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Susan F Wood

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NATIONAL
September 1, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
The head of the Food and Drug Administration's women's health office resigned Wednesday in a widening protest over delays in deciding whether the "morning after" contraceptive could be sold without a prescription. Susan F.
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NATIONAL
September 1, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
The head of the Food and Drug Administration's women's health office resigned Wednesday in a widening protest over delays in deciding whether the "morning after" contraceptive could be sold without a prescription. Susan F.
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OPINION
August 1, 2006
IF TIMING IS EVERYTHING, then the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's announcement Monday was awfully convenient. The agency expressed newfound interest in meeting with the maker of the morning-after contraceptive drug, known as Plan B, just one day before Senate confirmation hearings are set to begin for the Bush administration's nominee to be FDA commissioner. The FDA said that it would work with Barr Pharmaceuticals Inc.
OPINION
September 6, 2005
IN ANNOUNCING HER RESIGNATION, Dr. Susan F. Wood did not resort to euphemism, those mealy-mouthed phrases about spending more time with her family or seeking new opportunities. Her e-mail broadside to friends and colleagues at the Food and Drug Administration, where she was until last Wednesday the director of the office of women's health, is but the latest documentation of the Bush administration's politicization of science.
OPINION
September 20, 2005 | Chris Mooney, CHRIS MOONEY is Washington correspondent for Seed magazine and author of "The Republican War on Science" (Basic Books), which was published Sept. 9.
THE LAMENTATION in the forthcoming New England Journal of Medicine is typical of a growing genre: complaints about the misuse of science by the Bush administration. It is merely the latest jeremiad, from a group of distinguished experts, about the loss of reason by our leaders.
NATIONAL
November 15, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Federal drug regulators compromised their usual science-based decision-making process when they ruled in 2004 against letting the "morning-after" birth control pill be sold without a prescription, congressional investigators said Monday.
HEALTH
October 1, 2001 | LINDA MARSA, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Prescription drugs affect women differently than men. Their body composition is different, with more fat and less muscle, and they experience more dramatic hormonal changes, both of which play a crucial role in the body's response to a drug. Recognizing this, the Food and Drug Administration in 1998 required drug companies to test new medications on men and women. This more-thorough testing was supposed to better predict gender-specific side effects and correct common dosage problems.
SCIENCE
August 25, 2006 | Denise Gellene and Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writers
The Food and Drug Administration decided Thursday to make the "morning-after" contraceptive pill known as Plan B available without a prescription to people 18 and older, ending a three-year impasse that put the agency at the center of a polarizing debate over reproductive choice. Girls 17 and younger will need a prescription to obtain the pills, which will be available only from pharmacists at drugstores and health clinics. Purchasers will be required to show proof of their age.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2006 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writers
The government on Friday rescinded a 14-year ban on silicone gel implants for cosmetic breast enhancement, a decision praised by some for providing women with a better product but criticized by others who still question their safety. Approval by the Food and Drug Administration had been expected, with silicone implants available in most other countries, where they have quickly replaced the saline-filled alternatives. But the approval came with conditions and warnings.
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