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Susan Butcher

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NEWS
March 14, 1990 | From United Press International
Susan Butcher drove her inexperienced dog team across the finish line in record time today to win her fourth Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, covering the 1,161-mile distance in 11 days, 1 hour, 53 minutes and 23 seconds. Butcher, 35, of Manley, Alaska, drove her 11-dog team along Nome's Front Street to the cheers of onlookers about 11 a.m. and claimed the $50,000 top prize. She tied the record of four Iditarod victories held by Rick Swenson of Two Rivers, Alaska.
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OPINION
August 8, 2006
FOUR-TIME IDITAROD CHAMPION Susan Butcher, who died Saturday at 51 of leukemia, was the Lance Armstrong of dogsledding. For most of a decade she dominated the 1,150-mile race from Anchorage to Nome, inspiring T-shirts that read, "Alaska: Where Men Are Men, and Women Win the Iditarod." Even after she retired 12 years ago to start a family (she fretted at the time that, having named so many dogs, she'd never come up with names for children), she remained the face of dogsled racing.
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SPORTS
March 17, 1988 | Associated Press
Susan Butcher left the competition behind on the icy Bering Sea coast and mushed through bone-chilling winds Wednesday to score her third straight victory in the 1,150-mile Iditarod Trail sled dog race. Butcher, 33, collected a $30,000 first prize by urging her nine-dog team into the finish chute at 8:43 p.m., AST, several hours ahead of her closest rival in the 16th annual Anchorage-to-Nome trek. She had been on the trail for more than 11 days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2006 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Susan Butcher, the musher who won the grueling Iditarod sled dog race four times and helped fuel worldwide interest in Alaska's annual competition, has died. She was 51. Butcher died Saturday of leukemia at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. She had been diagnosed with the disease late last year. She underwent a stem cell transplant in May. For five years starting in 1986, Butcher virtually owned the 1,150-mile-plus sled dog race from Anchorage to Nome.
SPORTS
March 10, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Susan Butcher won $3,000 for being the first musher to reach the halfway point of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, but Martin Buser moved into the lead hours later. Butcher won the money by reaching the ghost town of Iditarod, from which the trail and race derive their names, at 9:45 p.m. Thursday night, two minutes ahead of Joe Runyan. Buser didn't arrive until two hours later, but he rested only 2 1/2 hours before pushing on for Shageluk, 540 miles from the finish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2006 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Susan Butcher, the musher who won the grueling Iditarod sled dog race four times and helped fuel worldwide interest in Alaska's annual competition, has died. She was 51. Butcher died Saturday of leukemia at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. She had been diagnosed with the disease late last year. She underwent a stem cell transplant in May. For five years starting in 1986, Butcher virtually owned the 1,150-mile-plus sled dog race from Anchorage to Nome.
SPORTS
May 6, 1992 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Butcher wanted no part of places like Los Angeles, and that was before the riots. Butcher, a four-time Iditarod champion, just doesn't care for big cities. Some must wonder if the dog musher from Alaska doesn't like people. Butcher, after all, packed her bags 19 years ago and moved from Colorado into the heart of the Alaskan wilderness. Her closest neighbor was 40 miles away; the closest road, 50 miles away. Winters were cold and harsh, with temperatures to 70 below and winds to 100 m.p.h.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a moment of warmth in a chilly, unyielding land. Twelve dozen Alaskan huskies yelped, growled, yipped and howled from their hutches on thawing muskeg and stretched wet paws toward Susan Butcher. Butcher returned the adoration. She chanted. "Bugga, bugga, buggabeen . . . the fastest dog there's ever been." Her song was for Sluggo, a honey-beige husky with a sore paw.
SPORTS
March 16, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Rick Swenson won the 1,163-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race for a record fifth time, taking advantage of a blizzard to beat four-time winner Susan Butcher.
SPORTS
March 3, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Norwegian-born Ketil Reitan was first into the checkpoint in Rainy Pass, Alaska, three days into the 1,159-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Forty-five minutes behind Reitan was Dee Dee Jonrowe, who was seven minutes ahead of Susan Butcher.
SPORTS
March 5, 1994 | PETE THOMAS
To put her situation last year into perspective for the mainstream sports fan, dog-musher Susan Butcher used a comparison: "In many ways, part of my job is being coach of nothing different than a football or basketball team, and last year I simply . . . had the Celtics--too many old ones and not enough young ones in there."
SPORTS
March 13, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Six days after the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race started, seven teams have emerged as clear leaders in the 1,161-mile event. Defending champion and race record-holder Martin Buser held the slim lead at Shageluk, the 15th of 27 checkpoints in the race to Nome. Behind Buser was Jeff King. Next were Rick Swenson, Susan Butcher, DeeDee Jonrowe, Rick Mackey and Tim Osmar.
SPORTS
May 6, 1992 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Butcher wanted no part of places like Los Angeles, and that was before the riots. Butcher, a four-time Iditarod champion, just doesn't care for big cities. Some must wonder if the dog musher from Alaska doesn't like people. Butcher, after all, packed her bags 19 years ago and moved from Colorado into the heart of the Alaskan wilderness. Her closest neighbor was 40 miles away; the closest road, 50 miles away. Winters were cold and harsh, with temperatures to 70 below and winds to 100 m.p.h.
SPORTS
March 3, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Norwegian-born Ketil Reitan was first into the checkpoint in Rainy Pass, Alaska, three days into the 1,159-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Forty-five minutes behind Reitan was Dee Dee Jonrowe, who was seven minutes ahead of Susan Butcher.
SPORTS
March 16, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Rick Swenson won the 1,163-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race for a record fifth time, taking advantage of a blizzard to beat four-time winner Susan Butcher.
SPORTS
March 14, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Four-time champion Susan Butcher was seven minutes ahead of her closest challenger as leaders in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race head for today's finish at Nome, Alaska. Butcher left Koyuk, an Eskimo village 992 miles into the 1,163-mile race, shortly before Martin Buser of Big Lake, Alaska. Rick Swenson, who like Butcher is seeking a record fifth victory, left Koyuk 17 minutes behind the leader. Tim Osmar, son of 1984 Iditarod champion Dean Osmar, was fourth.
SPORTS
March 13, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Four-time champion Susan Butcher broke away from a tight pack of mushers early Tuesday to push to the front of Alaska's Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Butcher was the first musher to reach Shaktoolik, an Eskimo village on the Bering Sea. Shaktoolik is 934 miles into the 1,163-mile race.
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