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Susan Estrich

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1999 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan moved quickly Tuesday to fill an upcoming vacancy on his most important city commission, the panel that oversees the Los Angeles Police Department, and at the same time tapped a well-known law professor and commentator for a post on the city's ethics board. In both cases, Riordan turned to lawyers and in both cases to women: He named labor attorney and Ethics Commissioner Raquelle de la Rocha to the civilian board that sets policy for the LAPD.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 26, 2009
Today's topic: President Obama announced plans to close the Guantanamo Bay detention camp within a year. How big a policy shift is that, and how should the administration handle enemy combatants -- not just those in Gitmo today, but the ones apprehended in the future? All week, Hugh Hewitt and Susan Estrich debate Obama's first days in office. Obama wants to defeat terrorists. But how will he do it? Point: Hugh Hewitt It is always fun to work with you Susan, and I am very interested in your take on what will happen to the Gitmo terrorists.
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NEWS
February 5, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Estrich never considered abortion to be her issue. Yes, she was pro-choice. And yes, she has worked on abortion cases ever since she was a law clerk. But she was so much more, well, mainstream in her interests, which usually involved national politics. All that has changed. The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in the Webster case last July opened the door to what Estrich, 37, believes is potential disaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2005 | Scott Collins, Times Staff Writer
Stumping for the nation's first female president, Susan Estrich is forming a different kind of party. Estrich -- USC law professor, author and longtime Democratic insider -- has invited about 50 area VIPs to a "house party" at her Hancock Park home, promoting ABC's Tuesday premiere of "Commander in Chief." The series stars Geena Davis as President Mackenzie Allen, who struggles to balance hectic workdays in the Oval Office with the harried demands of motherhood.
HEALTH
February 22, 1999 | SHARI ROAN
Susan Estrich is best known for her political and legal commentary. But, among her friends and acquaintances in Los Angeles, where she lives and teaches at USC, she has also become known as a woman who managed to bring a longtime weight problem under control. In her new book, Estrich sets out to answer the question: "Why do intelligent women get stupid when it comes to their own bodies?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1993
In response to "The Runner Stumbles," Opinion, Jan. 31: For four years Susan Estrich, failed campaign manager of the failed Michael Dukakis campaign, has given her opinions on running the country, replete with negative reaction to George Bush. Now, we're apparently in for her continued criticism of the new, Democratic President. Her credentials for this yammering are so dubious that one can only scratch one's head in wonderment. MARY LOU WHITMORE Brentwood
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2005 | Scott Collins, Times Staff Writer
Stumping for the nation's first female president, Susan Estrich is forming a different kind of party. Estrich -- USC law professor, author and longtime Democratic insider -- has invited about 50 area VIPs to a "house party" at her Hancock Park home, promoting ABC's Tuesday premiere of "Commander in Chief." The series stars Geena Davis as President Mackenzie Allen, who struggles to balance hectic workdays in the Oval Office with the harried demands of motherhood.
NEWS
June 4, 1988 | BELLA STUMBO, Times Staff Writer
Susan Estrich, 35, national campaign manager for Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis--and the first woman to hold such a weighty post in presidential politics--is variously described by admirers as brilliant, shrewd, dynamic, witty, a natural leader. Critics call her imperious, rude, coarse, vindictive and intimidating. But either way, meeting Estrich for the first time, it takes about two minutes to determine this much: If energy alone can do it, George Bush is history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly pregnant with a second child, Susan Estrich was wandering around the 1992 Republican Convention in Houston when a woman approached. "You're the baby killer," the woman said to Estrich, the liberal who managed Democrat Michael Dukakis' 1988 failed presidential campaign. "I took a deep breath," Estrich said at a debate with prominent conservative Republican strategist William Kristol over the impact of the "religious right" on American politics. "You don't know me at all.
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
For all the talk of merging Michael S. Dukakis' campaign operation with the staffs of his rivals, particularly the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Dukakis leaves Atlanta today to start his general election campaign with essentially the same high command he has had around him since his presidential bid started almost a year and a half ago. It is a young and tight-knit group, many of whose members have worked together for years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1999 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan moved quickly Tuesday to fill an upcoming vacancy on his most important city commission, the panel that oversees the Los Angeles Police Department, and at the same time tapped a well-known law professor and commentator for a post on the city's ethics board. In both cases, Riordan turned to lawyers and in both cases to women: He named labor attorney and Ethics Commissioner Raquelle de la Rocha to the civilian board that sets policy for the LAPD.
HEALTH
February 22, 1999 | SHARI ROAN
Susan Estrich is best known for her political and legal commentary. But, among her friends and acquaintances in Los Angeles, where she lives and teaches at USC, she has also become known as a woman who managed to bring a longtime weight problem under control. In her new book, Estrich sets out to answer the question: "Why do intelligent women get stupid when it comes to their own bodies?"
BOOKS
July 12, 1998 | EDWARD LAZARUS, Edward Lazarus is the author of "Closed Chambers: The First Eyewitness Account of the Epic Struggles Inside the Supreme Court" (Times Books)
Sitting down with these colorfully titled volumes is like being flanked at a dinner party by two scintillating legal experts overflowing with enthusiasm and insights into virtually every topic within their field of expertise. From the trials of O.J. Simpson and the Menendez brothers to the insanity defense, battered wives syndrome, Willie Horton, the ethics of defense lawyers, Roe vs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1995 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly pregnant with a second child, Susan Estrich was wandering around the 1992 Republican Convention in Houston when a woman approached. "You're the baby killer," the woman said to Estrich, the liberal who managed Democrat Michael Dukakis' 1988 failed presidential campaign. "I took a deep breath," Estrich said at a debate with prominent conservative Republican strategist William Kristol over the impact of the "religious right" on American politics. "You don't know me at all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1993
In response to "The Runner Stumbles," Opinion, Jan. 31: For four years Susan Estrich, failed campaign manager of the failed Michael Dukakis campaign, has given her opinions on running the country, replete with negative reaction to George Bush. Now, we're apparently in for her continued criticism of the new, Democratic President. Her credentials for this yammering are so dubious that one can only scratch one's head in wonderment. MARY LOU WHITMORE Brentwood
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Susan Estrich never considered abortion to be her issue. Yes, she was pro-choice. And yes, she has worked on abortion cases ever since she was a law clerk. But she was so much more, well, mainstream in her interests, which usually involved national politics. All that has changed. The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in the Webster case last July opened the door to what Estrich, 37, believes is potential disaster.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
On the Sunday night before Labor Day, John Sasso called five trusted advisers to an unusual reunion in a cramped third-floor conference room at Michael S. Dukakis' presidential campaign headquarters. Sasso had just returned as Dukakis' top strategist, and he frankly assessed the campaign's condition: adrift. "It was worse than he had feared," said one participant in the meeting.
OPINION
January 26, 2009
Today's topic: President Obama announced plans to close the Guantanamo Bay detention camp within a year. How big a policy shift is that, and how should the administration handle enemy combatants -- not just those in Gitmo today, but the ones apprehended in the future? All week, Hugh Hewitt and Susan Estrich debate Obama's first days in office. Obama wants to defeat terrorists. But how will he do it? Point: Hugh Hewitt It is always fun to work with you Susan, and I am very interested in your take on what will happen to the Gitmo terrorists.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
On the Sunday night before Labor Day, John Sasso called five trusted advisers to an unusual reunion in a cramped third-floor conference room at Michael S. Dukakis' presidential campaign headquarters. Sasso had just returned as Dukakis' top strategist, and he frankly assessed the campaign's condition: adrift. "It was worse than he had feared," said one participant in the meeting.
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
For all the talk of merging Michael S. Dukakis' campaign operation with the staffs of his rivals, particularly the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Dukakis leaves Atlanta today to start his general election campaign with essentially the same high command he has had around him since his presidential bid started almost a year and a half ago. It is a young and tight-knit group, many of whose members have worked together for years.
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