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Susan Faludi

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2007 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writer
THE big striped armchair in the Russian Hill coffeehouse made Susan Faludi look even smaller than she is. It was Oct. 2, publication day for her latest book, and she was getting ready to head down the Santa Cruz coast to talk about "The Terror Dream: Fear and Fantasy in Post-9/11 America." After that, she'd be on a plane east for the official book-tour kickoff. Faludi herself was fine, she said, with the prospect of a month or so on the road.
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OPINION
January 21, 2008
Re "The correct Clinton stereotype," Opinion, Jan. 15 Susan Faludi was right. A suggestion for the stunning array of Hillary Clinton-hating pundits: Deal with your mother issues under the supervision of a competent, compassionate therapist. This may free you to cover the election in a more clear-eyed, intelligent and grown-up manner. Christine Ecklund Santa Monica -- I think people sense and have experienced the compassion that is seemingly inherent in women. However, I personally found the timing of Clinton's tears extraordinary considering the circumstances.
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NEWS
September 29, 1999 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you ran into famous feminist Susan Faludi in a dark alley, do you think you'd recognize her? Probably not, and with good reason. The controversial author of the 1992 bestseller "Backlash" (Crown) hasn't been around, at least not where cameras are concerned. She's been turning down talking-head media opportunities for years. She's been too busy reporting.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2007 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writer
THE big striped armchair in the Russian Hill coffeehouse made Susan Faludi look even smaller than she is. It was Oct. 2, publication day for her latest book, and she was getting ready to head down the Santa Cruz coast to talk about "The Terror Dream: Fear and Fantasy in Post-9/11 America." After that, she'd be on a plane east for the official book-tour kickoff. Faludi herself was fine, she said, with the prospect of a month or so on the road.
BOOKS
September 30, 2007 | Amy Wilentz, Amy Wilentz is the author, most recently, of "I Feel Earthquakes More Often Than They Happen: Coming to California in the Age of Schwarzenegger."
AMERICAN mythmaking can be complicated. Take George Washington and his apocryphal cherry tree, for example -- how many twists and turns did it take before this patently embroidered story became a chapter in the national bible? At least I can understand why a nation would have such a story: What land does not want to believe that its founding military man was also a man of unshakable honesty, especially if his historical honesty is questionable?
BOOKS
September 26, 1999 | SUSIE LINFIELD, Susie Linfield teaches in the Cultural Reporting and Criticism Program at New York University and is a contributing writer to Book Review
Why are men so screwed up? This is the bedeviling question Susan Faludi seeks to answer in "Stiffed: The Betrayal of the American Man." Publicity surrounding Faludi's new book suggests that it will do for men what "Backlash," her extravagantly praised, harshly resented 1991 feminist treatise, did for women. In any case "Stiffed," which has already become a media event (Faludi appeared on the Sept. 13 cover of Newsweek), will almost surely become the focus of heated debate.
BOOKS
November 17, 2002 | Lynda Obst, Lynda Obst, a producer at Paramount Pictures, is the author of "Hello, He Lied: And Other Truths From the Hollywood Trenches."
"We forget history so fast in this country," a television writer named Dianne Dixon told Mollie Gregory. "Like water on a hot sidewalk, it evaporates before it's recorded." It's a telling quote that captures the importance of Gregory's recent book, "Women Who Run the Show," an exhaustively researched, if not elegantly written, tome about how a band of sisters crashed the all-boys party that was Hollywood.
NEWS
October 6, 1999
Re "She Said He Said" (Sept. 29), perhaps Susan Faludi might finally gain a little insight and see what has eluded her for so long, namely the extent of the similarities between feminist-era pronunciations against males and Nazi-era pronunciations against Jews. --GREG McKAY Glendale
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1993
Well-meaning people like Susan Faludi and Rita Kempley overlook the fact that movies are entertainment. They are diversions, fantasies, for fun. They do not have to have a serious message on social issues. Preachers and politicians and professors cover these issues. ANNETTE C. HENSLER Anaheim
BOOKS
November 15, 1992
Patrick Goldstein didn't review Rush Limbaugh's "The Way Things Ought to Be" (Nov. 1) so much as sneer at it. But even accepting this, I was surprised at how ugly he got. By the end, Goldstein's "humorous" hypothesis was that Rush's problems could be fixed if he just found the right woman. I wonder how much Goldstein would laugh if someone suggested Susan Faludi would stop whining if only she slept with a real man? TIMOTHY MUELLER, LOS ANGELES
BOOKS
September 30, 2007 | Amy Wilentz, Amy Wilentz is the author, most recently, of "I Feel Earthquakes More Often Than They Happen: Coming to California in the Age of Schwarzenegger."
AMERICAN mythmaking can be complicated. Take George Washington and his apocryphal cherry tree, for example -- how many twists and turns did it take before this patently embroidered story became a chapter in the national bible? At least I can understand why a nation would have such a story: What land does not want to believe that its founding military man was also a man of unshakable honesty, especially if his historical honesty is questionable?
BOOKS
November 17, 2002 | Lynda Obst, Lynda Obst, a producer at Paramount Pictures, is the author of "Hello, He Lied: And Other Truths From the Hollywood Trenches."
"We forget history so fast in this country," a television writer named Dianne Dixon told Mollie Gregory. "Like water on a hot sidewalk, it evaporates before it's recorded." It's a telling quote that captures the importance of Gregory's recent book, "Women Who Run the Show," an exhaustively researched, if not elegantly written, tome about how a band of sisters crashed the all-boys party that was Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2001
In her latest fact-free diatribe, Norah Vincent (Commentary, July 11) claims 'feminist soldiers' are clamoring to anoint Andrea Yates (the woman who drowned her five kids) a victim of the patriarchy--though, of course, Vincent isn't able to name a single such perpetrator. Had she consulted any feminists, she might know that feminism has always espoused responsibility for one's actions as an essential ingredient of self-determination. Maybe the problem isn't feminists offering blanket gender pardons regardless of the evidence, but Vincent disregarding the evidence to hand out a blanket condemnation of feminism.
NEWS
October 6, 1999
Re "She Said He Said" (Sept. 29), perhaps Susan Faludi might finally gain a little insight and see what has eluded her for so long, namely the extent of the similarities between feminist-era pronunciations against males and Nazi-era pronunciations against Jews. --GREG McKAY Glendale
NEWS
September 29, 1999 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you ran into famous feminist Susan Faludi in a dark alley, do you think you'd recognize her? Probably not, and with good reason. The controversial author of the 1992 bestseller "Backlash" (Crown) hasn't been around, at least not where cameras are concerned. She's been turning down talking-head media opportunities for years. She's been too busy reporting.
BOOKS
September 26, 1999 | SUSIE LINFIELD, Susie Linfield teaches in the Cultural Reporting and Criticism Program at New York University and is a contributing writer to Book Review
Why are men so screwed up? This is the bedeviling question Susan Faludi seeks to answer in "Stiffed: The Betrayal of the American Man." Publicity surrounding Faludi's new book suggests that it will do for men what "Backlash," her extravagantly praised, harshly resented 1991 feminist treatise, did for women. In any case "Stiffed," which has already become a media event (Faludi appeared on the Sept. 13 cover of Newsweek), will almost surely become the focus of heated debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2001
In her latest fact-free diatribe, Norah Vincent (Commentary, July 11) claims 'feminist soldiers' are clamoring to anoint Andrea Yates (the woman who drowned her five kids) a victim of the patriarchy--though, of course, Vincent isn't able to name a single such perpetrator. Had she consulted any feminists, she might know that feminism has always espoused responsibility for one's actions as an essential ingredient of self-determination. Maybe the problem isn't feminists offering blanket gender pardons regardless of the evidence, but Vincent disregarding the evidence to hand out a blanket condemnation of feminism.
OPINION
January 21, 2008
Re "The correct Clinton stereotype," Opinion, Jan. 15 Susan Faludi was right. A suggestion for the stunning array of Hillary Clinton-hating pundits: Deal with your mother issues under the supervision of a competent, compassionate therapist. This may free you to cover the election in a more clear-eyed, intelligent and grown-up manner. Christine Ecklund Santa Monica -- I think people sense and have experienced the compassion that is seemingly inherent in women. However, I personally found the timing of Clinton's tears extraordinary considering the circumstances.
NEWS
September 9, 1999
Susan Faludi, best known for her 1992 award-winning and bestselling book "Backlash: The Undeclared War Against Women," might have been the last person you'd suspect of standing up for men. But the Los Angeles resident does just that in her new book, "Stiffed: The Betrayal of American Man," scheduled to arrive in bookstores in coming weeks. In it, Faludi explores the pressure on men to be masculine in a culture that no longer honors traditional codes of manhood.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
June 2, 1986: A Newsweek cover story, "The Marriage Crunch," asks: "Is It Too Late for Prince Charming?" Citing a study by three researchers from Yale and Harvard, it drops a bombshell on never-wed, white, college-educated women 40 or older: They are "more likely to be killed by a terrorist" than to find husbands. This "man shortage," widely ballyhooed by the media, created a wave of near-hysteria among women of a certain age who had it all--except husbands.
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