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Susan Collins

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NATIONAL
October 5, 2004 | Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writer
In the Senate, senior members who chair the most powerful committees long have been accustomed to having their way on the most important national security issues. But when Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) was looking for a senator to write legislation in response to the Sept. 11 commission's finding that the nation's spy agencies had failed to protect Americans from the terrorist attacks, he bypassed the Appropriations, Armed Services and Intelligence committees.
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NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Republicans have floated a lot of proposals for ending the government shutdown they instigated last week, but they've typically shared a fundamental flaw: They try to embarrass Democrats into signing on rather than offering something that Democrats actually want. By Wednesday, though, a handful of Republicans in the House and the Senate were circulating proposals with real sweeteners in them for their opposite numbers. They may not go far enough to bring the two sides together, but they raise an interesting question: Have Democrats left themselves room to accept anything short of complete capitulation by the GOP?
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NEWS
June 29, 1997 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High above the Senate floor, the lights shone brightly for the TV cameras. One by one, the 91 men and nine women made known their positions on a minor amendment in a roll-call vote. But the real action was taking place far from the spotlight. Around the corner, in a 19th century "American Renaissance" parlor, two junior senators huddled conspiratorially on an overstuffed, red leather couch. If campaign-finance reform is enacted by this Congress, the half-hour tete-a-tete between Sens. Russell D.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Negotiations on the centerpiece element of new gun control legislation appeared on the verge of a breakthrough Tuesday evening, with key lawmakers saying a final deal on expanding background checks for gun purchases could be reached Wednesday. “We're not there yet. We're closer than we've ever been,” Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said, as he stood with Sen. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.) after the two emerged from a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.)
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Negotiations on the centerpiece element of new gun control legislation appeared on the verge of a breakthrough Tuesday evening, with key lawmakers saying a final deal on expanding background checks for gun purchases could be reached Wednesday. “We're not there yet. We're closer than we've ever been,” Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said, as he stood with Sen. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.) after the two emerged from a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.)
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON -- Two moderate Republican senators joined in criticism of Susan Rice, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, after private meetings with her, in another setback for her hopes to be nominated as secretary of State. Sens. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) met with Rice on Wednesday afternoon at her request to discuss their concern that she had misled the public about the nature of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed four Americans.
NEWS
January 3, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For straying from Republican orthodoxy, they have been ostracized, berated and even punished by their conservative Senate colleagues. While promoting campaign finance reform, Susan Collins of Maine was never sure if any fellow Republicans would sit at her table during their weekly lunches. James M. Jeffords of Vermont felt their wrath while standing fast as the lone GOP sponsor of President Clinton's health care reform plan. For Maine's Olympia J.
NATIONAL
December 1, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
The Senate rejected competing measures to extend a payroll tax cut Thursday night, an outward display of partisanship as Republicans and Democrats moved behind the scenes to avert a $1,000 tax hike on American workers come Jan. 1. Both bills met with GOP opposition, illustrating deep resistance within the ranks despite party leaders' efforts to coalesce around the politically volatile issue. First, Republicans blocked President Obama's proposal to expand the payroll tax break to $1,500 for 2012 and extend it to employers who hire new workers, paying for it with a 3.25% surtax on those earning more than $1 million a year.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Republicans have floated a lot of proposals for ending the government shutdown they instigated last week, but they've typically shared a fundamental flaw: They try to embarrass Democrats into signing on rather than offering something that Democrats actually want. By Wednesday, though, a handful of Republicans in the House and the Senate were circulating proposals with real sweeteners in them for their opposite numbers. They may not go far enough to bring the two sides together, but they raise an interesting question: Have Democrats left themselves room to accept anything short of complete capitulation by the GOP?
NATIONAL
October 10, 2002 | JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One senator is a Democrat, the other a Republican. One is from the West Coast, the other from the East. Both are agonizing over war with Iraq. As the Senate nears its vote on a resolution that would authorize President Bush to attack Iraq, Dianne Feinstein of California and Susan Collins of Maine are officially undeclared. Senate handicappers figure that Collins, a Republican, will ultimately support the resolution while Democrat Feinstein, depending on the measure's wording, may not.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON -- Two moderate Republican senators joined in criticism of Susan Rice, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, after private meetings with her, in another setback for her hopes to be nominated as secretary of State. Sens. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) met with Rice on Wednesday afternoon at her request to discuss their concern that she had misled the public about the nature of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed four Americans.
NATIONAL
December 1, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
The Senate rejected competing measures to extend a payroll tax cut Thursday night, an outward display of partisanship as Republicans and Democrats moved behind the scenes to avert a $1,000 tax hike on American workers come Jan. 1. Both bills met with GOP opposition, illustrating deep resistance within the ranks despite party leaders' efforts to coalesce around the politically volatile issue. First, Republicans blocked President Obama's proposal to expand the payroll tax break to $1,500 for 2012 and extend it to employers who hire new workers, paying for it with a 3.25% surtax on those earning more than $1 million a year.
NATIONAL
October 5, 2004 | Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writer
In the Senate, senior members who chair the most powerful committees long have been accustomed to having their way on the most important national security issues. But when Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) was looking for a senator to write legislation in response to the Sept. 11 commission's finding that the nation's spy agencies had failed to protect Americans from the terrorist attacks, he bypassed the Appropriations, Armed Services and Intelligence committees.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2002 | JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One senator is a Democrat, the other a Republican. One is from the West Coast, the other from the East. Both are agonizing over war with Iraq. As the Senate nears its vote on a resolution that would authorize President Bush to attack Iraq, Dianne Feinstein of California and Susan Collins of Maine are officially undeclared. Senate handicappers figure that Collins, a Republican, will ultimately support the resolution while Democrat Feinstein, depending on the measure's wording, may not.
NEWS
January 3, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For straying from Republican orthodoxy, they have been ostracized, berated and even punished by their conservative Senate colleagues. While promoting campaign finance reform, Susan Collins of Maine was never sure if any fellow Republicans would sit at her table during their weekly lunches. James M. Jeffords of Vermont felt their wrath while standing fast as the lone GOP sponsor of President Clinton's health care reform plan. For Maine's Olympia J.
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High above the Senate floor, the lights shone brightly for the TV cameras. One by one, the 91 men and 9 women made known their positions on a minor amendment in a roll-call vote. But the real action was taking place far from the spotlight. Around the corner, in a 19th century "American Renaissance" parlor, two junior senators huddled conspiratorially on an overstuffed, red leather couch. If campaign finance reform is enacted by this Congress, the half-hour tete-a-tete between Sens. Russell D.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2003 | From Reuters
The federal government's chief procurement agency has defended its decision to continue contracting with scandal-ridden telecommunications giant WorldCom Inc. In a letter to Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), the General Services Administration said it had not disqualified WorldCom, now doing business as MCI, because there was no evidence the company could not provide the services for the government.
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