollywood High who oversaw a college-awareness program credited with greatly increasing the school's graduation rate, died of acute leukemia May 25 at Kaiser Permanente Panorama City Medical Center, said her husband, Frank. In 1999, Bonoff secured a federal grant that enabled her to begin working with the class of 2005 when they were seventh-graders at Walter Reed Middle School in North Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
The North Hollywood High School Leadership Council will probably be asked to reconsider the track assignment for the school's highly gifted magnet students at a Monday afternoon meeting. The panel of parents, teachers and administrators is charged with deciding which students get which tracks on the year-round multitrack calendar. In July, North Hollywood joined at least three other Valley schools in adopting a staggered calendar for three groups of students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
A North Hollywood High School senior joined an elite group of 300 this week when he was named a semifinalist in the 55th annual Westinghouse Science Talent Search. Kevin Shapiro was recognized for his study of the little-explored role of a parasitic bacterium in the ecosystem. In an international science exchange program, he conducted his research last summer at the Russian Academy of Science at the Moscow State University Institute at Pushchino.
NEWS
July 8, 2001
As the former college counselor at North Hollywood High School and the individual who held that position when the selection policy for valedictorian(s) was determined, I would like to respond to "Hail and Farewell to Valedictorians" (June 24). Prior to the LAUSD adopting a weighted grade-point average, or GPA, our valedictorians were always our straight-A students. After the weighted-GPA policy was enacted, we chose to continue honoring perfection. We have students in programs with some curricular options that might help a student gain a higher weighted GPA. In fairness, we decided all individuals who achieved perfection in every class would be honored as valedictorians rather than students who might rank mathematically higher due to one or more "bonused Bs."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1998
Re "An SOS for Our Students," editorial, March 30: For a number of years I have questioned the practice of the Cal State universities accepting many students who fail to meet their standards. If the CSUs do not feel these students are ready, they should not accept them. These students could attend a community college at a much lower cost to the students and the taxpayers. You mention that a student who is accepted by a Cal State by April of his senior year would still have time to take a preparatory course in a community college before enrolling at the CSU in September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1996
In response to your editorial "Ultimately, Students Pay the Price," Aug. 4, it is fair to say that you grossly misrepresented the process that occurred at North Hollywood High School. The leadership council, composed of students, teachers, parents and administrators, never chose to remain on a traditional calendar that might necessitate moving some neighborhood students to other schools. Quite the contrary, the group accepted the multitrack format (not realizing there were options) and worked tenaciously to develop a plan to assign students to each of the three tracks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1995
How can a principal justify spending taxpayers' money to print flyers to recruit students from other public high schools? To add insult to injury, the same school plans to steal time which should be spent educating students and developing classroom instruction and curriculum and divert it to such self-serving interests as running tours for prospective new students. If there are over 3,000 empty seats in Valley high schools, why not close one school plant? The savings on just the administrative staff alone would be half a million dollars, not to mention the savings on maintenance, athletics and other school-based costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1996
Re "Testing on a Level Field," editorial, Oct. 3: Although I agree that too much emphasis is placed on standardized testing in the college admissions process, I must correct a major inaccuracy in your assumption. The selection index on the PSAT, which is used to determine National Merit Scholarship semifinalists, is derived by doubling the verbal score and adding it to the math score, thus giving twice as much weight to the verbal components of the test. To state that male students outscore female students due to their supposed superiority in math is incorrect and an obvious oversimplification.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
It's safe to say that Stephen Sorkin is a math-and-science kind of guy. The North Hollywood High School senior was captain of the school's Science Bowl team. He has helped Pasadena second-graders learn to use computers. He's set up computer networks for the Pasadena health department and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. And, of course, he was just selected one of 100 Tandy Technology Scholars nationwide.
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